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32 records – page 1 of 4.

[A 40-year study of aortic and coronary artery atherosclerosis in male population of Yakutsk]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76239
Source
Arkh Patol. 2006 Jan-Feb;68(1):6-10
Publication Type
Article
Author
O V Voronova
V S Zhdanov
V A Argunov
V P Alekseev
I E Galakhov
D V Iudakov
Source
Arkh Patol. 2006 Jan-Feb;68(1):6-10
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aorta - pathology
Comparative Study
Coronary Arteriosclerosis - epidemiology - pathology
English Abstract
Health Transition
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Siberia
Urban Health - trends
Abstract
The trends in development of aortic and coronary atherosclerosis in healthy male population were studied by WHO methods in three trials: in 1963-1965, 1985-1987, 2001-2003. It was found that atherosclerosis and coronary arteries stenosis were less frequent in the native population of Yakutia than in migrants.
PubMed ID
16544527 View in PubMed
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Availability and characteristics of nonbeverage alcohols sold in 17 Russian cities in 2007.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154144
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2009 Jan;33(1):79-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Artyom Gil
Olga Polikina
Natalia Koroleva
Martin McKee
Susannah Tomkins
David A Leon
Author Affiliation
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK.
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2009 Jan;33(1):79-85
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - economics - epidemiology - legislation & jurisprudence
Alcoholic Beverages - economics
Case-Control Studies
Cities - economics - epidemiology
Ethanol - administration & dosage - economics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Russia - epidemiology
Urban Health - trends
Abstract
It is known that a range of nonbeverage alcohols including eau-de-colognes and medicinal tinctures are consumed by sections of the Russian population. Research conducted in a city in the Urals (2003 to 2005) showed that consumption of such products is associated with very high mortality from a wide range of causes. However, there have been no systematic attempts to investigate the extent to which such products are available in other cities of the Russian Federation. There is particular interest in establishing this following the introduction of new federal regulations in January 2006 aimed at restricting the availability of these products.
In the first half of 2007, we conducted a survey in 17 cities that spanned the full range of city types in the Russian Federation excluding those in the Far East. In each city, fieldworkers visited pharmacies and other types of retail outlets and purchased samples of nonbeverage alcohols. These were defined as being typically 10 to 15 roubles per bottle, with an ethanol concentration of at least 60% by volume.
We were able to purchase samples of nonbeverage alcohols in each of the 17 cities we investigated. The majority of the 271 products included were a cheaper and more affordable source of ethanol than standard Russian vodka. Medicinal tinctures, sold almost exclusively in pharmacies, were particularly common with an average concentration of 78% ethanol by volume. Most importantly, the majority of the products were of a sort that our previous research in 2004 to 2005 had established were drunk by working-age men.
While the 2006 federal regulations introduced in part to reduce the availability and consumption of nonbeverage alcohols may have had some effect on certain classes of nonmedicinal products, up until June 2007 at least, medicinal tinctures as well as some other nonbeverage alcohols that are consumed appear to have been readily available.
Notes
Comment In: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2009 May;33(5):759-6019320624
PubMed ID
19018753 View in PubMed
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Caught in the "traps of managed competition"? Examples of Russian health care reforms from St. Petersburg and the Leningrad region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209857
Source
Int J Health Serv. 1997;27(4):661-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
S. Curtis
N. Petukhova
G. Sezonova
N. Netsenko
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, Queen Mary and Westfield College, University of London, England.
Source
Int J Health Serv. 1997;27(4):661-86
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Consumer Satisfaction
Developing Countries
Female
Forecasting
Health Care Reform - trends
Health Services Accessibility - trends
Humans
Male
Managed Competition - trends
Middle Aged
Russia
State Medicine - trends
Urban Health - trends
Abstract
Elements of a "managed market" for health services have been introduced into the Russian health care system, which under the Soviet regime was run as a comprehensive state-managed system. The authors examine the recent development of health service reforms in a case study of the city of St. Petersburg and the surrounding Leningrad region. Evidence from key informants and a local survey of service users shows how alternative models of the managed market are being introduced in different parts of the study area. A critical review of the market-oriented strategies for reform emerging in the case study suggests that such reforms carry risks associated with the "traps of managed competition." Future policy for health service systems in Russia must take these risks more fully into account.
PubMed ID
9399112 View in PubMed
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[Comparative hygienic evaluation of the interenvironmental distribution of trace elements in the environment].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148191
Source
Gig Sanit. 2009 Jul-Aug;(4):13-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
M V Boev
L A Perminova
N A Lestsova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2009 Jul-Aug;(4):13-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Environmental Health - methods
Humans
Hygiene
Retrospective Studies
Rural Health - trends
Russia
Trace Elements - analysis
Urban Health - trends
Abstract
The paper presents the results of long-term monitoring of the content and interenvironmental distribution of the chemical elements Ni, Cd, Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn, Fe, and Mn over 1993-2007 in the environmental objects. The studies were made in the urbanized and rural areas of the Orenburg and Orsk-Troitsk industrial centers. General regularities were found in the quantitative distribution and priority relationships of the elements in the drinking water, in the atmosphere of residential areas (snow cover), in soil, foodstuffs, and children's biomedia.
