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Association of risk variants for type 2 diabetes and hyperglycemia with gestational diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113138
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2013 Sep;169(3):291-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Hanna Huopio
Henna Cederberg
Jagadish Vangipurapu
Heidi Hakkarainen
Mirja Pääkkönen
Teemu Kuulasmaa
Seppo Heinonen
Markku Laakso
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2013 Sep;169(3):291-7
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - genetics - metabolism
Diabetes, Gestational - blood - genetics - metabolism
Down-Regulation
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic Association Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Glucose Tolerance Test
Hospitals, University
Humans
Hyperglycemia - blood - genetics - metabolism
Insulin - blood - secretion
Insulin-Secreting Cells - secretion
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Pregnancy
Receptor, Melatonin, MT1 - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the association of risk variants for type 2 diabetes (T2D) and hyperglycemia with gestational diabetes (GDM).
Five hundred and thirty-three Finnish women who were diagnosed with GDM and 407 controls with normal glucose tolerance during the pregnancy were genotyped for 69 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) which have been previously verified as susceptibility risk variants for T2D and hyperglycemia. All participants underwent an oral glucose tolerance test at the follow-up study after the index pregnancy.
Risk variants rs10830963 and rs1387153 of MTNR1B were significantly associated with GDM (odds ratio (OR)=1.62 (95% CI 1.34-1.96), P=4.5 × 10?7 and 1.38 (1.14-1.66), P=7.6 × 10?4 respectively). Both SNPs of MTNR1B were also significantly associated with elevated fasting glucose level and reduced insulin secretion at follow-up. Additionally, risk variants rs9939609 of FTO, rs2796441 of TLE1, rs560887 of G6PC2, rs780094 of GCKR, rs7903146 of TCF7L2 and rs11708067 of ADCY5 showed nominally significant associations with GDM (OR range from 1.25 to 1.30).
Our study suggests that GDM and T2D share a similar genetic background. Our findings also provide further evidence that risk variants of MTNR1B are associated with GDM by increasing fasting plasma glucose and decreasing insulin secretion.
PubMed ID
23761423 View in PubMed
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Decreased PAPP-A is associated with preeclampsia, premature delivery and small for gestational age infants but not with placental abruption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135394
Source
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2011 Jul;157(1):48-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Jenni K Ranta
Kaisa Raatikainen
Jarkko Romppanen
Kari Pulkki
Seppo Heinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Chemistry, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Eastern Finland and Eastern Finland Laboratory Centre, P.O. Box 1700, 70211 Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol. 2011 Jul;157(1):48-52
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abruptio Placentae - epidemiology
Adult
Biological Markers - blood
Chorionic Gonadotropin, beta Subunit, Human - blood
Cohort Studies
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitals, University
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Pre-Eclampsia - blood - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First - blood
Pregnancy-Associated Plasma Protein-A - analysis
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
To investigate links between first trimester Down's syndrome screening markers and adverse pregnancy outcomes; preeclampsia (PE), small for gestational age (SGA), preterm delivery (PD) and placental abruption (PA) in spontaneous, chromosomally normal pregnancies.
Cohort study in a university hospital. Data during pregnancy were routinely collected from a total study population of 2844 pregnant women between 2005 and 2007. Four study groups were pregnancies with PE (N=175), PA (N=17), PD (N=213) and SGA (N=275) plus a reference group with normal outcome (N=2164). The median MOMs of maternal serum concentrations of pregnancy associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) and free beta human chorionic gonadotropin (fß-hCG) were compared using two-tailed pooled t-tests, continuous variables were compared using Student's two-way t-tests, and Chi-square tests were used to analyse dichotomous variables. Fisher's exact test was used when there were fewer than five units in any of the classes.
