Skip header and navigation

Refine By

133 records – page 1 of 14.

Admissions to a pediatric intensive care unit for status epilepticus: a 10-year experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218214
Source
Crit Care Med. 1994 May;22(5):827-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1994
Author
J. Lacroix
C. Deal
M. Gauthier
E. Rousseau
C A Farrell
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Sainte-Justine Hospital, Université de Montréal, Canada.
Source
Crit Care Med. 1994 May;22(5):827-32
Date
May-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Child, Preschool
Hospital Mortality
Hospitals, University - utilization
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care Units, Pediatric - utilization
Neurologic Examination
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data - trends
Prognosis
Quebec - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Status Epilepticus - classification - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Survival Rate
Abstract
To characterize the etiology, course, and prognosis in children admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit (ICU) for status epilepticus.
Retrospective, descriptive study.
Pediatric ICU in a university hospital.
One hundred forty-seven children admitted with status epilepticus.
None.
Status epilepticus was defined as a prolonged (> 30 mins) or repeated tonic or tonic-clonic seizure with a persistent altered state of consciousness. Over 10 yrs, 147 children 0 to 16 yrs of age (median 1; mean 3.4 +/- 3.9 [SD]) were admitted to a pediatric ICU for, or with, 153 episodes of status epilepticus. Status epilepticus was caused most often by epilepsy (n = 52), atypical febrile convulsions (n = 21), bacterial meningitis (n = 20), encephalitis (n = 20), intoxication (n = 8), or a metabolic disorder (n = 12). Two infants, 1 and 3 months of age, and a patient with intoxication by isoniazid, responded to pyridoxine. Among 114 previously normal children, 34 patients displayed a new neurologic problem on discharge from the ICU, among whom, 68% (23/34) still had some neurologic abnormality 1 yr after the episode of status epilepticus. Nine patients died during their ICU stay, mostly from underlying disease rather than from the status epilepticus itself. A normal neurologic status before status epilepticus and age
PubMed ID
8181292 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adverse reactions to the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine in new-born infants-an evaluation of the Danish strain 1331 SSI in a randomized clinical trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284676
Source
Vaccine. 2016 May 11;34(22):2477-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-11-2016
Author
Thomas Nørrelykke Nissen
Nina Marie Birk
Jesper Kjærgaard
Lisbeth Marianne Thøstesen
Gitte Thybo Pihl
Thomas Hoffmann
Dorthe Lisbeth Jeppesen
Poul-Erik Kofoed
Gorm Greisen
Christine Stabell Benn
Peter Aaby
Ole Pryds
Lone Graff Stensballe
Source
Vaccine. 2016 May 11;34(22):2477-82
Date
May-11-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
BCG Vaccine - adverse effects - immunology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitals, University
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Lymphadenitis - etiology
Male
Mortality
Mycobacterium bovis - immunology
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Vaccination
Abstract
To evaluate adverse reactions of the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Statens Serum Institut (SSI) (Danish strain 1331) used as intervention in a randomized clinical trial.
A randomized clinical multicenter trial, The Danish Calmette Study, randomizing newborns to BCG or no intervention. Follow-up until 13 months of age.
Pediatric and maternity wards at three Danish university hospitals.
All women planning to give birth at the three study sites (n=16,521) during the recruitment period were invited to participate in the study. Four thousand one hundred and eighty four families consented to participate and 4262 children, gestational age 32 weeks and above, were randomized: 2129 to BCG vaccine and 2133 to no vaccine. None of the participants withdrew because of adverse reactions.
Trial-registered adverse reactions after BCG vaccination at birth. Follow-up at 3 and 13 months by telephone interviews and clinical examinations.
