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30 records – page 1 of 3.

Assessing regional public health preparedness: a new tool for considering cross-border issues.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155634
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2008 Sep-Oct;14(5):E15-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
Maggie Jones
Patrick O'Carroll
Jack Thompson
Luann D'Ambrosio
Author Affiliation
Center for Community Health and Evaluation, Group Health Center for Health Studies, Seattle, Washington 98101, USA. jones.margaret@ghc.org
Source
J Public Health Manag Pract. 2008 Sep-Oct;14(5):E15-22
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Communication
Disaster Planning - methods
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Internationality
Interprofessional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Needs Assessment
Northwestern United States
Public Health Practice
Regional Health Planning - methods
United States
United States Public Health Service
Abstract
To provide regional, state, and local public health officials a conceptual framework and checklist for assessing regional public health emergency preparedness, specifically in regard to cross-border public health preparedness needs.
The project had four phases that are as follows: defining the scope, conducting a literature review, soliciting expert opinion, and creating the assessment framework and checklist. A conceptual framework was developed to define the scope of the project on the basis of the kinds of resources likely to be shared across borders in a public health response (eg, data, supplies, staff), in support of the public health functions likely to be important in a health emergency (eg, epidemiology, laboratory). A literature review was then conducted to identify key articles and tools addressing regional preparedness. Key informant interviews (n = 23) were conducted with public health and emergency management professionals in the Pacific Northwest to identify a set of systems, agreements, and protocols that should be systematically considered in assessing regional public health preparedness. Using the literature review and themes from interviews, a checklist was developed.
A checklist was developed for use by public health leaders, which recommends 24 specific agreements, protocols, systems, and management structures that should be considered to foster cross-border public health preparedness.
Regional public health preparedness represents not only the sum of state-level preparedness of the states in a region but also the capacity of those states to collaborate across state and international borders during a public health emergency. This checklist provides a tool to systematically consider cross-border preparedness issues.
PubMed ID
18708880 View in PubMed
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Availability and use of medical services in an Alaskan Eskimo community