The median MOM of maternal serum PAPP-A was significantly lower in women with PE, PD and SGA (0.79, 0.80 and 0.79 MOM, respectively) than in the reference group (0.99 MOM) (p
PubMed ID
21482016 View in PubMed
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Does unemployment in family affect pregnancy outcome in conditions of high quality maternity care?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170520
Source
BMC Public Health. 2006;6:46
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Kaisa Raatikainen
Nonna Heiskanen
Seppo Heinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Kuopio University Hospital, PO Box 1777, 70211 Kuopio, Finland. kaisa.e.raatikainen@kuh.fi
Source
BMC Public Health. 2006;6:46
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Anemia - epidemiology
Birth weight
Fathers - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Status Indicators
Hospitals, University
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Marital status
Maternal Health Services - economics - utilization
Mothers - statistics & numerical data
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Pregnancy in Adolescence - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Unemployment - statistics & numerical data
Universal Coverage
Abstract
The influence of unemployment in the family on pregnancy outcome is controversial. Only a few studies have involved investigation of the effect of unemployment of the father on pregnancy. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of unemployment of one or both parents on obstetric outcome in conditions of free antenatal care attended by the entire pregnant population.
The data of 24,939 pregnancies included maternal risk factors, pregnancy characteristics and outcome, and was based on a self administered questionnaire at 20 weeks of pregnancy and on clinical records.
Unemployment was associated with adolescent maternal age, unmarried status and overweight, anemia, smoking, alcohol consumption and prior pregnancy terminations. Multivariate logistic regression analysis indicated that after controlling for these maternal risk factors small differences only were found in pregnancy outcomes between unemployed and employed families. Unemployed women had significantly more often small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infants, at an OR of 1.26 (95% CI: 1.12-1.42) whereas, in families where both parents were unemployed, the risk of SGA was even higher at an OR of 1.43 (95% CI: 1.18-1.73). Otherwise, pregnancy outcome was comparable in the groups studied.
Free antenatal care was unable to fully overcome the adverse pregnancy outcomes associated with unemployment, SGA risk being highest when both parents are unemployed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16504118 View in PubMed
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Need for and consequences of episiotomy in vaginal birth: a critical approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155098
Source
Midwifery. 2010 Jun;26(3):348-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Sari Räisänen
Katri Vehviläinen-Julkunen
Seppo Heinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Kuopio, Kuopio University Hospital, PL 1777, 70211 Kuopio, Finland. shraisan@hytti.uku.fi
Source
Midwifery. 2010 Jun;26(3):348-56
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delivery, Obstetric - methods - statistics & numerical data
Episiotomy - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Maternity
Hospitals, University
Humans
Labor, Induced - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Nurse Midwives - organization & administration
Obstetric Labor Complications - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Parity
Patient Positioning - statistics & numerical data
Patient Selection
Perineum - injuries
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
to describe and explain the short-term effects of lateral episiotomy, and determine the factors associated with more/less common use of episiotomy.
prospective cross-sectional survey using a postal questionnaire.
the study was conducted at two university hospitals and one regional hospital in Finland between October and December 2006. The hospitals were chosen using cluster sampling. The sample consisted of 1000 vaginal births, and data were collected using questionnaires which were completed by midwives or student midwives. The overall response rate was 88%.
midwives or student midwives who took care of the women in labour provided information about childbearing women (n=879), obstetric factors and details of staff experience.
episiotomies were more common among primiparous than multiparous women (55% vs 12%, p0.001). More common use of episiotomy was also associated with induced births compared with spontaneous births in primiparous women (66% vs 53%, p=0.036), assisted vaginal births in all women (89% vs 25%, p0.001), and a prolonged active second stage of labour and epidural analgesia (17% vs 10%, p=0.036) in multiparous women. Correspondingly, episiotomies were less common among primiparous (44% vs 57%, p=0.041) and multiparous (7% vs 16%, p=0.003) women using spontaneous pushing compared with coached pushing. In the active second stage of labour, alternative birth positions (lateral, squatting, all fours, sitting) were associated with less common use of episiotomy than half-sitting or lithotomy positions among primiparous women (22% vs 48% vs 85%, p0.001). There were no differences between primiparous women with and without episiotomy in low Apgar score at 1minute (10.6% vs 6.4%, p=0.131) or 5minutes (1.8% vs 1.1%, p=0.557), or between multiparous women with and without episiotomy in low Apgar score at 1minute (1.9% vs 2.2%, p=0.855) or 5minutes (0% vs 0.5%, p=0.603). There were more first- and second-degree perineal injuries as well as injuries to the vagina, labia minora and urethra in births performed without episiotomies among primiparous women (p0.001). Correspondingly, third-degree perineal injuries were more common if episiotomy was performed in both primiparous (2.2% vs 1.6%) and multiparous women (3.7% vs 0%). The maternity hospital was the most significant determinant of the episiotomy rate (odds ratio 1 vs 1.9 vs 2.6, p=0.049).