Among the 2118 BCG-vaccinated children we registered no cases of severe unexpected adverse reaction related to BCG vaccination and no cases of disseminated BCG disease. Two cases of regional lymphadenitis were hospitalized and thus classified as serious adverse reactions related to BCG. The most severe adverse reactions were 10 cases of suppurative lymphadenitis. This was nearly a fivefold increase compared to what was expected based on the summary of product characteristics of the vaccine. All cases were treated conservatively and recovered. Six of 10 (60%) families of children experiencing suppurative lymphadenitis compared to 117/2071 (6%) of those with no lymphadenitis indicated that the vaccine had more adverse effects than expected (p-value
PubMed ID
27060379 View in PubMed
Less detail

Agreement between Cochrane Neonatal Group reviews and clinical guidelines for newborns at a Copenhagen University Hospital - a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79323
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2007 Jan;96(1):39-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Brok Jesper
Greisen Gorm
Jacobsen Thorkild
Gluud Lise L
Gluud Christian
Author Affiliation
The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group, Copenhagen Trial Unit, Centre for Clinical Intervention Research, Copenhagen University Hospital, H:S Rigshospitalet, Denmark. jbrok@ctu.rh.dk
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2007 Jan;96(1):39-43
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consensus
Denmark
Evidence-Based Medicine - methods
Hospitals, University
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Medical Audit
Neonatology - standards
Practice Guidelines - standards
Abstract
AIM: To assess the agreement between Cochrane Neonatal Group reviews and clinical guidelines of a University Neonatology Department, to evaluate the reasons for potential disagreements and to ascertain whether Cochrane reviews were considered for the guidelines development. METHODS: The recommendations in the reviews and guidelines were compared and classified as being in 'agreement', 'partial agreement' or 'disagreement'. The guideline authors were interviewed for reasons about disagreement and whether Cochrane reviews were considered during the guideline development. RESULTS: Agreement between reviews and guidelines was found for 133 interventions (77%), partial agreement for 31 interventions (18%) and disagreement for nine interventions (5%). Six interventions were recommended in the guidelines, but not in the reviews. Three interventions were recommended in the reviews, but not in the guidelines. Use of consensus statements, evidence on surrogate markers, observational studies, basic immunology and pathophysiological knowledge, expert opinion, economical constraints, reservations about the external validity and unawareness of reviews were reasons for disagreement. Cochrane reviews were rarely (22%) used during the guideline development. CONCLUSION: We found agreement between more than three quarters of Cochrane reviews and neonatal guidelines. However, few important disagreements occurred. Reviews were only used for guideline development in about a fifth of cases.
PubMed ID
17187601 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of perinatal mortality at a teaching hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 1999-2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79181
Source
Afr J Reprod Health. 2006 Aug;10(2):72-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Kidanto Hussein L
Massawe Siriel N
Nystrom Lennarth
Lindmark Gunilla
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. hkidanto@muchs.ac.tz
Source
Afr J Reprod Health. 2006 Aug;10(2):72-80
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Apgar score
Female
Health Surveys
Hospitals, University - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Tanzania - epidemiology
Abstract
We conducted a retrospective analysis of perinatal mortality at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH), Dar es Salaam, Tanzania 1999-2003 in order to categorise/classify perinatal deaths as well as to identify key factors in perinatal care that could be improved. Data were retrieved from the MNH obstetric database and causes of early neonatal deaths were traced from the neonatal ward register. The study includes all foetuses weighing =500g. A modified Nordic-Baltic classification was used for classification of perinatal deaths. Over a 5-year period there were 77,815 babies born with a perinatal mortality rate of 124 per 1000 births, 78% of which was labour related stillbirth. The PMR was 913/1000 for singleton births and 723/1000 for multiple births for babies weighing less than 1500 grams and 65/1000 for singleton births and 116/1000 for multiple births for babies weighing 2500 grams or more. Babies weighing less than 1500 grams contributed 26% of PMR, whereas 41% occurred in babies weighing 2500 grams or more. The majority (79%) of neonatal deaths had Apgar score
PubMed ID
17217119 View in PubMed
Less detail

An observational study of compliance with the Scandinavian guidelines for management of minimal, mild and moderate head injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125168
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Ben Heskestad
Knut Waterloo
Tor Ingebrigtsen
Bertil Romner
Marianne Efskind Harr
Eirik Helseth
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurosurgery, Oslo University Hospital-Ullevål, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:32
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Craniocerebral Trauma - diagnosis - therapy
Diagnostic Imaging
Disease Management
Female
Guideline Adherence
Hospitals, University
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Young Adult
Abstract
The Scandinavian guidelines for management of minimal, mild and moderate head injuries were developed to provide safe and cost effective assessment of head injured patients. In a previous study conducted one year after publication and implementation of the guidelines (2003), we showed low compliance, involving over-triage with computed tomography (CT) and hospital admissions. The aim of the present study was to investigate guideline compliance after an educational intervention.
