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A 50-Year Commitment to American Indian and Alaska Native Women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304709
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2020 10; 136(4):739-744
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
10-2020
Author
Alan G Waxman
William H J Haffner
Jean Howe
Kathleen Wilder
Tony Ogburn
Neil Murphy
Eve Espey
J Martin Tucker
Amanda Bruegl
Elaine Locke
Yvonne Malloy
Author Affiliation
University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico; the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland; the Northern Navajo Medical Center, Shiprock, New Mexico; the Mid-Columbia Medical Center, The Dalles, Oregon; the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, Texas; the Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage, Alaska; the University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi; the Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon; and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Washington, DC.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2020 10; 136(4):739-744
Date
10-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaskan Natives
Female
Gynecology
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration - standards - trends
Healthcare Disparities - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American
Intersectoral Collaboration
Obstetrics
Program Evaluation
Quality Improvement - organization & administration
Rural Health Services - standards
Surveys and Questionnaires
United States - epidemiology
Urban Health Services - standards
Vulnerable Populations - ethnology
Women's Health Services - organization & administration - standards - trends
Abstract
Since 1970, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' Committee on American Indian and Alaska Native Women's Health has partnered with the Indian Health Service and health care facilities serving Native American women to improve quality of care in both rural and urban settings. Needs assessments have included formal surveys, expert panels, consensus conferences, and onsite program reviews. Improved care has been achieved through continuing professional education, recruitment of volunteer obstetrician-gynecologists, advocacy, and close collaboration at the local and national levels. The inclusive and multifaceted approach of this program should provide an effective model for collaborations between specialty societies and health care professionals providing primary care services that can reduce health disparities in underserved populations.
PubMed ID
32925622 View in PubMed
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[A cardiovascular health promotion program for 9-12 year old children and the community of Saint-Louis du Parc/Quebec].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202967
Source
Sante Publique. 1998 Dec;10(4):425-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
L. Renaud
J. O'Loughlin
G. Paradis
S. Chevalier
Author Affiliation
Régie régionale de Montréal-Centre, Québec.
Source
Sante Publique. 1998 Dec;10(4):425-45
Date
Dec-1998
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Organizational Objectives
Poverty
Program Evaluation
Quebec
Risk factors
Urban Health Services - organization & administration
Abstract
This article presents a programme for cardiovascular health for 9 to 12 years old children, called "Healthy Heart" Saint-Louis du Parc and carried out in low socioeconomic and multiethnic part of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. These five years programme targets were more both spheres: school and community (leisure centre, ethnocultural centre, groceries and other places). We develop the objectives, the conceptual models underlying to the programme, the perspective of work, the infrastructure of the programme: its staff and financing, the partnerships and the structure organising. Then we present the various interventions carried out along the period and so a description of many evaluations. At last, we discuss about the programme continuation.
PubMed ID
10065008 View in PubMed
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[Access to general practitioners in a county in Troms]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70574
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Aug 25;125(16):2210-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-25-2005
Author
Anne Helen Hansen
Ivar J Aaraas
Jorun Støvne Pettersen
Gerd Ersdal
Author Affiliation
Tromsø kommune, Rådhuset, 9299 Tromsø. anne.helen.hansen@tromso.kommune.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Aug 25;125(16):2210-2
Date
Aug-25-2005
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Emergency Medical Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
English Abstract
Family Practice - standards - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services Accessibility - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews
Male
Norway
Physicians, Family
Physicians, Women
Referral and Consultation - standards - statistics & numerical data
Rural Health Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Telephone
Urban Health Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In 2002 the Norwegian Board of Health made a survey of the accessibility of general practitioners in Troms county in North Norway. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a telephone interview one secretary in each surgery informed about telephone response time, planned time for telephone consultations, recorded numbers of urgent consultations, and waiting time to obtain a routine consultation. RESULTS: On average, the planned telephone time was two hours per week. Telephone time was in inverse proportion to the number of patients on the doctor's list. Rural doctors spent twice as much time as urban colleagues on the telephone with their patients. Doctors with lists between 500 and 1500 patients had a higher proportion of urgent consultations compared with doctors with shorter or longer lists. INTERPRETATION: Telephone response time below two minutes and waiting times for routine consultations below 20 days appear to be within acceptable norms. When patient lists are above 1500, doctors' capacity to offer telephone contact and emergency services to their patients seems reduced.
