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Assessing changes in a patient's condition - perspectives of intensive care nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302699
Source
Nurs Crit Care. 2017 03; 22(2):99-104
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2017
Author
Monica Kvande
Charlotte Delmar
Else Lykkeslet
Sissel Lisa Storli
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Care Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Nurs Crit Care. 2017 03; 22(2):99-104
Date
03-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Critical Care Nursing - methods
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration
Interviews as Topic
Male
Monitoring, Physiologic - methods
Norway
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Diagnosis - methods
Patient Safety
Qualitative Research
Abstract
To explore the phenomenon of assessing changes in patients' conditions in intensive care units from the perspectives of experienced intensive care nurses.
Providing safe care for patients in intensive care units requires an awareness and perception of the signs that indicate changes in a patient's condition. Nurses in intensive care units play an essential role in preventing the deterioration of a patient's condition and in improving patient outcomes.
This hermeneutic phenomenological study conducted close observations and in-depth interviews with 11 intensive care nurses. The nurses' experience ranged from 7 to 28 years in the intensive care unit. Data were collected at two intensive care units in two Norwegian university hospitals. The analysis was performed using the reflective methods of van Manen.
An overarching theme of 'sensitive situational attention' was identified, in which the nurses were sensitive in relation to a patient and understood the significance of a given situation. This theme was further unfolded in four subthemes: (1) being sensitive and emotionally present, (2) being systematic and concentrating, (3) being physically close to the bedside and (4) being trained and familiar with the routines.
Nurses understand each patient's situation and foresee clinical eventualities through a sensitive and attentive way of thinking and working. This requires nurses to be present at the bedside with both their senses (sight, hearing, smell and touch) and emotions and to work in a concentrated and systematic manner. Knowledge about the unique patient exists in interplay with past experiences and medical knowledge, which are essential for nurses to understand the situation.
Clinical practice should develop routines that enable nurses to be present at the bedside and to work in a concentrated and systematic manner. Furthermore, providing safe care requires nurses to be sensitive and attentive to each patient's unique situation.
PubMed ID
27651301 View in PubMed
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Association of belief in the "firewater myth" with strategies to avoid alcohol consequences among American Indian and Alaska Native college students who drink.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297404
Source
Psychol Addict Behav. 2018 06; 32(4):401-409
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2018
Author
Vivian M Gonzalez
Monica C Skewes
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Alaska Anchorage.
Source
Psychol Addict Behav. 2018 06; 32(4):401-409
Date
06-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska Natives - psychology
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Alcoholic Intoxication - psychology
Culture
Female
Harm Reduction
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups
Self Efficacy
Students - psychology
Universities
Young Adult
Abstract
Belief in an American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) specific biological vulnerability (BV) to alcohol problems (aka the "firewater myth") is associated with worse alcohol outcomes among AI/AN college students who drink, despite also being associated with greater attempts to reduce drinking. The current study examined how belief in a BV may have affected how 157 AI/AN college students who drink (a) attempted to moderate their alcohol use and avoid alcohol-related problems using abstinence-based and harm reduction strategies, and (b) attitudes toward these strategies as a means of addressing alcohol problems. Contrary to our hypotheses, belief in a BV was not found to be associated with use of harm reduction strategies or with how effective students believed these strategies to be. However, greater belief in a BV was associated with lower self-efficacy for the use of harm reduction strategies among more frequent heavy episodic drinkers. This is concerning, as the use of harm reduction strategies was associated with less frequent heavy episodic drinking in this sample. In contrast, belief in a BV was positively associated with the use of abstinence-based strategies and with how effective these strategies were perceived to be. However, for individuals with average or greater belief in a BV, abstinence-based strategies were associated with greater alcohol consequences. The results suggest that for AI/AN students who drink, belief in a BV may be influencing the strategies used to moderate alcohol use and avoid alcohol-related harm, as well as attitudes toward these strategies, in ways that do not appear helpful. (PsycINFO Database Record
PubMed ID
29723011 View in PubMed
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The factors associated with medication errors in adult medical and surgical inpatients: a direct observation approach with medication record reviews.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290165
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Jun; 29(2):297-306
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
Jun-2015
Author
Marja Härkänen
Jouni Ahonen
Marjo Kervinen
Hannele Turunen
Katri Vehviläinen-Julkunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2015 Jun; 29(2):297-306
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Clinical Competence
Cross-Sectional Studies
Documentation
Female
Finland
Hospitals, University - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inpatients
Male
Medication Errors - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Nurses - standards - statistics & numerical data
Nursing Staff, Hospital - standards - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Observing real situations in clinical practice can provide undetected information regarding problems in the medication process.