We evaluated guideline compliance in the management of head injured patients referred to the University Hospital of Stavanger, Norway. The findings from the previous study in 2003 were communicated to the hospitals physicians, and a feed-back loop training program for guideline implementation was conducted. All patients managed during the months January through June in the years 2005, 2007 and 2009 were then identified with an electronic search in the hospitals patient administrative database, and the patient files were reviewed. Patients were classified according to the Head Injury Severity Scale, and the management was classified as compliant or not with the guideline.
The 1 180 patients were 759 (64%) males and 421 (36%) females with a mean age of 31.5 (range 0-97) years. Over all, 738 (63%) patients were managed in accordance with the guidelines and 442 (37%) were not. Compliance was not significantly different between minimal (56%) and mild (59%) injuries, while most moderate (93%) injuries were managed in accordance with the guidelines (p
Notes
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand. 1999 Dec;100(6):355-910589794
Cites: Emerg Med J. 2011 Sep;28(9):778-8221030548
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2000 Jul 13;343(2):100-510891517
Cites: Lancet. 2001 May 5;357(9266):1391-611356436
Cites: J Trauma. 2002 Jun;52(6):1202-912045655
Cites: Ann Pharmacother. 2003 Jul-Aug;37(7-8):1110-612841825
Cites: J Trauma. 2003 Dec;55(6):1029-3414676646
Cites: Neurosurgery. 1989 Jan;24(1):31-62927596
Cites: Brain Inj. 1995 Jul;9(5):437-447550215
Cites: Acta Neurol Scand. 1997 Jan;95(1):51-59048986
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 1997 Jul;30(1):14-229209219
Cites: Wien Klin Wochenschr. 2007 Feb;119(1-2):64-7117318752
Cites: J Trauma. 2007 Oct;63(4):841-7; discussion 847-818090015
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2008;(3):CD00439818646106
Cites: J Trauma. 2008 Dec;65(6):1309-1319077619
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2009 Oct;18(5):385-9219812102
Cites: J Trauma. 2000 Apr;48(4):760-610780615
PubMed ID
22510221 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A prospective study on acute poisonings presenting to the Emergency Department at Landspitali University Hospital in Iceland 2012].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285636
Source
Laeknabladid. 2017 Juni;103(6):275-280
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gudborg Audur Gudjonsdottir
Anna Maria Thordardottir
Jakob Kristinsson
Source
Laeknabladid. 2017 Juni;103(6):275-280
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home
Accidents, Occupational
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Hospital Mortality
Hospitals, University
Humans
Iceland
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Poisoning - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Prospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Suicide, Attempted
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to assess the incidence and type of toxic exposures presenting to the Emergency Department (ED) at Landspitali University Hospital in Iceland over one year and compare the results to another study performed eleven years before.
The study was prospective and included all visits due to acute poisoning to the ED between January 1, and December 31, 2012.
