Skip header and navigation

Refine By

181 records – page 1 of 19.

Access to care in the Indian Health Service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6178
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 1993;12(3):224-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
P J Cunningham
Author Affiliation
Center for General Health Services Intramural Research, Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, Rockville, MD.
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 1993;12(3):224-33
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Eligibility Determination
Employment
Female
Health Care Reform
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
United States Indian Health Service - utilization
Abstract
The Indian Health Service (IHS) is unique among U.S. private and public health programs in that free comprehensive health services are provided to eligible American Indians and Alaska Natives regardless of their ability to pay. However, resource limitations may compel some eligible persons to go outside of the IHS system to receive health care. Although IHS eligibles have comparatively low rates of private or public health care coverage, and much of this population lives in underserved areas, over half of IHS-eligible persons had some type of out-of-plan use in 1987. Furthermore, services received through private providers appear to supplement those received through IHS-sponsored providers. Overall, persons who use both IHS and non-IHS providers have higher levels of health care use than do those who rely exclusively on the IHS.
PubMed ID
8244235 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to the Indian health service care system is not associated with early enrollment in medicaid for American Indian and Alaska Natives with cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259101
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2014 Feb;23(2):362-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Andrea N Burnett-Hartman
Mark E Bensink
Kristin Berry
David G Mummy
Victoria Warren-Mears
Carol Korenbrot
Scott D Ramsey
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2014 Feb;23(2):362-4
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Medicaid - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
United States
United States Indian Health Service - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
For uninsured American Indians and Alaskan Natives (AIAN) diagnosed with cancer, prompt enrollment in Medicaid may speed access to treatment and improve survival. We hypothesized that AIANs who were eligible for the Indian Health Service Care System (IHSCS) at cancer diagnosis may be enrolled in Medicaid sooner than other AIANs.
Using Washington, Oregon, and California State Cancer Registries, we identified AIANs with a primary diagnosis of lung, breast, colorectal, cervical, ovarian, stomach, or prostate cancer between 2001 and 2007. Among AIANs enrolled in Medicaid within 365 days of a cancer diagnosis, we linked cancer registry records with Medicaid enrollment data and used a multivariate logistic regression model to compare the odds of delayed Medicaid enrollment between those with (n = 223) and without (n = 177) IHSCS eligibility.
Among AIANs who enrolled in Medicaid during the year following their cancer diagnosis, approximately 32% enrolled >1 month following diagnosis. Comparing those without IHSCS eligibility to those with IHSCS eligibility, the adjusted odds ratio (OR) for moderately late Medicaid enrollment (between 1 and 6 months after diagnosis) relative to early Medicaid enrollment (=1 month after diagnosis) was 1.10 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.62-1.95] and for very late Medicaid enrollment (>6 months to 12 months after diagnosis), OR was 1.14 (CI, 0.54-2.43).
IHSCS eligibility at the time of diagnosis does not seem to facilitate early Medicaid enrollment.
Because cancer survival rates in AIANs are among the lowest of any racial group, additional research is needed to identify factors that improve access to care in AIANs.
PubMed ID
24296857 View in PubMed
Less detail

Addressing disparities in the health of American Indian and Alaska Native people: the importance of improved public health data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104440
Source
Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:S255-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Ursula E Bauer
Marcus Plescia
Author Affiliation
Ursula E. Bauer is the director of the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, GA. Marcus Plescia is the director of the Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.
Source
Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:S255-7
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Data Collection
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Mortality - trends
Population Surveillance
Public Health
United States - epidemiology
United States Indian Health Service
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2005 Dec;95(12):2173-916257947
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Mar 10;291(10):1238-4515010446
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:S258-6224754614
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:S303-1124754554
Cites: N C Med J. 2011 May-Jun;72(3):177-8221901910
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun;104 Suppl 3:S377-8724754660
PubMed ID
24754654 View in PubMed
Less detail

Addressing the health care needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182105
Source
Am J Public Health. 2004 Jan;94(1):13-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Ruth J Katz
Source
Am J Public Health. 2004 Jan;94(1):13-4
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Public Health - education
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
United States Indian Health Service
Notes
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2004 Jan;94(1):53-914713698
Cites: JAMA. 1999 Aug 11;282(6):583-910450723
Comment On: Am J Public Health. 2004 Jan;94(1):53-914713698
PubMed ID
14713686 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aging, health, and the Indigenous people of North America.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139580
Source
J Cross Cult Gerontol. 2010 Dec;25(4):299-301
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010