PubMed ID
19802940 View in PubMed
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Developing healthy communities. A five year project report from The Community Health Development Centre. Presented at The International Healthy Cities Conference. September 1994.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature232216
Source
Can J Public Health. 1988 Nov-Dec;79(6):416-9
Publication Type
Article

Effects of cold weather on mortality: results from 15 European cities within the PHEWE project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95479
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Dec 15;168(12):1397-408
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2008
Author
Analitis A.
Katsouyanni K.
Biggeri A.
Baccini M.
Forsberg B.
Bisanti L.
Kirchmayer U.
Ballester F.
Cadum E.
Goodman P G
Hojs A.
Sunyer J.
Tiittanen P.
Michelozzi P.
Author Affiliation
Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, Medical School, University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2008 Dec 15;168(12):1397-408
Date
Dec-15-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death - trends
Child
Child, Preschool
Cold Temperature - adverse effects
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Respiratory Tract Diseases - mortality
Risk factors
Urban Health - trends
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Weather-related health effects have attracted renewed interest because of the observed and predicted climate change. The authors studied the short-term effects of cold weather on mortality in 15 European cities. The effects of minimum apparent temperature on cause- and age-specific daily mortality were assessed for the cold season (October-March) by using data from 1990-2000. For city-specific analysis, the authors used Poisson regression and distributed lag models, controlling for potential confounders. Meta-regression models summarized the results and explored heterogeneity. A 1 degrees C decrease in temperature was associated with a 1.35% (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.16, 1.53) increase in the daily number of total natural deaths and a 1.72% (95% CI: 1.44, 2.01), 3.30% (95% CI: 2.61, 3.99), and 1.25% (95% CI: 0.77, 1.73) increase in cardiovascular, respiratory, and cerebrovascular deaths, respectively. The increase was greater for the older age groups. The cold effect was found to be greater in warmer (southern) cities and persisted up to 23 days, with no evidence of mortality displacement. Cold-related mortality is an important public health problem across Europe. It should not be underestimated by public health authorities because of the recent focus on heat-wave episodes.
PubMed ID
18952849 View in PubMed
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Fitness of Canadian children: range from traditional Inuit to sedentary city dwellers, and assessment of secular changes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78287
Source
Med Sport Sci. 2007;50:91-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Shephard Roy J
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Physical and Health Education and Department of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont., Canada. royjshep@shaw.ca
Source
Med Sport Sci. 2007;50:91-103
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body Composition
Body mass index
Canada
Child
Child Welfare - trends
Exercise
Female
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Motor Activity
Physical Fitness
Public Health - trends
Rural Health - trends
Sex Factors
Urban Health - trends
Abstract
Large amounts of motor performance test data have been collected in Canada, as in Europe and other countries, but even where representative population samples have been selected, interpretation of the findings is difficult, and most conclusions remain tenuous. Urban Canadian children apparently showed a small increase of physical performance from the mid- 1960s through to about 1980, related in part to intensive governmental promotion of physical fitness and changes in gender roles of female students over this period. The two most recent decades have been marked by a shift of focus to health-related tests, the results showing a small but progressive deterioration in health-related fitness, with an accumulation of body fat, as documented by increases in body mass indices and skinfold thicknesses. In 1970, the fitness levels of urban children were substantially inferior to that of Inuit students, living in the high arctic and practicing a traditional, physically active lifestyle. However, by 1990, the Inuit children had adopted many of the sedentary habits typical of Canadian city dwellers, and had lost much of their previous advantage. At this stage, most Canadian students were not reaching their fitness potential, but their physical condition could be enhanced - in urban centers by an augmented physical education programme, and in the Inuit community by participation in programmes of active leisure. At present, Canadian students seem to be somewhat more fit than those in the US, but less fit than their peers in some European countries. Nevertheless, international comparison of Canadian data is currently hampered by differences in measurement techniques and failure of many investigators to test representative population samples.
PubMed ID
17387253 View in PubMed
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A five-year trend of increasing obesity among elementary schoolchildren in multiethnic, low-income, inner-city neighborhoods in Montreal, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196926
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2000 Sep;24(9):1176-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
J. O'Loughlin
G. Paradis
G. Meshefedjian
K. Gray-Donald
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Régie régionale de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal-Centre, Quebec, Canada. joloug@po-box.mcgill.ca
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2000 Sep;24(9):1176-82
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Child
Child Welfare - trends
Cultural Diversity
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - ethnology
Poverty - statistics & numerical data - trends
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Health - trends
Weight Gain
Abstract
To describe the prevalence of overweight and obesity over 5 y among inner-city elementary schoolchildren aged 10-12 y in multiethnic, low-income neighborhoods in Montreal, Canada.
