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Age dependence of natural uranium and thorium concentrations in bone.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165657
Source
Health Phys. 2007 Feb;92(2):119-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Dominic Larivière
Ana Paula Packer
Leonora Marro
Chunsheng Li
Jing Chen
R Jack Cornett
Author Affiliation
Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, 775 Brookfield Road, Address Locator 6302D1, Ottawa, ON, Canada, K1A. dominic_lariviere@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Health Phys. 2007 Feb;92(2):119-26
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Background Radiation
Body Burden
Bone and Bones - chemistry
Canada
Humans
Radiation Dosage
Radiometry - methods
Relative Biological Effectiveness
Thorium - analysis
Uranium - analysis
Abstract
The age dependence of the natural concentration of uranium and thorium in the skeleton was investigated using human vertebrae bone collected from two Canadian locations (Winnipeg, Manitoba, and Regina, Saskatchewan). The concentration of both radioelements in digested ashed bone samples was determined using sector-field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The geometric means for uranium level in bones showed a significant statistical difference between the two locations studied. Similarly for thorium, a statistical difference was observed, although this difference was considered marginal. The thorium concentration differed only marginally with respect to age group, indicating that its behavior in the body could be age-independent. Conversely, the uranium level in bones was found to change for the age groups tested, an indication of age-specific deposition. The age profile for uranium was comparable to the calcium turn-over rate, indicating that uranium deposition is probably, in part, dictated by this metabolic process, showing the role of present uptake into the uranium concentration in bones for populations exposed to significant uranium intake.
PubMed ID
17220713 View in PubMed
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An aerosol particle containing enriched uranium encountered in the remote upper troposphere.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289883
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2018 Apr; 184-185:95-100
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
D M Murphy
K D Froyd
E Apel
D Blake
N Blake
N Evangeliou
R S Hornbrook
J Peischl
E Ray
T B Ryerson
C Thompson
A Stohl
Author Affiliation
NOAA ESRL Chemical Sciences Division, Boulder, CO, USA. Electronic address: daniel.m.murphy@noaa.gov.
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2018 Apr; 184-185:95-100
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aerosols - analysis
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Alaska
Atmosphere - chemistry
Radiation monitoring
Uranium - analysis
Abstract
We describe a submicron aerosol particle sampled at an altitude of 7?km near the Aleutian Islands that contained a small percentage of enriched uranium oxide. 235U was 3.1?±?0.5% of 238U. During twenty years of aircraft sampling of millions of particles in the global atmosphere, we have rarely encountered a particle with a similarly high content of 238U and never a particle with enriched 235U. The bulk of the particle consisted of material consistent with combustion of heavy fuel oil. Analysis of wind trajectories and particle dispersion model results show that the particle could have originated from a variety of areas across Asia. The source of such a particle is unclear, and the particle is described here in case it indicates a novel source where enriched uranium was dispersed.
PubMed ID
29407642 View in PubMed
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An ecological study of cancer incidence in Port Hope, Ontario from 1992 to 2007.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117206
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2013 Mar;33(1):227-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Jing Chen
Deborah Moir
Rachel Lane
Patsy Thompson
Author Affiliation
Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, 2720 Riverside Drive, Ottawa, K1A 0K9, Canada. jing.chen@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2013 Mar;33(1):227-42
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mining - statistics & numerical data
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Radium - analysis
Risk assessment
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Uranium - analysis
Abstract
A plant processing radium and uranium ores has been operating in the town of Port Hope since 1932. Given the nuclear industry located in the community and ongoing public health concerns, cancer incidence rates in Port Hope were studied for a recent 16 year period (1992-2007) for continued periodic cancer incidence surveillance of the community. The cancer incidence in the local community for all cancers combined was similar to the Ontario population, health regions with similar socio-economic characteristics in Ontario and in Canada, and the Canadian population. No statistically significant differences in childhood cancer, leukaemia or other radiosensitive cancer incidence were observed, with the exception of statistically significant elevated lung cancer incidence among women. However, the statistical significance was reduced or disappeared when the comparison was made to populations with similar socio-economic characteristics. These findings are consistent with previous ecological, case-control and cohort studies conducted in Port Hope, environmental assessments, and epidemiological studies conducted elsewhere on populations living around similar facilities or exposed to similar environmental contaminants. Although the current study covered an extended period of time, the power to detect risk at the sub-regional level of analysis was limited since the Port Hope population is small (16,500). The study nevertheless indicated that large differences in cancer incidence are not occurring in Port Hope compared to other similar communities and the general population.