PubMed ID
16138139 View in PubMed
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Access to syringes in three Russian cities: implications for syringe distribution and coverage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158518
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2008 Apr;19 Suppl 1:S25-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Anya Sarang
Tim Rhodes
Lucy Platt
Author Affiliation
Russian Harm Reduction Network, Ilimskaya Street, 4-1-38, 127576 Moscow, Russia. anyasarang@gmail.com
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2008 Apr;19 Suppl 1:S25-36
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Data Collection
Female
HIV Infections - prevention & control - transmission
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Needle-Exchange Programs - economics - utilization
Pharmacies - organization & administration
Preventive Health Services - economics - organization & administration
Risk-Taking
Russia
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - complications
Syringes - supply & distribution
Urban Health Services - supply & distribution
Abstract
We report findings from a multi-method study investigating drug injectors' access to needles and syringes in three large Russian cities (Moscow, Volgograd, Barnaul).
We undertook 209 qualitative interviews among drug injectors, and supplemented these with baseline data from a community-recruited survey of 1473 drug injectors.
Almost all (93%; 1277) injectors used pharmacies as their main source of clean injecting equipment, and only 7% (105) reported ever having had contact with city syringe exchange projects. Good access to syringes has coincided with the expansion of private pharmacies. Key factors contributing to pharmacy access included: geographic proximity; low cost; and the restrictive policies of exchange instituted at local syringe exchanges. A fear of police interference surrounded the use of pharmacies and syringe exchanges, and fed a reluctance to carry used needles and syringes, which in turn acted as a disincentive to syringe exchange attendance. The perceived benefits of syringe exchanges over pharmacies included the additional health services on offer and the social support provided, but these benefits were over-shadowed by disadvantages. Multivariable analyses of survey data in two cities show no differences on account of risk behaviour among injectors sourcing equipment from pharmacies compared to syringe exchanges.
HIV prevention coverage indicators need to include measures of pharmacy-based syringe distribution and not only measures of syringe exchange coverage. There is an urgent need to pilot pharmacy-based distribution and exchange projects in Russia as well as other forms of secondary syringe distribution. Alongside expanding the reach of dedicated syringe exchange projects, pharmacy-based syringe distribution, and exchange, may help improve coverage of cost effective HIV prevention measures targeting drug injectors.
PubMed ID
18313910 View in PubMed
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Accidental out-of-hospital births in Finland: incidence and geographical distribution 1963-1995.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202145
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1999 May;78(5):372-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
K. Viisainen
M. Gissler
A L Hartikainen
E. Hemminki
Author Affiliation
STAKES (National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health), University of Helsinki, Department of Public Health, Finland.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1999 May;78(5):372-8
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Delivery Rooms - statistics & numerical data
Delivery, obstetric - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Hospitals - standards
Hospitals, Maternity - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Parity
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care
Rural Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Urban Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The study aims to describe the incidence and geographical distribution of accidental out-of-hospital births (accidental births) in Finland in relation to the changes in the hospital network, and to compare the perinatal outcomes of accidental births and all hospital births.
Data for the incidence and distribution analyses of accidental births were obtained from the official statistics between 1962 and 1973 and from the national Medical Birth Registry (MBR) in 1992-1993. The infant outcomes were analyzed for the MBR data in 1991-1995.
Between 1963 and 1975 the central hospital network expanded and by 1975 they covered 72% of births. The number of small maternity units has decreased since 1963. The incidence of accidental births decreased between 1963 and 1973, from 1.3 to 0.4 per 1000 births, and rose by the 1990s to 1/1000. In the 1990s the parity adjusted risk of an accidental birth was higher for residents of northern than of southern Finland, OR 2.51 (CI 1.75-3.60), and for residents of rural compared to urban municipalities, OR 3.26 (CI 2.48-4.27). The birthweight adjusted risk for a perinatal death was higher in accidental births than in hospital births, OR 3.11 (CI 1.42-6.84).
A temporal correlation between closing of small hospitals and an increase in accidental birth rates was detected. Due to the poor infant outcomes of accidental births, centralization policies should include measures to their prevention.
