Skip header and navigation

Refine By

976 records – page 1 of 98.

[10-year monitoring of morbidity, mortality and lethality from myocardial infarct and stroke]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55059
Source
Ter Arkh. 1993;65(4):9-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
V V Gafarov
N G Kozel
I A Arkhipenko
N S Khrushcheva
S V Voitsitskaia
V L Feigin
T E Vinogradova
Source
Ter Arkh. 1993;65(4):9-13
Date
1993
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Cerebrovascular Disorders - epidemiology - mortality
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - mortality
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Siberia - epidemiology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The data on the studies using WHO programs "Register of Acute Myocardial Infarction", "Register of Brain Apoplexy", "MONICA" in one of the districts of Novosibirsk have been pooled and analyzed. The studies have established objective trends in the incidence, mortality, lethality of myocardial infarction and brain apoplexy in the population aged 25-64 for 10 years.
PubMed ID
8059418 View in PubMed
Less detail

21 year trends in incidence of myocardial infarction and mortality from coronary disease in middle-age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210947
Source
Eur Heart J. 1996 Oct;17(10):1495-502
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
P. Immonen-Räihä
M. Arstila
J. Tuomilehto
M. Haikio
A. Mononen
T. Vuorenmaa
J. Torppa
I. Parvinen
Author Affiliation
Health Office City of Turku, Finland.
Source
Eur Heart J. 1996 Oct;17(10):1495-502
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood pressure
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Disease - mortality - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - prevention & control
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Survival Analysis
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this study is to describe the 21 year trends in myocardial infarction among middle-aged inhabitants in the city of Turku, in southwestern Finland. Since 1972 the coronary register in Turku has monitored acute coronary events leading to hospital admission or death, first according to the methods of the World Health Organization Heart Attack Register Study, and since 1982 according to the methods of the WHO MONICA. From 1972 to 1992 we registered 7374 events of suspected myocardial infarction, of which 6045 events occurring in inhabitants of Turku aged 35-64 years, fulfilled the criteria for myocardial infarction. Within 28 days, 2266 coronary events proved fatal. During the 21-year period, the incidence of definite myocardial infarction fell by 55% in men and by 62% in women, and coronary mortality fell by 66 and 81%, respectively. From 1972 to 1982, total mortality and coronary mortality decreased in parallel. Later on, the decrease in total mortality levelled off, even though coronary mortality fell still steeper, because mortality from external causes of death increased. The favourable long-term trends reflect favourable changes in total cholesterol and blood pressure in the middle-aged population, and the improvement in the treatment of myocardial infarction. Further efforts are needed to enhance this trend, but also to reduce total mortality among middle-aged people.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Heart J. 1996 Oct;17(10):1455-68909894
PubMed ID
8909905 View in PubMed
Less detail