A total of 977 toxic exposures were documented. Females were 554 (57%) and males 423 (43%). The age range was from 2 months to 96 years old. More than half of the patients were under 30 years old. The majority of exposures occurred in private homes and ingestion was the most common route of exposure. Deliberate poisonings accounted for 66% of all the poisonings and 76% had drugs and/or alcohol as their main cause. Exposures to chemicals other than drugs were usually unintentional and 31% of them were occupational exposures. 80% of patients received treatment and were discharged from the ED, 20% were admitted to other departments, thereof 21% to ICU. Two patients died (0.2%).
A slight but statistically unsignificant increase in incidence was observed. Females outnumbered males. Self-poisonings by ingestion of drugs and/or alcohol accounted for the majority of cases. The age range was wide, but the incidence was higher with young people. Mortality was low. Key words: toxicology, acute poisoning, epidemiology, self-poisoning. Correspondence: Gudborg Audur Gudjonsdottir, gudborgg@gmail.com.
PubMed ID
28665287 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing population health care need using a claims-based ACG morbidity measure: a validation analysis in the Province of Manitoba.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187370
Source
Health Serv Res. 2002 Oct;37(5):1345-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2002
Author
Robert J Reid
Noralou P Roos
Leonard MacWilliam
Norman Frohlich
Charlyn Black
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Health Serv Res. 2002 Oct;37(5):1345-64
Date
Oct-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Censuses
Child
Child, Preschool
Data Collection
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Female
Health Services - utilization
Health status
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Mortality
Needs Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Population Surveillance - methods
Public Health Informatics
Small-Area Analysis
Universal Coverage
Abstract
To assess the ability of an Adjusted Clinical Group (ACG)-based morbidity measure to assess the overall health service needs of populations. Data Sources/Study Setting. Three population-based secondary data sources: registration and health service utilization data from fiscal year 1995-1996; mortality data from vital statistics reports from 1996-1999; and Canadian census data. The study included all continuously enrolled residents in the universal health care plan in Manitoba.
Using 60 small geographic areas as the units of analysis, we compared a population-based "ACG morbidity index," derived from individual ACG assignments in fiscal year 1995-1996, with the standardized mortality ratio (ages
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 2000 Oct 25;284(16):2061-911042754
Cites: Med Care. 1999 Jun;37(6 Suppl):JS27-4110409014
Cites: J Fam Pract. 2001 May;50(5):427-3211350708
Cites: Lancet. 1977 May 7;1(8019):997-867480
Cites: Community Med. 1979 Nov;1(4):275-81527310
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1980 Jun;34(2):134-87400726
Cites: Med Care. 1982 Mar;20(3):266-767078285
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1989;28(2):175-822928827
Cites: Community Med. 1989 Aug;11(3):173-862605886
Cites: Community Med. 1989 Nov;11(4):364-722634516
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1990 Dec;44(4):271-32277247
Cites: Health Serv Res. 1991 Apr;26(1):53-741901841
Cites: Med Care. 1991 May;29(5):452-721902278
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1991;33(4):489-5001948163
Cites: J Public Health Med. 1992 Jun;14(2):117-261515194
Cites: JAMA. 1993 Feb 10;269(6):787-928423663
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1993 Apr;36(8):1053-618475421
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1993 Mar-Apr;84(2):112-78334602
Cites: BMJ. 1994 May 21;308(6940):1363-68019229
Cites: JAMA. 1994 Sep 21;272(11):871-48078165
Cites: JAMA. 1994 Dec 28;272(24):1903-87990241
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1994 Nov;39(9):1189-2017801156
Cites: Inquiry. 1995 Spring;32(1):56-747713618
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1995 Mar;40(6):727-307747207
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1995 May;40(9):1181-927610425
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1995;24 Suppl 1:S96-1027558561
Cites: Med Care. 1995 Dec;33(12 Suppl):DS13-207500666
Cites: Med Care. 1995 Dec;33(12 Suppl):DS43-547500669
Cites: Health Serv Res. 1995 Dec;30(5):657-718537225
Cites: J Ambul Care Manage. 1996 Jan;19(1):60-8010154370
Cites: J Ambul Care Manage. 1996 Jan;19(1):86-910154372
Cites: Health Care Financ Rev. 1996 Spring;17(3):7-3310172665
Cites: Health Care Financ Rev. 1996 Spring;17(3):77-9910158737