episiotomy rates can be reduced without causing harm to women or newborn babies. Episiotomies can be avoided if induction and vacuum assistance are used sparingly, and if spontaneous pushing techniques and alternative birth positions (lateral, sitting, squatting, all fours) are used more often during labour.
Notes
Comment In: Pract Midwife. 2011 Jul-Aug;14(7):38-4021853704
PubMed ID
18804317 View in PubMed
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Obstetric outcome in post-term pregnancies: time for reappraisal in clinical management.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168504
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2006;85(7):805-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Minna Hovi
Kaisa Raatikainen
Nonna Heiskanen
Seppo Heinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2006;85(7):805-9
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gestational Age
Hospitals, University
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Perinatal Care - standards
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy, Prolonged - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control - therapy
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The objective of this study was to determine the outcome of pregnancy in post-term cases compared with term cases in a well defined population receiving modern obstetric care.
We utilized the population-based birth registry data of the Kuopio University Hospital (1990-2000) to investigate pregnancy outcome in 1,678 post-term singleton pregnancies. The general obstetric population (n=22,712) was used as a reference group in logistic regression analysis.
The overall frequency of post-term pregnancies was 6.9% and the incidence of post-term pregnancies was found to be increased in obese, primiparous, and smoking women, whereas in women with chronic diseases and obstetric risks deliveries were induced earlier. The risks of macrosomia, maternal complications, and operative deliveries were increased in post-term pregnancies. Post-term infants experienced meconium passage (21.2% versus 12.8%) (p
PubMed ID
16817077 View in PubMed
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True umbilical cord knot and obstetric outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115272
Source
Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2013 Jul;122(1):18-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Sari Räisänen
Leena Georgiadis
Maija Harju
Leea Keski-Nisula
Seppo Heinonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. shraisan@student.uef.fi
Source
Int J Gynaecol Obstet. 2013 Jul;122(1):18-21
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Apgar score
Case-Control Studies
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology - etiology
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitals, University
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy outcome
Premature Birth - epidemiology - etiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Umbilical Cord - pathology
Young Adult
Abstract
To identify risk factors for true umbilical cord knot and to evaluate its association with fetal death, premature birth, low birth weight, small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infants, low Apgar score at 1 and 5 minutes, fetal venous pH of 7.15 or lower, and need for neonatal intensive care in singleton pregnancies.
The total population of women who delivered at Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland, between January 2000 and August 2012 was reviewed. Risk factors for umbilical cord knot and its association with adverse pregnancy outcome were evaluated separately among women with and without true cord knot via logistic regression analysis.
Overall, 340 (1.2%) of 27 537 singleton pregnancies were affected by umbilical cord knot, with increased incidence associated with advanced maternal age, multiparity, previous spontaneous abortion, polyhydramnios, and diabetes mellitus. Umbilical cord knot was associated with a 1.58-, 8.08-, 3.90-, 3.17-, 1.67-, and 2.00-fold increased risk of neonatal intensive care, fetal death, premature birth, SGA infants, and low Apgar score at 1 and 5 minutes, respectively.
True umbilical cord knot is relatively common and is associated with increased incidence of SGA infants, premature birth, need for neonatal intensive care, and fetal death.
PubMed ID
23523334 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.