PubMed ID
23324463 View in PubMed
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Anthropogenic 236U in Danish Seawater: Global Fallout versus Reprocessing Discharge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287640
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Jun 20;51(12):6867-6876
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-2017
Author
Jixin Qiao
Peter Steier
Sven Nielsen
Xiaolin Hou
Per Roos
Robin Golser
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Jun 20;51(12):6867-6876
Date
Jun-20-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Atlantic Ocean
Baltic States
Denmark
Iodine Radioisotopes
North Sea
Oceans and Seas
Seawater
Uranium - analysis
Water pollutants, radioactive
Abstract
This work focuses on the occurrence of 236U in seawater along Danish coasts, which is the sole water-exchange region between the North Sea-Atlantic Ocean and the Baltic Sea. Seawater collected in 2013 and 2014 were analyzed for 236U (as well as 238U and 137Cs). Our results indicate that 236U concentrations in Danish seawater are distributed within a relatively narrow range of (3.6-8.2) × 107 atom/L and, to a certain extent, independent of salinity. 236U/238U atomic ratios in Danish seawater are more than 4 times higher than the estimated global fallout value of 1× 10-9. The levels of 236U/238U atomic ratios obtained are comparable to those reported for the open North Sea and much higher than several other open oceans worldwide. This indicates that besides the global fallout input, the discharges from the two major European nuclear reprocessing plants are dominating sources of 236U in Danish seawater. However, unexpectedly high 236U/238U ratios as well as high 236U concentrations were observed at low-salinity locations of the Baltic Sea. While this feature might be interpreted as a clue for another significant 236U input in the Baltic Sea, it may also be caused by the complexity of water currents or slow turnover rate.
PubMed ID
28505439 View in PubMed
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An unknown source of reactor radionuclides in the Baltic Sea revealed by multi-isotope fingerprints.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303598
Source
Nat Commun. 2021 02 05; 12(1):823
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-05-2021
Author
Jixin Qiao
Haitao Zhang
Peter Steier
Karin Hain
Xiaolin Hou
Vesa-Pekka Vartti
Gideon M Henderson
Mats Eriksson
Ala Aldahan
Göran Possnert
Robin Golser
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Risø Campus, Roskilde, Denmark. jiqi@env.dtu.dk.
Source
Nat Commun. 2021 02 05; 12(1):823
Date
02-05-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Baltic States
Humans
Radioactive fallout - analysis
Radioisotopes - analysis
Seawater - analysis
Sweden
Uranium - analysis
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
We present an application of multi-isotopic fingerprints (i.e., 236U/238U, 233U/236U, 236U/129I and 129I/127I) for the discovery of previously unrecognized sources of anthropogenic radioactivity. Our data indicate a source of reactor 236U in the Baltic Sea in addition to inputs from the two European reprocessing plants and global fallout. This additional reactor 236U may come from unreported discharges from Swedish nuclear research facilities as supported by high 236U levels in sediment nearby Studsvik, or from accidental leakages of spent nuclear fuel disposed on the Baltic seafloor, either reported or unreported. Such leakages would indicate problems with the radiological safety of seafloor disposal, and may be accompanied by releases of other radionuclides. The results demonstrate the high sensitivity of multi-isotopic tracer systems, especially the 233U/236U signature, to distinguish environmental emissions of unrevealed radioactive releases for nuclear safeguards, emergency preparedness and environmental tracer studies.
PubMed ID
33547296 View in PubMed
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Assessment of occupational exposure to uranium by indirect methods needs information on natural background variations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165079
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2007;125(1-4):492-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
M. Muikku
T. Heikkinen
M. Puhakainen
T. Rahola
L. Salonen
Author Affiliation
Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, P.O. Box 14, FIN-00881 Helsinki, Finland. maarit.muikku@stuk.fi
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2007;125(1-4):492-5
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Background Radiation
Biological Assay - methods
Computer simulation
Finland
Humans
Internationality
Models, Biological
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radiation Protection - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Uranium - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Abstract
Urine monitoring is the preferred method to determine exposure to soluble compounds of uranium in workplaces. The interpretation of uranium contents in workers bioassay samples requires knowledge on uranium excretion and its dependence on intake by diet. Exceptionally high concentrations of natural uranium in private drinking water sources have been measured in the granite areas of Southern Finland. Consequently, high concentrations of natural uranium have been observed in the urine and hair samples of people using water from their own drilled wells. Natural uranium content in urine and hair samples of family members, who use uranium-rich household water, have been analyzed by using ICP-MS. The uranium concentrations both in urine and hair samples of the study subjects were significantly higher than the world-wide average values. In addition, gammaspectrometric methods have been tested for determining uranium in hair samples. This method can be used only for samples with highly elevated uranium concentrations.