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature827
Source
Public Health Reports. 1969 Oct; 84(10):845-856
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1969
  1 website  
Author
Fortuine, R.
Author Affiliation
U.S. Indian Health Service
Source
Public Health Reports. 1969 Oct; 84(10):845-856
Date
Oct-1969
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Communications
Community health aides
Community health workers
Demography
Health services
Hooper Bay
Infant mortality
Physicians
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alaska
Child
Child, Preschool
Community Health Services - utilization
Female
Health Manpower
Hospitalization
Hospitals - utilization
Humans
Infant
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Personal Health Services - supply & distribution - utilization
Physicians - utilization
Radio
Rural Health
Sampling Studies
United States
United States Public Health Service
Abstract
This paper describes the unusual problems encountered in making medical services available to a remote Eskimo community and the pattern of utilization of these services by the people of the community. The findings may be of some assistance to other persons concerned with the health needs of a population living under similar adverse circumstances.
Notes
Alaska Medical Library - From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1474.
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1966 Jan 1;94(1):19-225322362
Cites: JAMA. 1967 Jun 12;200(11):927-314290501
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1967 Aug;82(8):714-204962121
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1968 Jul;17(1):101-65671077
Cites: Cancer. 1969 Feb;23(2):468-745764985
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1961 Jan;76:19-2413694948
Cites: Arch Otolaryngol. 1965 Jan;81:29-3314236664
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1965 Jul;80:565-7214310580
Cites: J Parasitol. 1950 Jun;36(3):232-415422459
Cites: Alaska Med. 1966 Sep;8(3):56-635341612
Online Resources
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Breast cancer screening: a 35-year perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133501
Source
Epidemiol Rev. 2011 Jul;33(1):165-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Suzanne W Fletcher
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, 133 Brookline Avenue, 6th Floor, Boston, MA 02215, USA. suzanne_fletcher@hms.harvard.edu
Source
Epidemiol Rev. 2011 Jul;33(1):165-75
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees - history
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - history
Canada
Diagnostic Errors - history
Female
Forecasting
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Mammography - history
Mass Screening - history - trends
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic - history
Risk assessment
United States
United States Public Health Service - history
Abstract
Screening for breast cancer has been evaluated by 9 randomized trials over 5 decades and recommended by major guideline groups for more than 3 decades. Successes and lessons for cancer screening from this history include development of scientific methods to evaluate screening, by the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force; the importance of randomized trials in the past, and the increasing need to develop new methods to evaluate cancer screening in the future; the challenge of assessing new technologies that are replacing originally evaluated screening tests; the need to measure false-positive screening test results and the difficulty in reducing their frequency; the unexpected emergence of overdiagnosis due to cancer screening; the difficulty in stratifying individuals according to breast cancer risk; women's fear of breast cancer and the public outrage over changing guidelines for breast cancer screening; the need for population scientists to better communicate with the public if evidence-based recommendations are to be heeded by clinicians, patients, and insurers; new developments in the primary prevention of cancers; and the interaction between improved treatment and screening, which, over time, and together with primary prevention, may decrease the need for cancer screening.
PubMed ID
21697257 View in PubMed
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The challenges of delivering health services to rural Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1454
Source
Pages 71-93 in Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Oulu, Finland, June 21-24, 1971. Acta Socio-Medica Scandinavica. Supplement 6.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1972
  1 document  
Author
Lee, J.F.
Author Affiliation
U.S. Indian Health Service
Source
Pages 71-93 in Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Oulu, Finland, June 21-24, 1971. Acta Socio-Medica Scandinavica. Supplement 6.
Date
1972
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska Native Health Service
Community health aides
Community health workers
Health status
Hospitals
Management
Self-determination
Transportation
Alaska
Arctic Regions
Biometry
Consumer Participation
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Ethnic Groups
Health Services - supply & distribution
Humans
Primary Health Care
Rural Population
United States
United States Public Health Service
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1501.
Documents
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Comments on the U.S.P.H.S. Environmental Health Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4397
Source
Alaska Med. 1969 Dec;11(4):130-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1969
Author
P. Eneboe
Source
Alaska Med. 1969 Dec;11(4):130-1
Date
Dec-1969
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Environmental health
Public Health Administration
United States
United States Public Health Service
PubMed ID
5395637 View in PubMed
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Community injury control programs of the Indian Health Service: an early assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236392
Source
Public Health Rep. 1986 Nov-Dec;101(6):632-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
L S Robertson
Source
Public Health Rep. 1986 Nov-Dec;101(6):632-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Health education
Health Services, Indigenous
Hospitalization
Humans
Indians, North American
United States
United States Public Health Service
Wounds and injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
In response to the high rates of injury morbidity and mortality among Native Americans, the Indian Health Service initiated community injury control programs in 1982 mainly aimed at educating the populations served. Substantial declines in hospitalization rates per population for falls, motor vehicle injuries, and assaults were observed through 1984. Regression analyses of changes in hospitalization rates for particular types of injury in relation to rates of persons served in 54 service units suggests some favorable effect of certain activities and possible adverse effect of a few. Increased targeting of effort based on detailed surveillance of serious injuries is planned.
Notes
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1970 Oct;85(10):881-84990244
PubMed ID
3097744 View in PubMed
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The control of organics in drinking water in Canada and the United States (standards, legislation and practice).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238023
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1985 Dec;47:45-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1985
Author
P. Toft
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1985 Dec;47:45-58
Date
Dec-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disinfection - methods - standards
Filtration - methods - standards
Humans
Legislation as Topic
Maximum Allowable Concentration
National Academy of Sciences (U.S.)
United States
United States Environmental Protection Agency
United States Public Health Service
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Pollution, Chemical - adverse effects - prevention & control
Water Supply - analysis - standards
Abstract
Both the United States and Canada have a federal form of government, but approaches used in the two countries to ensure the safety of drinking water supplies differ. The Environmental Protection Agency currently enforces regulations for 10 organic chemicals (including 6 pesticides) under the Safe Drinking Water Act and provides advice on others through its health advisory program. Canada, however, does not have similar legislation, but rather provides health-related guidelines for 21 organic chemicals (including 16 pesticides) which are used by the provincial agencies responsible for drinking water supplies. Both countries are in the process of revising their standards and will include a variety of additional synthetic organic chemicals. Where possible, standards are set using a calculated acceptable daily intake usually derived from animal feeding experiments. Procedures for setting standards for carcinogens involve a blend of risk estimation coupled with consideration of the feasibility of reducing the risk in light of socio-economic factors. Most drinking water treatment plans in North America utilize 'conventional' treatment. Some now employ modifications in order to minimize trihalomethane formation. A few use aeration or granular activated carbon to remove synthetic organic chemicals.
PubMed ID
3911419 View in PubMed
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Environmental negligence: The mercury problem

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49512
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1971 Sep;61(9):1745-1747
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1971
  1 website  
Author
Joselow, MM
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1971 Sep;61(9):1745-1747
Date
Sep-1971
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
U.S.
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental health
Environmental pollution
Food Contamination
Government Agencies
International Agencies
Japan
Mercury
Sweden
United States
United States Public Health Service
Abstract
Early in 1970, analyses of fish caught in Lake St. Clair revealed levels of mercury in excess of the Food and Drug Administration's guidelines of 0.5 ppm. Confirmation and extension of these surprising findings came quickly, and triggered a flurry of meetings, studies, reports, and government hearings that culminated in the unprecedented recommendation by the FDA that consumers no longer eat swordfish because of their consistently high mercury content.
PubMed ID
5565437 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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30 records – page 1 of 3.