The aims of this study were to describe the frequency, types, and severity of medication errors in medical and surgical inpatients as well as to study the relationship between medication errors and associating factors.
A cross-sectional study using direct observations and medication record reviews was conducted to assess how 32 registered nurses administered 1058 medications to 122 inpatients in four medical and surgical wards at a university hospital in Finland between April and May 2012. Observations were recorded using a structured observation form and patients' medication record reviews (n = 122) before and after the observations were conducted. A multiprofessional team analysed and classified all of the detected errors and assessed their severity. A logistic regression was used to analyse the factors (work environment, team, person-specific, patient-specific or medication-related) associated with medication errors.
At least one error was found in 22.2% (235/1058) of administered medications, 63.4% of which were medication administration errors and 18.3% of which were documentation errors. Of the medication administration errors, 59.1% involved an incorrect administration technique. 3.4% of errors caused harm to patients. Statistically significant factors that increased the risk of medication errors included every other weekday, except Sunday; morning shifts; increased rushes; nurses asking for help; and increased number of medications that patients used. Factors that decreased the risk of errors included administering medications through an oral route, double-checking the drugs, and additional people in the medication room at the same time.
Medication errors in inpatient care are frequent, and improvements to increase safety are vital. More attention to medication administration techniques, administration instructions and attitudes toward safety are needed to prevent problems.
PubMed ID
25213297 View in PubMed
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"Freshman's week": characteristics associated with participation and experiencing adverse effects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296082
Source
Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy. 2018 05 29; 13(1):21
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-29-2018
Author
E K Erevik
S Pallesen
Ø Vedaa
C S Andreassen
T Torsheim
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychosocial Science, University of Bergen, PO. Box. 7807, 5020, Bergen, Norway. eilin.erevik@uib.no.
Source
Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy. 2018 05 29; 13(1):21
Date
05-29-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcohol Drinking in College - psychology
Ceremonial Behavior
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Risk factors
Students - psychology
Universities
Young Adult
Abstract
"Freshman's week" (FW) is a Norwegian initiation ritual to higher education. Previous research has suggested that FW-participation is associated with better social adjustment to the student setting, as well as heavy alcohol use both during and after the event. In this study, we aimed to identify characteristics associated with participation in FW and characteristics associated with experiencing adverse effects of alcohol use during FW.
Students in the city of Bergen, Norway participated in a survey during fall 2015, shortly after FW. The current sample consisted of the first-year students (N?=?4, 401, estimated response rate: 49%). The sample's mean age was 24 years (range: 17-73 years), 65% were females, and the majority were born in Norway (93%). Logistic regressions were conducted to identify characteristics associated with participation in FW and experiencing adverse effects.
A total of 64% of the first-year students reported participation in FW, and 27% of these reported experiencing at least one adverse alcohol-related effect during FW. Participation in FW was positively associated with being single (OR?=?1.29), extroversion (OR?=?1.18), and alcohol use (OR?=?1.28), and inversely associated with age (OR?=?0.70), and having children (OR?=?0.36). Several characteristics (e.g., alcohol use (OR?=?1.84), extroversion (OR?=?0.60), symptoms of depression (OR?=?1.60)) were associated with an increased risk of experiencing adverse effects of alcohol use during participation.