Height and weight of all students in grades 4-6 in 16 control schools participating in an evaluation of the impact of a school-based heart health promotion program, were measured each May/June from 1993 to 1997 in cross-sectional classroom-based school surveys.
The prevalence of overweight (> or = 85th age- and gender-specific percentile for body mass index (BMI) from NHANES I and II) was 35.9% in 1993; it increased by approximately 1.3% per year. The prevalence of obesity (> or = 95th age- and gender-specific percentile for BMI from NHANES I and II) was 15.9% in 1993; it increased by approximately 1.0% per year. In multivariate models predicting overweight and obesity, the odds ratios for year adjusted for age, sex, and family ethnic origin were 1.08 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04-1.12), and 1.09 (95%CI, 1.04-1.15), respectively.
There were significant secular trends of increasing overweight and obesity among young inner-city schoolchildren from the early to late 1990s. Preventive intervention is clearly indicated because childhood obesity tracks to adulthood and because obesity is associated with substantial morbidity, mortality and health care costs.
PubMed ID
11033987 View in PubMed
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Forearm bone mineral density and incidence of hip fractures in Swedish urban and rural men 1987-2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130403
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Feb;40(1):102-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Björn E Rosengren
Henrik G Ahlborg
Per Gärdsell
Ingemar Sernbo
Jan-Åke Nilsson
Robin M Daly
Magnus K Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Clinical and Molecular Osteoporosis Research Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. bjorn.rosengren@med.lu.se
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2012 Feb;40(1):102-8
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Density
Forearm
Hip Fractures - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Radius - physiology
Rural Health - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Health - trends
Abstract
It is not known whether the recently described break in the trend in hip fracture incidence in many settings applies in both women and men, depends on changes in bone mineral density (BMD) or changes in other risk factors, or whether it is apparent in both urban and rural settings.
We evaluated changes in annual hip fracture incidence from 1987 to 2002 in Swedish men aged =60 years in one urban (n?=?25,491) and one rural population (n?=?16,432) and also secular differences in BMD, measured by single-photon absorptiometry at the distal radius and multiple other risk factors for hip fracture in a population-based sub-sample of the urban and the rural men aged 60-80 years in 1988/89 (n?=?202 vs. 121) and in 1998/99 (n?=?79 vs. 69).
No statistically significant changes in the annual age-adjusted hip fracture incidence per 10,000 were apparent from 1987 to 2002 in urban (0.38 per year, 95% CI -0.12 to 0.88) or rural men (-0.05 per year, 95% CI -0.63 to 0.53). BMD was similar in 1988/89 and 1998/99 when examining both urban (-19.6?mg/cm(2), 95% CI -42.6 to 3.5) and rural (-23.0?mg/cm(2), 95% CI -52.1 to 6.1) men.
Since no secular change in age-adjusted hip fracture incidence was found during the study period, a levelling off in hip fracture incidence is present also in Swedish men. Because BMD on a group level was similar in 1988/89 and 1998/99, changes in other risk factors ought to be either of minor importance or counteracted by changes in different risk factors.
PubMed ID
22006168 View in PubMed
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The Greater Vancouver Mental Health Service Society: 20 years' experience in urban community mental health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220978
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1993 Jun;38(5):308-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
N. Sladen-Dew
D A Bigelow
R. Buckley
S. Bornemann
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1993 Jun;38(5):308-14
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
British Columbia
Child
Child Health Services - trends
Community Mental Health Services - trends
Deinstitutionalization - trends
Family Therapy - trends
Forecasting
Health Services for the Aged - trends
Humans
Mental Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Patient Care Team - trends
Social Adjustment
Societies, Medical - trends
Urban Health - trends
Abstract
Caring for people in the community with persistent and disabling mental illnesses presents a major challenge to government, planners and mental health professionals. The success with which mentally disabled people are integrated into community life says much about the society in which we live. This article describes the experience of the Greater Vancouver Mental Health Service Society in offering community-based mental health services to persons with schizophrenia and other major mental disorders over the past 20 years. The key to its success lies in a decentralized, relatively non hierarchical organizational structure which allows committed and skilled multidisciplinary teams to work with patients and their families in their community. The resulting services are fully integrated within the fabric of the community and are responsive to local needs. Partnerships among professionals, patients, families and community agencies result in work that is creative, productive and effective.
PubMed ID
8348468 View in PubMed
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32 records – page 1 of 4.