Cites: Health Care Financ Rev. 1996 Spring;17(3):101-2810172666
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1996 May;42(9):1273-818733197
Cites: Med Care. 1996 Aug;34(8):798-8108709661
Cites: JAMA. 1996 Oct 23-30;276(16):1316-218861990
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1996 Oct;86(10):1401-58876508
Cites: Milbank Q. 1997;75(1):89-1119063301
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1997 Mar;44(6):833-589080566
Cites: BMJ. 1997 Oct 4;315(7112):875-89353512
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1998 Jun;46(12):1543-529672394
Cites: Inquiry. 1998 Summer;35(2):132-479719782
Cites: Med Care. 1999 Mar;37(3):238-4810098568
Cites: J Ambul Care Manage. 1998 Oct;21(4):29-5210387436
Cites: Med Care. 2001 Jan;39(1):86-9911176546
PubMed ID
12479500 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between socioeconomic status and survival among children with Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas in a universal health care system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119183
Source
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2013 Jul;60(7):1171-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Denise Darmawikarta
Jason D Pole
Sumit Gupta
Paul C Nathan
Mark Greenberg
Author Affiliation
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2013 Jul;60(7):1171-7
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Hodgkin Disease - mortality
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - mortality
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Socioeconomic Factors
Universal Coverage
Abstract
The association between socioeconomic status (SES) and cancer survival has been studied extensively in adults. However, little is known about this relationship in the pediatric population, specifically in jurisdictions with universal health care insurance programs. Our aim was to determine whether lower SES is associated with poorer survival in pediatric Hodgkin (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patients in Ontario.
All incident cases of HL and NHL in children between 0 and 14 years old diagnosed in Ontario between January 1st, 1985 and December 31st, 2006 were identified through the Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario Networked Information System. Neighborhood income quintile and material deprivation quintile at diagnosis were used as proxies for SES. Cox proportional hazards regressions were used to assess the association between SES and the risk of event-free or overall survival.
A total of 692 patients were included in the analysis: 302 HL and 390 NHL. SES was not associated with survival (overall or event-free) among HL and NHL patients (P > 0.05 for all four comparisons, i.e., HL/NHL, EFS/OS) after adjustment for age, sex, period of diagnosis, and disease stage. There were no differences in the distribution of disease stage across SES strata at the time of diagnosis. Similarly, the distribution of deaths among long-term survivors (survived =5 years from diagnosis) did not differ across SES strata (P > 0.05).
SES was not associated with risk of death among pediatric HL and NHL patients in Ontario. This was consistent through the cancer trajectory, including diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship.
PubMed ID
23129171 View in PubMed
Less detail

Avoidable mortality by neighbourhood income in Canada: 25 years after the establishment of universal health insurance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164564
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2007 Apr;61(4):287-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Paul D James
Russell Wilkins
Allan S Detsky
Peter Tugwell
Douglas G Manuel
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, G-119, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, ON M4N 3M5, Canada.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2007 Apr;61(4):287-96
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Delivery of Health Care
Female
Humans
Income
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality - trends
Myocardial Ischemia - mortality
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Universal Coverage
Abstract
To examine neighbourhood income differences in deaths amenable to medical care and public health over a 25-year period after the establishment of universal insurance for doctors and hospital services in Canada.
Data for census metropolitan areas were obtained from the Canadian Mortality Database and population censuses for the years 1971, 1986, 1991 and 1996. Deaths amenable to medical care, amenable to public health, from ischaemic heart disease and from other causes were considered. Data on deaths were grouped into neighbourhood income quintiles on the basis of the census tract percentage of population below Canada's low-income cut-offs.