The current results suggest that initiatives for increasing the participation rate in FW, reducing alcohol use during FW, and decreasing the occurrence of adverse alcohol effects during FW are warranted. Aiming to reduce the focus on alcohol use during FW, and seeking to make FW more available and enjoyable for students with other priorities, students who do not match the stereotype of the typical first-year student, and less sociable students, might both increase participation rate and prevent the occurrence of adverse alcohol effects. Future studies should aim to develop and assess interventions designed to increase participation in FW and reduce the occurrence of adverse effects related to participation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29843744 View in PubMed
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The impact of education on the probability of receiving periodontal treatment. Causal effects measured by using the introduction of a school reform in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291734
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2017 09; 188:128-136
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2017
Author
Jostein Grytten
Irene Skau
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: josteing@odont.uio.no.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2017 09; 188:128-136
Date
09-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data - trends
Educational Status
Female
Government Programs - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Norway
Periodontics - statistics & numerical data
Probability
Students - statistics & numerical data
Universal Coverage - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to estimate the causal effect of education on the probability of receiving periodontal treatment in the adult Norwegian population. In Norway, a substantial part of the cost of periodontal treatment is subsidized by the National Insurance Scheme. In that case, one might expect that the influence of individual resources, such as education, on receiving treatment would be reduced or eliminated. Causal effects were estimated by using data on a school reform in Norway. During the period 1960-1972, all municipalities in Norway were required to increase the number of compulsory years of schooling from seven to nine years. The education reform was used to create exogenous variation in the education variable. The education data were combined with large sets of data from the Norwegian Health Economics Administration and Statistics Norway. Since municipalities implemented the reform at different times, we have both cross-sectional and time-series variation in the reform instrument. Thus we were able to estimate the effect of education on the probability of receiving periodontal treatment by controlling for municipality fixed effects and trend variables. The probability of receiving periodontal treatment increased by 1.4-1.8 percentage points per additional year of schooling. This is a reasonably strong effect, which indicates that policies to increase the level of education in the population can be an effective tool to improve oral health, including periodontal health.
PubMed ID
28753463 View in PubMed
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Modeling the mental health service utilization decisions of university undergraduates: A discrete choice conjoint experiment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299230
Source
J Am Coll Health. 2017 Aug-Sep; 65(6):389-399
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Author
Charles E Cunningham
Robert B Zipursky
Bruce K Christensen
Peter J Bieling
Victoria Madsen
Heather Rimas
Stephanie Mielko
Fiona Wilson
Ivana Furimsky
Lisa Jeffs
Catharine Munn
Author Affiliation
a Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences , McMaster University , Hamilton , Ontario , Canada.
Source
J Am Coll Health. 2017 Aug-Sep; 65(6):389-399
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Health
Decision Making
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Mental health
Student Health Services
Students - psychology
Universities
Abstract
We modeled design factors influencing the intent to use a university mental health service.
Between November 2012 and October 2014, 909 undergraduates participated.
Using a discrete choice experiment, participants chose between hypothetical campus mental health services.
Latent class analysis identified three segments. A Psychological/Psychiatric Service segment (45.5%) was most likely to contact campus health services delivered by psychologists or psychiatrists. An Alternative Service segment (39.3%) preferred to talk to peer-counselors who had experienced mental health problems. A Hesitant segment (15.2%) reported greater distress but seemed less intent on seeking help. They preferred services delivered by psychologists or psychiatrists. Simulations predicted that, rather than waiting for standard counseling, the Alternative Service segment would prefer immediate access to E-Mental health. The Usual Care and Hesitant segments would wait 6 months for standard counseling.
E-Mental Health options could engage students who may not wait for standard services.