PubMed ID
10326879 View in PubMed
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Acupuncture for substance abuse treatment in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174951
Source
J Urban Health. 2005 Jun;82(2):285-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Patricia A Janssen
Louise C Demorest
Elizabeth M Whynot
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V62-1Y6. pjanssen@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
J Urban Health. 2005 Jun;82(2):285-95
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Therapy - utilization
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Charities
Community Health Services - utilization
Humans
Middle Aged
Poverty Areas
Questionnaires
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - prevention & control - therapy
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Urban health
Urban Health Services - utilization
Abstract
In British Columbia, Canada, the City of Vancouver's notorious Downtown Eastside (DES) represents the poorest urban population in Canada. A prevalence rate of 30% for HIV and 90% for hepatitis C makes this a priority area for public-health interventions aimed at reducing the use of injected drugs. This study examined the utility of acupuncture treatment in reducing substance use in the marginalized, transient population. Acupuncture was offered on a voluntary, drop-in basis 5 days per week at two community agencies. During a 3-month period, the program generated 2,755 client visits. A reduction in overall use of substances (P=.01) was reported by subjects in addition to a decrease in intensity of withdrawal symptoms including "shakes," stomach cramps, hallucinations, "muddle-headedness," insomnia, muscle aches, nausea, sweating, heart palpitations, and feeling suicidal, P
Notes
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PubMed ID
15872191 View in PubMed
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The adherence support gap: the 'ideal' versus 'reality' of antiretroviral adherence support provided by HIV health providers in clinical practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150598
Source
Ann Pharmacother. 2009 Jun;43(6):1036-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Laura Y Park-Wyllie
Derek Kam
Ahmed M Bayoumi
Author Affiliation
Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. parkwylliel@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
Ann Pharmacother. 2009 Jun;43(6):1036-44
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-HIV Agents - administration & dosage
Attitude of Health Personnel
Data Collection
HIV Infections - drug therapy
Humans
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Nurses - organization & administration - psychology
Ontario - epidemiology
Pharmacists - organization & administration - psychology
Physicians - organization & administration - psychology
Quality of Health Care
Urban Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Guidelines suggest that clinicians should provide their patients with antiretroviral adherence support, but there is uncertainty about the types of adherence support clinicians think are important, the methods they use to provide adherence support, and the barriers they face in providing such support in clinical practice.
To study clinician perspectives on the importance of different antiretroviral adherence support activities and compare these with clinicians' self-reported actual adherence support practices.
From March to August 2005, surveys were mailed to physicians, pharmacists, and nurses who provide care to HIV patients in Ontario, Canada. The 84-item survey asked providers to rate how necessary it was to provide 30 types of adherence support activities and how frequently they actually provided each of the types of adherence support. From this, we assessed healthcare provider perceptions of best or ideal practices in supporting medication adherence and actual or usual care in adherence support provision. We also examined whether an adherence support gap existed between the provision of best practice adherence support and actual adherence support in clinical practice.
One hundred sixty-nine of 300 mailed surveys were returned, for a response rate of 56%. Respondents were highly specialized in HIV care and nearly all practiced in urban settings. Respondents indicated that most of the surveyed adherence support activities should be provided to all patients. However, most clinicians did not actually provide these adherence supports to their patients to the extent that they desired. We calculated an adherence support gap that ranged from 31% to 75% across the different types of adherence support activities.
We observed important adherence support gaps between ideal best practices in the provision of adherence support and actual provision of adherence support in clinical practice.
PubMed ID
19491319 View in PubMed
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Adoption of the chronic care model to improve HIV care: in a marginalized, largely aboriginal population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113082
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Jun;59(6):650-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
David Tu
Patricia Belda
Doreen Littlejohn
Jeanette Somlak Pedersen
Juan Valle-Rivera
Mark Tyndall
Author Affiliation
Vancouver Native Health Society, 449 Hastings St E, Vancouver, BC V6A 1P5, Canada. davidtu9@gmail.com
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2013 Jun;59(6):650-7
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-HIV Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Chronic Disease - therapy
Community Health Centers
Female
HIV Seropositivity - ethnology - therapy
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Medication Adherence - ethnology
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient care team
Pneumococcal Vaccines
Pneumonia, Pneumococcal - prevention & control
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Social Marginalization
Syphilis - diagnosis
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - diagnosis
Urban Health Services
Viral Load
Abstract
To measure the effectiveness of implementing the chronic care model (CCM) in improving HIV clinical outcomes.
Multisite, prospective, interventional cohort study.