From 1971 to 1996, differences between the richest and poorest quintiles in age-standardised expected years of life lost amenable to medical care decreased 60% (p
Notes
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2000 Jul;14(3):194-21010949211
Cites: Lancet. 1999 May 8;353(9164):1547-5710334252
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2001 Apr;91(4):632-611291379
Cites: Aust N Z J Public Health. 2001;25(1):12-2011297294
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Feb 15;153(4):363-7111207154
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2001 Mar-Apr;92(2):95-811338161
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2001 Aug;30(4):809-1711511609
Cites: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2001 Jul;15 Suppl 2:104-2311520404
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Sep 4;165(5):565-7011563208
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1999 Nov-Dec;90(6):377-8110680259
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1999 May 15;149(10):898-90710342798
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1999 Oct 28;341(18):1359-6710536129
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 2005 Aug;58(8):757-6216018910
Cites: CMAJ. 2000;162(9 Suppl):S5-1110813022
Cites: CMAJ. 2000;162(9 Suppl):S13-2410813023
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2000 Jul;51(1):123-3310817475
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2000 Aug 24;343(8):530-710954760
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2000 Sep;54(9):687-9110942448
Cites: Tob Control. 2001 Dec;10(4):317-2211740021
Cites: Stroke. 2002 Jan;33(1):268-7311779921
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2002 Nov;92(11):1768-7212406806
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2002 Dec;55(11):1905-2112406460
Cites: West J Nurs Res. 2002 Dec;24(8):887-90412469725
Cites: CMAJ. 2003 Feb 4;168(3):261-412566329
Cites: CMAJ. 2003 Feb 18;168(4):413-612591780
Cites: BMJ. 2003 Jun 28;326(7404):141912829553
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2003 Aug 21;349(8):804-1012930935
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2003 Dec;57(12):974-8014652265
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Sep 9;351(11):1137-4215356313
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Sep 11-17;364(9438):937-5215364185
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1976 Mar 11;294(11):582-8942758
Cites: Lancet. 1983 Mar 26;1(8326 Pt 1):691-66132049
Cites: Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1986 Feb 1;292(6516):295-3013080144
Cites: Lancet. 1986 Jan 25;1(8474):199-2022868216
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 1988 Jul;4 Suppl A:16A-20A3179799
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1988;27(9):889-943227384
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1989;29(3):369-762762863
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1988 Dec;42(4):325-323256573
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1990 Jun;44(2):106-112196328
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1992 May;82(5):703-101566949
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1992 Feb;45(2):175-821573434
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1993 Apr;22(2):255-618505181
Cites: Health Rep. 1993;5(2):143-568292755
Cites: Health Rep. 1993;5(2):157-778292756
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1993 Dec;47(6):491-68120506
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1995 Feb;24(1):165-767797339
Cites: Med Care. 1995 Dec;33(12 Suppl):DS21-427500668
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1996 Jun;25(3):560-78671557
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1996 Oct;49(10):1155-608826996
Cites: Prev Med. 1996 Nov-Dec;25(6):730-408936576
Cites: Milbank Q. 1997;75(1):89-1119063301
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1997 Mar;44(6):757-719080560
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 1997;18:341-789143723
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1997 Aug;45(3):383-979232733
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1997 Jul;87(7):1156-639240106
Cites: Prev Med. 1997 Jul-Aug;26(4):534-419245676
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 1997 Sep;13(6):613-229324206
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1998 Mar-Apr;89(2):137-419583258
Cites: Health Rep. 1998 Spring;9(4):19-29(Eng); 19-30(Fre)9836877
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1998 Sep 1;148(5):475-869737560
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1998 Jun;52(6):399-4059764262
Cites: Cancer Prev Control. 1998 Oct;2(5):236-4110093638
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2000 Jul-Aug;91(4):268-7310986783
PubMed ID
17372287 View in PubMed
Less detail

133 records – page 1 of 14.