PubMed ID
28511031 View in PubMed
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Modularising outpatient care delivery: A mixed methods case study at a Finnish University Hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299931
Source
Health Serv Manage Res. 2018 11; 31(4):195-204
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-2018
Author
Katariina Silander
Paulus Torkki
Antti Peltokorpi
Aino Lepäntalo
Maija Tarkkanen
Petri Bono
Katariina Klintrup
Minna Kaila
Author Affiliation
1 Aalto University, Espoo, Finland.
Source
Health Serv Manage Res. 2018 11; 31(4):195-204
Date
11-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care
Delivery of Health Care - standards
Female
Finland
Health Personnel
Hospitals, University
Humans
Male
Pregnancy
Abstract
Modularisation is a potential means to develop health care delivery by combining standardisation and customisation. However, little is known about the effects of modularisation on hospital care. The objective was to analyse how modularisation may change and support health care delivery in specialised hospital care.
A mixed methods case study methodology was applied using both qualitative and quantitative data, including interviews, field notes, documents, service usage data, bed count and personnel resource data. Data from a reference hospital's unit were used to understand the context and development of care delivery in general.
The following outcome themes were identified from the interviews: balance between demand and supply; support in shift from inpatient to outpatient care; shorter treatment times and improved management of service production. Modularisation supported the shift from inpatient towards outpatient care. Changes in resource efficiency measures were both positive and negative; the number of patients per personnel decreased, while the number of visits per personnel and the bed utilisation rate increased.
Modularisation may support health care providers in classifying patients and delivering services according to patients' needs. However, as the findings are based on a single university hospital case study, more research is needed.
PubMed ID
29336174 View in PubMed
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Pinocchio testing in the forensic analysis of waiting lists: using public waiting list data from Finland and Spain for testing Newcomb-Benford's Law.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300072
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 05 09; 8(5):e022079
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-09-2018
Author
Jaime Pinilla
Beatriz G López-Valcárcel
Christian González-Martel
Salvador Peiro
Author Affiliation
Departamento de Métodos Cuantitativos en Economía y Gestión, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria - Campus de Tafira, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain.
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 05 09; 8(5):e022079
Date
05-09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Finland
Humans
National Health Programs
Probability
Research Design
Spain
Statistics as Topic - methods
Universal Health Insurance
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Newcomb-Benford's Law (NBL) proposes a regular distribution for first digits, second digits and digit combinations applicable to many different naturally occurring sources of data. Testing deviations from NBL is used in many datasets as a screening tool for identifying data trustworthiness problems. This study aims to compare public available waiting lists (WL) data from Finland and Spain for testing NBL as an instrument to flag up potential manipulation in WLs.
Analysis of the frequency of Finnish and Spanish WLs first digits to determine if their distribution is similar to the pattern documented by NBL. Deviations from the expected first digit frequency were analysed using Pearson's ?2, mean absolute deviation and Kuiper tests.
Publicly available WL data from Finland and Spain, two countries with universal health insurance and National Health Systems but characterised by different levels of transparency and good governance standards.
Adjustment of the observed distribution of the numbers reported in Finnish and Spanish WL data to the expected distribution according to NBL.
WL data reported by the Finnish health system fits first digit NBL according to all statistical tests used (p=0.6519 in ?2 test). For Spanish data, this hypothesis was rejected in all tests (p
PubMed ID
29743333 View in PubMed
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Prognostic, predictive, and pharmacogenomic assessments of CDX2 refine stratification of colorectal cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302781
Source
Mol Oncol. 2018 09; 12(9):1639-1655
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2018
Author
Jarle Bruun
Anita Sveen
Rita Barros
Peter W Eide
Ina Eilertsen
Matthias Kolberg
Teijo Pellinen
Leonor David
Aud Svindland
Olli Kallioniemi
Marianne G Guren
Arild Nesbakken
Raquel Almeida
Ragnhild A Lothe
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Oncology, Institute for Cancer Research, the Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Norway.