Academic screencasting: internet-based dissemination of ophthalmology grand rounds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137424
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2011 Feb;46(1):72-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Roshan Razik
Zaid Mammo
Harmeet S Gill
Wai-Ching Lam
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont, Canada.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2011 Feb;46(1):72-6
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Internet
Internship and Residency
Ontario
Ophthalmology - education
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Teaching - methods
Teaching Rounds - methods
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To evaluate and compare the preferences and attitudes of Ontario ophthalmologists and ophthalmology residents toward screencasting as an educational tool with potential use for continuing medical education (CME) events.
Cross-sectional study.
Eighty of 256 participants completed the survey.
The surveys were sent to participants by email, with follow-up via telephone. Study participants were urban and rural Ontario ophthalmologists, registered with the Canadian Ophthalmological Society, and University of Toronto ophthalmology residents. Pre-recorded online presentations-screencasts-were used as the main intervention. Online surveys were used to measure multiple variables evaluating the attitudes of the participants toward screencasting. This data was then used for further quantitative and qualitative analysis.
Over 95% of participants replied favourably to the introduction and future utilization of screencasting for educational purposes. Rural ophthalmologists were the most enthusiastic about future events. Practising in rural Ontario was associated with a higher interest in live broadcasts than practising in urban centres (p
PubMed ID
21283162 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to and waiting time for psychiatrist services in a Canadian urban area: a study in real time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131782
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Aug;56(8):474-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Elliot M Goldner
Wayne Jones
Mei Lan Fang
Author Affiliation
Centre for Applied Research in Mental Health and Addiction, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, British Columbia. egoldner@sfu.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Aug;56(8):474-80
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Cognitive Therapy - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatry - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Waiting Lists
Abstract
To obtain improved quality information regarding psychiatrist waiting times by use of a novel methodological approach in which accessibility and wait times are determined by a real-time patient referral procedure.
An adult male patient with depression was referred for psychiatric assessment by a family physician. Consecutive calls were made to all registered psychiatrists (n = 297) in Vancouver. A semistructured call procedure was used to collect information about the psychiatrists' availability for receipt of this and similar referrals, identify factors that affect psychiatrist accessibility, and determine the availability of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT).
Efforts were made to contact 297 psychiatrists and 230 (77%) were reached successfully. Among the 230 psychiatrists contacted, 160 (70%) indicated that they were unable to accept the referral. Although 70 (30%) indicated that they might be able to consider accepting a referral, 64 (91% of those who would consider accepting the referral) indicated that they would need to review detailed, written referral information and could not provide estimates of the length of wait times if the patient was to be accepted. Only 6 (3% of the 230 psychiatrists contacted) offered immediate appointment times and their wait times ranged from 4 to 55 days. When asked whether they could provide CBT, most (56%) psychiatrists in clinical practice answered maybe.
Substantial barriers exist for family physicians attempting to refer patients for psychiatric referral. Consolidated efforts to improve access to psychiatric assessment are needed.
PubMed ID
21878158 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to primary care from the perspective of Aboriginal patients at an urban emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139323
Source
Qual Health Res. 2011 Mar;21(3):333-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Annette J Browne
Victoria L Smye
Patricia Rodney
Sannie Y Tang
Bill Mussell
John O'Neil
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. annette.browne@nursing.ubc.ca
Source
Qual Health Res. 2011 Mar;21(3):333-48
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anthropology, Cultural
British Columbia
Canada
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Triage
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
In this article, we discuss findings from an ethnographic study in which we explored experiences of access to primary care services from the perspective of Aboriginal people seeking care at an emergency department (ED) located in a large Canadian city. Data were collected over 20 months of immersion in the ED, and included participant observation and in-depth interviews with 44 patients triaged as stable and nonurgent, most of whom were living in poverty and residing in the inner city. Three themes in the findings are discussed: (a) anticipating providers' assumptions; (b) seeking help for chronic pain; and (c) use of the ED as a reflection of social suffering. Implications of these findings are discussed in relation to the role of the ED as well as the broader primary care sector in responding to the needs of patients affected by poverty, racialization, and other forms of disadvantage.
PubMed ID
21075979 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A clinico-epidemiological analysis of Huntington's chorea in the population of Astrakhan].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222331
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1993;93(5):9-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993