PubMed ID
17309870 View in PubMed
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Characterization of uranium and plutonium containing particles originating from the nuclear weapons accident in Thule, Greenland, 1968.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175887
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2005;81(1):21-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
O C Lind
B. Salbu
K. Janssens
K. Proost
H. Dahlgaard
Author Affiliation
Isotope Laboratory, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Norwegian 10 University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 As, Norway. ole-christian.lind@umb.no
Source
J Environ Radioact. 2005;81(1):21-32
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Aviation - statistics & numerical data
Autoradiography
Electron Probe Microanalysis
Elementary Particle Interactions
Geologic Sediments - analysis
Greenland
Humans
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Oxidation-Reduction
Particle Size
Plutonium - analysis - chemistry
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radioactive fallout - analysis
Radioactive Hazard Release - statistics & numerical data
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Spectrometry, Gamma
Synchrotrons
Uranium - analysis - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
To improve long-term radioecological impact assessment for the contaminated ecosystem of Bylot Sound, Greenland, U and Pu containing particles have been characterized with respect to particle size, elemental distribution, morphology and oxidation states. Based on scanning electron microscopy with XRMA, particles ranging from about 20 to 40 microm were isolated. XRMA and mu-XRF mapping demonstrated that U and Pu were homogeneously distributed throughout the particles, indicating that U and Pu have been fused. Furthermore, mu-XANES showed that U and Pu in the particles were present as mixed oxides. U was found to be in oxidation state IV whereas Pu apparently is a mixture of Pu(III) and Pu(IV). As previous assessments are based on PuO2 only, revisions should be made, taking Pu(III) into account.
PubMed ID
15748658 View in PubMed
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[Comparative analysis of natural uranium mobility and concentration process in ecosystems of the Pechora river basin].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113683
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2013 Jan-Feb;53(1):84-94
Publication Type
Article
Author
N G Rachkova
I I Shuktomova
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2013 Jan-Feb;53(1):84-94
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbonates - chemistry
Ecosystem
Environmental monitoring
Humans
Phosphates - chemistry
Radioactive waste
Rivers
Russia
Uranium - analysis - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis - chemistry
Abstract
Natural uranium mobility and its concentration process in water ecosystems of the Pechora river basin situated in the areas with the uranium increased concentration in rocks and in the zone around radioactive waste repository were compared. The study investigated the influence of the environmental factors on the uranium distribution in water reservoirs. In the studied ecosystems, Fe-bearing compounds are major sorbents of uranium during the migration and concentration process. Nitrate-ions increase the uranium mobility in the ecosystems. The influence of sulfate, phosphate and carbonate complexation on the uranium distribution between water and bottom sediments wasn't pronounced in the ecosystems with high natural radioactivity, but significant for the radioactively contaminated water reservoirs. Uranium geochemical mobility is higher in contaminated water ecosystems. The uranium content in the water from this area substantially exceeds the background value for the region and toxicity limits for hydrophytes. Comparison of the current and earlier received data shows that the uranium concentration in the water has decreased, its specific activity in sediments has enhanced. The level of the uranium concentration in dry hygrophyte biomass has not changed.
PubMed ID
23700839 View in PubMed
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A comparison of ICRP Publication 30 lung model-based predictions with measured bioassay data for airborne natural UO2 exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235012
Source
Health Phys. 1987 Jul;53(1):59-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1987
Author
K S Thind
Source
Health Phys. 1987 Jul;53(1):59-66
Date
Jul-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Air Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Biological Assay
Body Burden
Canada
Humans
Lung - analysis
Lymph - analysis
Models, Biological
Particle Size
Thorax - analysis
Uranium - analysis
Uranium Compounds
Urine - analysis
Abstract
In this paper a comparison is made between the build-up of U thorax burdens and the predicted total lung (lung and lymph) burden, based on the lung model provided in ICRP Publication 30 for a group of 29 atomic radiation workers at a Canadian fuel fabrication facility. A similar comparison is made between the predicted ratio of the total lung burden to urinary excretion and the ratio obtained from bioassay data. The study period for the comparison is 5 y. The inhalation input for the lung model calculations was derived from air-sampling data and the choice of particle size activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) was guided by particle size measurements made at representative work locations. The pulmonary clearance half-times studied were 100, 250 and 500 d. For the purpose of this comparison, averaged exposure and averaged bioassay data for the group were used. This comparison indicates that for the conditions of this facility, the assumption of a 500-d pulmonary clearance half-time and a particle size of 1 micron (AMAD) may be too conservative. It is suggested that measurements of air concentrations and particle size used as input parameters for the ICRP Publication 30 lung model may be used to calculate bioassay parameters which may then be tested against bioassay data obtained as part of an operational health physics program, thereby giving a useful step towards defining a derived air concentration value for U in the workplace.
PubMed ID
3597099 View in PubMed
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[Content of natural uranium in the lichens and distribution of forms in the soil at the coastal area of Lakes Itkul and Sinara of Chelyabinsk region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263701
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2014 Nov-Dec;54(6):632-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
A L Polyudina
V V Deryagin
S G Levina
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2014 Nov-Dec;54(6):632-40
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Lakes
Lichens - radiation effects
Russia
Soil Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Uranium - analysis
Abstract
The distribution of natural uranium in soils superaquatic and transeluvial positions of the coastal landscape of lakes Itkul and Sinara, and liches on this site.The necessity of analysis of the content item in accordance with its form of occurrence in the natural environment. The peculiarities of the migration, accumulation and distribution of uranium in soils of the mountain areas of the watersheds of lakes Itkul and Sinara are found. Identified of specificity species lichens on the content of uranium in the substrate.
PubMed ID
25980290 View in PubMed
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42 records – page 1 of 5.