Source
Mol Oncol. 2018 09; 12(9):1639-1655
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Biomarkers, Tumor - genetics
CDX2 Transcription Factor - genetics
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Colorectal Neoplasms - drug therapy - genetics - mortality - pathology
Disease-Free Survival
Female
Gene Expression
Hospitals, University
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Microsatellite Instability
Multivariate Analysis
Mutation
Neoplasm Staging
Norway
Pharmacogenomic Testing
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Proto-Oncogene Proteins B-raf - genetics
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Abstract
We aimed to refine the value of CDX2 as an independent prognostic and predictive biomarker in colorectal cancer (CRC) according to disease stage and chemotherapy sensitivity in preclinical models. CDX2 expression was evaluated in 1045 stage I-IV primary CRCs by gene expression (n = 403) or immunohistochemistry (n = 642) and in relation to 5-year relapse-free survival (RFS), overall survival (OS), and chemotherapy. Pharmacogenomic associations between CDX2 expression and 69 chemotherapeutics were assessed by drug screening of 35 CRC cell lines. CDX2 expression was lost in 11.6% of cases and showed independent poor prognostic value in multivariable models. For individual stages, CDX2 was prognostic only in stage IV, independent of chemotherapy. Among stage I-III patients not treated in an adjuvant setting, CDX2 loss was associated with a particularly poor survival in the BRAF-mutated subgroup, but prognostic value was independent of microsatellite instability status and the consensus molecular subtypes. In stage III, the 5-year RFS rate was higher among patients with loss of CDX2 who received adjuvant chemotherapy than among patients who did not. The CDX2-negative cell lines were significantly more sensitive to chemotherapeutics than CDX2-positive cells, and the multidrug resistance genes MDR1 and CFTR were significantly downregulated both in CDX2-negative cells and in patient tumors. Loss of CDX2 in CRC is an adverse prognostic biomarker only in stage IV disease and appears to be associated with benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy in stage III. Early-stage patients not qualifying for chemotherapy might be reconsidered for such treatment if their tumor has loss of CDX2 and mutated BRAF.
PubMed ID
29900672 View in PubMed
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Stability of personality traits over a five-year period in Swedish patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorder and non-psychotic individuals: a study using the Swedish universities scales of personality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293445
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2018 02 27; 18(1):54
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-27-2018
Author
Tomas Fagerberg
Erik Söderman
J Petter Gustavsson
Ingrid Agartz
Erik G Jönsson
Author Affiliation
Human Brain Informatics (HUBIN), Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatric Research, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Institutet and Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Tomas.Fagerberg@ki.se.
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2018 02 27; 18(1):54
Date
02-27-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Personality
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Personality Inventory - standards
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Universities
Abstract
Personality is considered as an important aspect in persons with psychotic disorders. Several studies have investigated personality in schizophrenia. However, no study has investigated stability of personality traits exceeding three years in patients with schizophrenia. This study aims to investigate the stability of personality traits over a five-year period among patients with schizophrenia and non-psychotic individuals and to evaluate case-control differences.
Patients with psychotic disorders (n?=?36) and non-psychotic individuals (n?=?76) completed Swedish universities Scales of Personality (SSP) at two occasions five years apart. SSP scores were analysed for effect of time and case-control differences by multiple analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) and within-subjects correlation.
MANCOVA within-subjects analysis did not show any effect of time. Thus, SSP mean scale scores did not significantly vary during the five-year interval. Within subject correlations (Spearman) ranged 0.30-0.68 and 0.54-0.75 for the different SSP scales in patients and controls, respectively. Patients scored higher than controls in SSP scales Somatic Trait Anxiety, Psychic Trait Anxiety, Stress Susceptibility, Lack of Assertiveness, Detachment, Embitterment, and Mistrust.
The stability of the SSP personality trait was reasonably high among patients with psychotic disorder, although lower than among non-psychotic individuals, which is in accordance with previous research.
PubMed ID
29486736 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.