[A comparative study of the evolution of atherosclerosis in men over a 25-year period in 11 European and Asiatic cities]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54287
Source
Arkh Patol. 1998 Nov-Dec;60(6):3-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
A M Vikhert
V S Zhdanov
N H Sternby
J. Dusková
I E Galakhov
Author Affiliation
A. L. Myasnikov Institute of Clinical Cardiology, Russian Cardiologic Scientific Centre, Moscow.
Source
Arkh Patol. 1998 Nov-Dec;60(6):3-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aorta - pathology
Arteriosclerosis - ethnology - pathology
Asia, Central - epidemiology
Autopsy - statistics & numerical data
Comparative Study
Continental Population Groups
Coronary Vessels - pathology
Disease Progression
English Abstract
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oceanic Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Siberia - epidemiology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Repeated epidemiologic study of atherosclerosis in males on the basis of autopsy material with 25-year interval (1963-66 and 1985-89) has been performed in 7 European cities (Malmö, Praha, Riga, Tallinn, Tartu, Kharkov, Yalta) and 4 Asia cities (Ashkhabad, Bishkek, Irkutsk, Yakutsk). Accelerated development of atherosclerosis in the 2nd study has been revealed in males in the majority of cities except Malmö and Praha. No significant differences in atherosclerosis of aorta and coronary arteries were found in these two cities. An increase of the calcinosis surface in the coronary arteries combined with a higher incidence of coronary stenosis was typical for the 2nd study. Atherosclerosis was less pronounced in the indigenous population of Ashkhabad, Bishkek and Yakutsk in both studied than in non-indigenous populations. There was a positive correlation in males between lethality of coronary heart disease and other cardiovascular diseases and the degree of coronary atherosclerosis. Thus, the course of atherosclerosis can change within the life of one generation.
PubMed ID
9949896 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active Commuting Behaviors in a Nordic Metropolitan Setting in Relation to Modality, Gender, and Health Recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274992
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Dec;12(12):15626-48
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Erik Stigell
Peter Schantz
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Dec;12(12):15626-48
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bicycling - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Transportation - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Walking - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Active commuting between home and place of work or study is often cited as an interesting source of physical activity in a public health perspective. However, knowledge about these behaviors is meager. This was therefore studied in adult active commuters (n = 1872) in Greater Stockholm, Sweden, a Nordic metropolitan setting. They received questionnaires and individually adjusted maps to draw their normal commuting route. Three different modality groups were identified in men and women: single-mode cyclists and pedestrians (those who only cycle or walk, respectively) and dual-mode commuters (those who alternately walk or cycle). Some gender differences were observed in trip distances, frequencies, and velocities. A large majority of the commuting trip durations met the minimum health recommendation of at least 10-minute-long activity bouts. The median single-mode pedestrians and dual-mode commuters met or were close to the recommended weekly physical activity levels of at least 150 minutes most of the year, whereas the single-mode cyclists did so only during spring-mid-fall. A high total number of trips per year (range of medians: 230-390) adds to the value in a health perspective. To fully grasp active commuting behaviors in future studies, both walking and cycling should be assessed over different seasons and ideally over the whole year.
Notes
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2000 Feb;32(2):504-1010694139
Cites: BMC Med Res Methodol. 2011;11(1):621241470
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2000 Sep;32(9 Suppl):S498-50410993420
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2010 Nov;64(11):1010-619843499
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2009 Feb;41(2):472-819151593
Cites: Sports Med. 2008;38(9):751-818712942
Cites: Circulation. 2007 Aug 28;116(9):1081-9317671237
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2007 Jan;41(1):8-1217021003
Cites: JAMA. 1995 Feb 1;273(5):402-77823386
Cites: J Appl Physiol (1985). 1992 Nov;73(5):2004-101474078
Cites: Prev Med. 2002 Oct;35(4):397-40012453718
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2002 Dec;34(12):1996-200112471307
Cites: Bull World Health Organ. 2002;80(12):933-812571720
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2003 Jun;35(6):1004-812783049
Cites: Obes Res. 2004 Apr;12(4):688-9415090638
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1979 Dec;110(6):724-33555591
Cites: Clin Physiol. 1983 Apr;3(2):141-516682735
Cites: Acta Physiol Scand. 1983 Feb;117(2):219-266223509
Cites: J Appl Physiol (1985). 1990 May;68(5):1833-72361884
PubMed ID
26690193 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active transportation environments surrounding Canadian schools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130132
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 Sep-Oct;102(5):364-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sean O'Loghlen
J William Pickett
Ian Janssen
Author Affiliation
School of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 Sep-Oct;102(5):364-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bicycling - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Humans
Motor Activity
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Schools - statistics & numerical data
Transportation - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Walking - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Walking or cycling to school represents an opportunity for children to engage in physical activity. The study objectives were to: 1) describe active transportation policies, programs, and built environments of Canadian schools and their surrounding neighbourhoods, and 2) document variations based on urban-rural location and school type (primary vs. secondary vs. mixed primary/secondary schools).
397 schools from across Canada were studied. A school administrator completed a questionnaire and responses were used to assess schools' policies and programs related to active transportation and the safety and aesthetics of their respective neighbourhoods. Built environment features in a 1 km-radius circular buffer around each school were measured using geographic information systems.
Greater than 70% of schools had passive policies (e.g., skateboards permitted on school grounds) and facilities (e.g., bicycle racks in secure area to avoid theft) to encourage bicycle and small-wheeled vehicle use. Less than 40% of schools had active programs designed to encourage active transportation, such as organized 'walk to school' days. Garbage in the streets, crime and substance abuse were barriers in most school neighbourhoods. Approximately 42% of schools were located on high-speed roads not amenable to active transportation and 14% did not have a sidewalk leading to the school. Secondary schools had less favourable active transportation policies/programs and neighbourhood safety/aesthetics compared to primary schools. Rural schools had less favourable built environments than urban schools.
Canadian children, particularly those from rural areas, face a number of impediments to active transportation as a method of travelling to school.
PubMed ID
22032103 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Acute nonfatal poisonings by drug preparations].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226125
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 1991 Jul-Sep;34(3):36-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
M I Krut'
G N Zaraf'iants
Source
Sud Med Ekspert. 1991 Jul-Sep;34(3):36-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Age Factors
Drug Overdose - epidemiology - etiology
Forensic Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Poison Control Centers - statistics & numerical data
Poisoning - epidemiology - etiology
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Suicide, Attempted - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Acute non-lethal poisonings with drugs within the period of 10 years according to archives data of Toxicological center and medicolegal department of victims' examination in Leningrad medicolegal expert Bureau were analysed. Number of drug poisoning cases increased two-fold and formed 76% of all poisoning cases. Tranquilizers, then antihistaminic, neuroleptic and hypotensive (clofelin) agents were used most often. Drugs were taken with suicidal attempt or with the aim of getting "alcoholic" effect. Poisonings among women were registered three times more often than among men.
PubMed ID
1836904 View in PubMed
Less detail

976 records – page 1 of 98.