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40 records – page 1 of 4.

Air quality in natural areas: interface between the public, science and regulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162471
Source
Environ Pollut. 2007 Oct;149(3):256-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
K E Percy
D F Karnosky
Author Affiliation
Natural Resources Canada, Canadian Forest Service - Atlantic Forestry Centre, 1350 Regent Street, Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 5P7, Canada. kpercy@nrcan.gc.ca
Source
Environ Pollut. 2007 Oct;149(3):256-67
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Canada
Climate
Conservation of Natural Resources - legislation & jurisprudence - methods
Ecosystem
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Humans
Ozone - adverse effects - analysis
Recreation
Trees - growth & development
United States
United States Environmental Protection Agency
Abstract
Natural areas are important interfaces between air quality, the public, science and regulation. In the United States and Canada, national parks received over 315million visits during 2004. Many natural areas have been experiencing decreased visibility, increased ozone (O(3)) levels and elevated nitrogen deposition. Ozone is the most pervasive air pollutant in North American natural areas. There is an extensive scientific literature on O(3) exposure-tree response in chambered environments and, lately, free-air exposure systems. Yet, less is known about O(3) impacts on natural terrestrial ecosystems. To advance scientifically defensible O(3) risk assessment for natural forest areas, species-level measurement endpoints must be socially, economically and ecologically relevant. Exposure-based indices, based on appropriate final endpoints, present an underused opportunity to meet this need. Exposure-plant indices should have a high degree of statistical significance, have high goodness of fit, be biologically plausible and include confidence intervals to define uncertainty. They must be supported by exposure-response functions and be easy to use within an air quality regulation context. Ozone exposure-response indices developed within an ambient air context have great potential for improving risk assessment in natural forest areas and enhancing scientific literacy.
PubMed ID
17628236 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of main trends in domestic and foreign research on ecological and health aspects of environmental protection in 1990-1991]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36290
Source
Gig Sanit. 1993 May;(5):50-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1993

Animal studies in potency ranking of carcinogens in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224613
Source
Prog Clin Biol Res. 1992;374:399-414
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
T. Sanner
E. Dybing
S. Hardeng
E. Haug
S. Ovrebø
Author Affiliation
Institute for Cancer Research, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo.
Source
Prog Clin Biol Res. 1992;374:399-414
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Carcinogenicity Tests - methods
Carcinogens - toxicity
Databases, Bibliographic
Humans
Mammals
Norway
Risk factors
United States
United States Environmental Protection Agency
PubMed ID
1620715 View in PubMed
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An innovative blood lead screening program for Indian children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179708
Source
Public Health Rep. 2004 Mar-Apr;119(2):141-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
Embry M Howell
Loretta Russette
Author Affiliation
Urban Institute, Health Policy Center, 2100 M St., NW, Washington, DC 20037, USA. ehowell@ui.urban.org
Source
Public Health Rep. 2004 Mar-Apr;119(2):141-3
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Child, Preschool
Health education
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Lead - blood
Lead Poisoning - prevention & control
Mass Screening
Medicaid
Montana
United States
United States Environmental Protection Agency
Abstract
There is little information on the lead levels of Indian children nationally. In the late 1990s, members of the Chippewa and Cree tribes living on the Rocky Boy Reservation near Box Elder, Montana, were concerned about environmental pollution and how it might be affecting the health of their children. With financial assistance from the Environmental Protection Agency, the tribes designed and implemented an innovative lead screening program for young children. Because most children on the reservation participated in WIC and Head Start, those programs were used to identify and screen close to 100% of young children on the reservation. The average blood lead level for children ages 1-5 on the Rocky Boy reservation was 2.4 micrograms/dL, which is not significantly different from that of children of the same age nationally. The project showed that Indian families will participate readily in screening programs that may improve their children's health.
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2003 Apr 17;348(16):1515-612700370
PubMed ID
15192900 View in PubMed
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Assessing pesticide safety knowledge among Hispanic migrant farmworkers in Oregon.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178108
Source
J Agric Saf Health. 2004 Aug;10(3):177-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2004
Author
L A McCauley
S E Shapiro
J A Scherer
M R Lasarev
Author Affiliation
University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, 420 Guardian Drive, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6096, USA. lmccaule@nursing.upenn.edu
Source
J Agric Saf Health. 2004 Aug;10(3):177-86
Date
Aug-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hispanic Americans - psychology
Humans
Male
Mexico - ethnology
Occupational Health
Oregon
Pesticides - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Transients and Migrants
United States
United States Environmental Protection Agency
Abstract
The purpose of this article is to report on the development and initial use of a pesticide knowledge test (PKT) specifically designed to evaluate agricultural workers' knowledge of the content mandated by the federal Worker Protection Standard (WPS). The PKT is a 20-item, true-false test, used in a sample of 414 adult and adolescent migrant farmworkers in Oregon. The overall mean score, i.e., number correct, was 15.67(78.4%), with both adults and adolescents demonstrating the most difficulty with questions related to the overall health effects of pesticides. The internal consistency was 0.73, when estimated using a method to correct for small sample sizes. Only six items had less than 70% correct answers. Content validity was achieved by basing the items directly on the Worker Protection Standard; face validity was obtained by having the final version of the test reviewed by a bilingual (English-Spanish) educator familiar with the requirements of the WPS. Overall, adult participants scored better than adolescents, and those with previous pesticide training scored better than those without. There were no differences in scores based on gender or whether the test was taken in English or Spanish; however, participants who spoke indigenous languages scored significantly lower than those who did not. These results indicate that the PKT is a valid, reliable measure of worker knowledge of the content of the WPS, although it does not measure the extent to which that knowledge is actually used in the work setting.