The Ahalaya case-management program for HIV-infected American Indians, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians: quantitative and qualitative evaluation of impacts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2999
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2000;9(2):36-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
P D Bouey
B E Druan
Author Affiliation
The National Native American AIDS Prevention Center, 436 14th Street, Suite 1020, Oakland, CA 94612, USA. Paulbouey@nnaapc.org
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2000;9(2):36-52
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Attitude to Health
Case Management - organization & administration
Ethnic Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Hawaii - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Treatment Outcome
United States - epidemiology
United States Indian Health Service - standards
Abstract
The Ahalaya case management model was designed to provide culturally sensitive services to HIV-positive American Indians (AI), Alaska Natives (AN), and Native Hawaiians (NH). This program started in 1991 and expanded across the country in 1994. The evaluation plan included a client satisfaction survey, along with focus groups and key informant interviews. Of the 389 active clients enrolled, 132 responded to the anonymous 35-item questionnaire. Responses were favorable regarding benefits of the programs. Self-reported quality of life changes after enrollment also were significantly improved (Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test: T=6.87, p=.000; n=131). Qualitative data highlighted other important issues. Social relationships-with staff, community, and family-were critical to client welfare, as a source of both strength and fear. While AI/AN/NH case management programs have been shown effective, services need to expand, and they have to facilitate resolutions to problems in clients social relationships.
PubMed ID
11279557 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Alaska Area Native Health Service: Improving the health status of the Native people of Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6204
Source
Pages 66-69 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991, Suppl.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
  1 document  
Author
Ivey, G.H
Duyan, K.R
Source
Pages 66-69 in B.D. Postl et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 90. Proceedings of the International Congress on Circumpolar Health, 8th, Whitehorse, Yukon, May 20-25, 1990. Arctic Medical Research 1991, Suppl.
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Female
Health promotion
Health status
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Morbidity
United States
United States Indian Health Service
PubMed ID
1365257 View in PubMed
Documents
Less detail

Alcohol-related hospitalizations--Indian Health Service and tribal hospitals, United States, May 1992.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6181
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1992 Oct 16;41(41):757-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-16-1992
Source
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1992 Oct 16;41(41):757-60
Date
Oct-16-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Child
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Liver diseases, alcoholic - epidemiology
Male
United States - epidemiology
United States Indian Health Service - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Alcohol use is directly responsible for hospitalizations resulting from chronic conditions, such as alcoholic liver disease and alcoholic psychoses; in addition, alcohol use can be a contributing factor in other conditions, such as infectious diseases and injuries, that require hospital admission. Based on discharge data from Indian Health Service (IHS) facilities and CDC's National Hospital Discharge Survey (1), the proportion of alcohol-related hospitalizations (ARHs) among American Indians/Alaskan Natives has been reported as 2.5 times that for the total U.S. population. However, these estimates rely on a limited set of alcohol-defined diagnoses that are primarily associated with chronic alcoholism. To characterize more accurately the relation of alcohol use to inpatient admissions to IHS and tribally operated hospitals in the United States, IHS conducted a 1-day survey of ARHs in these facilities on Monday, May 18, 1992. This report summarizes preliminary results from the survey.
PubMed ID
1406567 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol-related mortality and tribal alcohol legislation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11104
Source
J Rural Health. 1997;13(1):38-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
M G Landen
Author Affiliation
Section of Epidemiology, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Anchorage 99524, USA.
Source
J Rural Health. 1997;13(1):38-44
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcoholism - mortality
Child
Drug and Narcotic Control - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Northwestern United States - epidemiology
Public Policy
United States - epidemiology
United States Indian Health Service
Abstract
American Indian alcohol-related mortality rates differ widely among tribes, even within the same geographic region. In addition, there are many different legislative approaches to alcohol beverage control employed by tribes. This paper explores the association between alcohol legislation and alcohol-related mortality rates among American Indian tribes located in a region of the northwestern United States from 1979 to 1990. Both an unweighted analysis of alcohol-related mortality and a weighted analysis, using the Alcohol-Related Disease Impact (ARDI) approach, are used. Alcohol-related mortality rates did not differ significantly between reservations with alcohol prohibition statutes or where alcohol was legal in this region. However, evidence suggests that more comprehensive tribal alcohol legislation may be correlated with lower alcohol-related mortality among American Indian tribes.
PubMed ID
10167764 View in PubMed
Less detail

181 records – page 1 of 19.