Two urban community health centres in Vancouver and Prince George, BC.
Two hundred sixty-nine HIV-positive patients (18 years of age or older) who received primary care at either of the study sites.
Systematic implementation of the CCM during an 18-month period.
Documented pneumococcal vaccination, documented syphilis screening, documented tuberculosis screening, antiretroviral treatment (ART) status, ART status with undetectable viral load, CD4 cell count of less than 200 cells/mL, and CD4 cell count of less than 200 cells/mL while not taking ART compared during a 36-month period.
Overall, 35% of participants were women and 59% were aboriginal persons. The mean age was 45 years and most participants had a history of injection drug use that was the presumed route of HIV transmission. During the study follow-up period, 39 people died, and 11 transferred to alternate care providers. Compared with their baseline clinical status, study participants showed statistically significant (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
23766052 View in PubMed
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Advanced cardiac life support in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178872
Source
N Engl J Med. 2004 Aug 12;351(7):647-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-12-2004
Author
Ian G Stiell
George A Wells
Brian Field
Daniel W Spaite
Lisa P Nesbitt
Valerie J De Maio
Graham Nichol
Donna Cousineau
Josée Blackburn
Doug Munkley
Lorraine Luinstra-Toohey
Tony Campeau
Eugene Dagnone
Marion Lyver
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medicine, Ottawa Health Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa Ont, Canada. istiell@ohri.ca
Source
N Engl J Med. 2004 Aug 12;351(7):647-56
Date
Aug-12-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Advanced Cardiac Life Support
Aged
Electric Countershock
Emergency medical services
Female
Heart Arrest - mortality - therapy
Hospitalization
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Survival Rate
Urban Health Services
Abstract
The Ontario Prehospital Advanced Life Support (OPALS) Study tested the incremental effect on the rate of survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of adding a program of advanced life support to a program of rapid defibrillation.
This multicenter, controlled clinical trial was conducted in 17 cities before and after advanced-life-support programs were instituted and enrolled 5638 patients who had had cardiac arrest outside the hospital. Of those patients, 1391 were enrolled during the rapid-defibrillation phase and 4247 during the subsequent advanced-life-support phase. Paramedics were trained in standard advanced life support, which includes endotracheal intubation and the administration of intravenous drugs.
From the rapid-defibrillation phase to the advanced-life-support phase, the rate of admission to a hospital increased significantly (10.9 percent vs. 14.6 percent, P
Notes
Comment In: N Engl J Med. 2004 Dec 9;351(24):2553-4; author reply 2553-415590963
PubMed ID
15306666 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and general practitioner access and utilization: a population based study in Sarnia, 'Chemical Valley,' Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132343
Source
Environ Health. 2011;10:71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Tor H Oiamo
Isaac N Luginaah
Dominic O Atari
Kevin M Gorey
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. thoiamo@uwo.ca
Source
Environ Health. 2011;10:71
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental monitoring
Female
General Practitioners - utilization
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - analysis - toxicity
Male
Middle Aged
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis - toxicity
Ontario
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis - toxicity
Urban Health Services - utilization
Volatile Organic Compounds - analysis - toxicity
Young Adult
Abstract
Health impacts of poor environmental quality have been identified in studies around the world and in Canada. While many of the studies have identified associations between air pollution and mortality or morbidity, few have focused on the role of health care as a potential moderator of impacts. This study assessed the determinants of health care access and utilization in the context of ambient air pollution in Sarnia, Ontario, Canada.
Residents of Sarnia participated in a Community Health Study administered by phone, while several ambient air pollutants including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2) and the volatile organic compounds benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, mp- and o-xylene (BTEX) were monitored across the city. Land Use Regression models were used to estimate individual exposures to the measured pollutants and logistic regression models were utilized to assess the relative influence of environmental, socioeconomic and health related covariates on general practitioner access and utilization outcomes.
The results show that general practitioner use increased with levels of exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2- Odds Ratio [OR]: 1.16, p 0.05).
This study provides evidence for inequitable health care access and utilization in Sarnia, with particular relevance to its situation as a sentinel high exposure environment. Levels of exposure to pollution appears to influence utilization of health care services, but poor access to primary health care services additionally burden certain groups in Sarnia, Ontario, Canada.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21827645 View in PubMed
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309 records – page 1 of 31.