PubMed ID
15461134 View in PubMed
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Balancing fish consumption benefits with mercury exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4863
Source
Science. 1997 Dec 12;278(5345):1904-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-12-1997
Author
G M Egeland
J P Middaugh
Author Affiliation
Section of Epidemiology, Division of Public Health, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Anchorage, AK 99524-0249, USA.
Source
Science. 1997 Dec 12;278(5345):1904-5
Date
Dec-12-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Fishes
Food
Food Contamination
Humans
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Methylmercury Compounds - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Nutrition Policy
Risk factors
Seafood
United States
United States Environmental Protection Agency
World Health Organization
Notes
Comment In: Science. 1998 Jan 23;279(5350):459, 4619454336
Comment In: Science. 1998 Jan 23;279(5350):4619454337
Comment In: Science. 1998 Jan 30;279(5351):639; author reply 6419471722
Comment In: Science. 1998 Jan 30;279(5351):640-1; author reply 6419471723
PubMed ID
9417640 View in PubMed
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Biomonitoring equivalents for 2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenylether (PBDE-99).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135539
Source
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2011 Jul;60(2):165-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Kannan Krishnan
Therese Adamou
Lesa L Aylward
Sean M Hays
Christopher R Kirman
Andy Nong
Author Affiliation
Université de Montréal, Département de santé environnementale et santé au travail, Montréal, QC, Canada.
Source
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2011 Jul;60(2):165-71
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollutants - pharmacokinetics
Guidelines as Topic
Half-Life
Halogenated Diphenyl Ethers - pharmacokinetics
Humans
Risk Assessment - methods
Tissue Distribution
United States
United States Environmental Protection Agency
Abstract
Biomonitoring Equivalents (BEs) are defined as the concentration or range of concentrations of a chemical or its metabolite in a biological medium (blood, urine, or other medium) that is consistent with an existing health-based exposure guideline such as a reference dose (RfD) or tolerable daily intake (TDI). BE values can be used as a screening tool for the evaluation of population-based biomonitoring data in the context of existing risk assessments. This study reviews health based risk assessments and exposure guidance values for 2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenylether (PBDE-99) from Health Canada and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). Toxicokinetic data from laboratory animals and humans are reviewed. A BE value corresponding to the US EPA RfD is derived here for PBDE-99 based on the assumption of chronic steady-state exposure, distribution into body lipids, and a previously-estimated first-order half-life of elimination of 1040days. The steady-state lipid-adjusted BE(RfD) is 520ng/g lipid. Sources of uncertainty relating to the underlying toxicokinetic and toxicologic database for PBDE-99 and the simultaneous exposure to multiple PBDE congeners are discussed. The BE(RfD) value may be used as a screening tool for evaluation of population biomonitoring data for PBDE-99 in the context of the existing US EPA risk assessment and can assist in prioritization of the potential need for additional risk assessment efforts for PBDE-99 relative to other chemicals.
PubMed ID
21466829 View in PubMed
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Community-based research as a mechanism to reduce environmental health disparities in american Indian and alaska native communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272066
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Apr;12(4):4076-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Cynthia Agumanu McOliver
Anne K Camper
John T Doyle
Margaret J Eggers
Tim E Ford
Mary Ann Lila
James Berner
Larry Campbell
Jamie Donatuto
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015 Apr;12(4):4076-100
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Climate change
Community-Based Participatory Research
Environmental health
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Minority Groups
Quality of Life
United States
United States Environmental Protection Agency
Abstract
Racial and ethnic minority communities, including American Indian and Alaska Natives, have been disproportionately impacted by environmental pollution and contamination. This includes siting and location of point sources of pollution, legacies of contamination of drinking and recreational water, and mining, military and agricultural impacts. As a result, both quantity and quality of culturally important subsistence resources are diminished, contributing to poor nutrition and obesity, and overall reductions in quality of life and life expectancy. Climate change is adding to these impacts on Native American communities, variably causing drought, increased flooding and forced relocation affecting tribal water resources, traditional foods, forests and forest resources, and tribal health. This article will highlight several extramural research projects supported by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Science to Achieve Results (STAR) tribal environmental research grants as a mechanism to address the environmental health inequities and disparities faced by tribal communities. The tribal research portfolio has focused on addressing tribal environmental health risks through community based participatory research. Specifically, the STAR research program was developed under the premise that tribal populations may be at an increased risk for environmentally-induced diseases as a result of unique subsistence and traditional practices of the tribes and Alaska Native villages, community activities, occupations and customs, and/or environmental releases that significantly and disproportionately impact tribal lands. Through a series of case studies, this article will demonstrate how grantees-tribal community leaders and members and academic collaborators-have been addressing these complex environmental concerns by developing capacity, expertise and tools through community-engaged research.
Notes
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2014 May 7;62(18):4007-1724219831
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 1998;19:173-2029611617
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1998 Apr;106(4):217-269494125
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2006 Dec;96(12):2122-3417077399
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2010 Apr 1;100 Suppl 1:S40-620147663
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2010 Apr 14;58(7):3884-90020025229
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2002 Apr;110 Suppl 2:259-6411929736
Cites: Ethn Health. 1997 Nov;2(4):267-759526689
Cites: Ecohealth. 2011 Jun;8(2):199-20921915737
Cites: J Psychoactive Drugs. 2011 Oct-Dec;43(4):282-9022400458
Cites: J Agric Food Chem. 2013 Nov 20;61(46):11025-3224147955
Cites: Int J Environ Health Res. 2014 Aug;24(4):341-6224044742
Cites: Fam Community Health. 2010 Jul-Sep;33(3):166-7420531097
PubMed ID
25872019 View in PubMed
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40 records – page 1 of 4.