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2780 records – page 1 of 278.

1,3-Butadiene and leukemia among synthetic rubber industry workers: exposure-response relationships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166384
Source
Chem Biol Interact. 2007 Mar 20;166(1-3):15-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2007
Author
Hong Cheng
Nalini Sathiakumar
John Graff
Robert Matthews
Elizabeth Delzell
Author Affiliation
University of Alabama at Birmingham, Ryals School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Birmingham, AL, USA. hcheng@ms.soph.uab.edu
Source
Chem Biol Interact. 2007 Mar 20;166(1-3):15-24
Date
Mar-20-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Butadienes - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinogens - chemical synthesis - chemistry - toxicity
Chemical Industry - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Confidence Intervals
Dimethyldithiocarbamate - adverse effects
Humans
Leukemia, Lymphoid - chemically induced - epidemiology
Leukemia, Myeloid - chemically induced - epidemiology
Likelihood Functions
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Proportional Hazards Models
Rubber - adverse effects - chemical synthesis - chemistry
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Previous research updated the mortality experience of North American synthetic rubber industry workers during the period 1944-1998, determined if leukemia and other cancers were associated with several employment factors and carried out Poisson regression analysis to examine exposure-response associations between estimated exposure to 1,3-butadiene (BD) or other chemicals and cancer. The present study used Cox regression procedures to examine further the exposure-response relationship between several unlagged and lagged, continuous, time-dependent BD exposure indices (BD parts per million (ppm)-years, the total number of exposures to BD concentrations >100 ppm ("peaks") and average intensity of BD) and leukemia, lymphoid neoplasms and myeloid neoplasms. All three BD exposure indices were associated positively with leukemia. Using continuous, untransformed BD ppm-years the regression coefficient (beta) from an analysis that controlled only for age was 2.9 x 10(-4) (p
PubMed ID
17123495 View in PubMed
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20 years or more of follow-up of living kidney donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222923
Source
Lancet. 1992 Oct 3;340(8823):807-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-3-1992
Author
J S Najarian
B M Chavers
L E McHugh
A J Matas
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis 55455.
Source
Lancet. 1992 Oct 3;340(8823):807-10
Date
Oct-3-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Albuminuria - urine
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Urea Nitrogen
Canada - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Creatinine - blood - urine
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - etiology
Kidney - physiology
Kidney Transplantation
Male
Middle Aged
Nephrectomy - adverse effects - mortality
Proteinuria - etiology
Pulmonary Embolism - mortality
Tissue Donors
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The perioperative and long-term risks for living kidney donors are of concern. We have studied donors at the University of Minnesota 20 years or more (mean 23.7) after donation by comparing renal function, blood pressure, and proteinuria in donors with siblings. In 57 donors (mean age 61 [SE 1]), mean serum creatinine is 1.1 (0.01) mg/dl, blood urea nitrogen 17 (0.5) mg/dl, creatinine clearance 82 (2) ml/min, and blood pressure 134 (2)/80 (1) mm Hg. 32% of the donors are taking antihypertensive drugs and 23% have proteinuria. The 65 siblings (mean age 58 [1.3]) do not significantly differ from the donors in any of these variables: 1.1 (0.03) mg/dl, 17 (1.2) mg/dl, 89 (3.3) ml/min, and 130 (3)/80 (1.5) mm Hg, respectively. 44% of the siblings are taking antihypertensives and 22% have proteinuria. To assess perioperative mortality, we surveyed all members of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons about donor mortality at their institutions. We documented 17 perioperative deaths in the USA and Canada after living donation, and estimate mortality to be 0.03%. We conclude that perioperative mortality in the USA and Canada after living-donor nephrectomy is low. In long-term follow-up of our living donors, we found no evidence of progressive renal deterioration or other serious disorders.
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1992 Nov 28;340(8831):1354-51360068
PubMed ID
1357243 View in PubMed
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50bp deletion in the promoter for superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) reduces SOD1 expression in vitro and may correlate with increased age of onset of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156293
Source
Amyotroph Lateral Scler. 2008 Aug;9(4):229-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Wendy J Broom
Matthew Greenway
Ghazaleh Sadri-Vakili
Carsten Russ
Kristen E Auwarter
Kelly E Glajch
Nicolas Dupre
Robert J Swingler
Shaun Purcell
Caroline Hayward
Peter C Sapp
Diane McKenna-Yasek
Paul N Valdmanis
Jean-Pierre Bouchard
Vincent Meininger
Betsy A Hosler
Jonathan D Glass
Meraida Polack
Guy A Rouleau
Jang-Ho J Cha
Orla Hardiman
Robert H Brown
Author Affiliation
Day Neuromuscular Research Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA. wendy.broom@gmail.com
Source
Amyotroph Lateral Scler. 2008 Aug;9(4):229-37
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - enzymology - epidemiology - genetics
Base Sequence
DNA Mutational Analysis
Female
Gene Expression
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Homozygote
Humans
Ireland - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Genetic
Promoter Regions, Genetic
Quebec - epidemiology
Risk factors
Scotland - epidemiology
Sequence Deletion
Sp1 Transcription Factor - metabolism
Superoxide Dismutase - genetics - metabolism
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective was to test the hypothesis that a described association between homozygosity for a 50bp deletion in the SOD1 promoter 1684bp upstream of the SOD1 ATG and an increased age of onset in SALS can be replicated in additional SALS and control sample sets from other populations. Our second objective was to examine whether this deletion attenuates expression of the SOD1 gene. Genomic DNA from more than 1200 SALS cases from Ireland, Scotland, Quebec and the USA was genotyped for the 50bp SOD1 promoter deletion. Reporter gene expression analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies were utilized to examine the functional effects of the deletion. The genetic association for homozygosity for the promoter deletion with an increased age of symptom onset was confirmed overall in this further study (p=0.032), although it was only statistically significant in the Irish subset, and remained highly significant in the combined set of all cohorts (p=0.001). Functional studies demonstrated that this polymorphism reduces the activity of the SOD1 promoter by approximately 50%. In addition we revealed that the transcription factor SP1 binds within the 50bp deletion region in vitro and in vivo. Our findings suggest the hypothesis that this deletion reduces expression of the SOD1 gene and that levels of the SOD1 protein may modify the phenotype of SALS within selected populations.
PubMed ID
18608091 View in PubMed
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450K epigenome-wide scan identifies differential DNA methylation in newborns related to maternal smoking during pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122072
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Oct;120(10):1425-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Bonnie R Joubert
Siri E Håberg
Roy M Nilsen
Xuting Wang
Stein E Vollset
Susan K Murphy
Zhiqing Huang
Cathrine Hoyo
Øivind Midttun
Lea A Cupul-Uicab
Per M Ueland
Michael C Wu
Wenche Nystad
Douglas A Bell
Shyamal D Peddada
Stephanie J London
Author Affiliation
Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709, USA.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Oct;120(10):1425-31
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors - genetics - metabolism
Biological Markers - blood
Chromatography, Liquid
Cohort Studies
Cotinine - blood
Cytochrome P-450 CYP1A1 - genetics - metabolism
DNA Methylation
DNA-Binding Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Epigenesis, Genetic
Female
Fetal Blood
Genome-Wide Association Study
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Exposure
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced - epidemiology - genetics
Repressor Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Transcription Factors - genetics - metabolism
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation, due to in utero exposures may play a critical role in early programming for childhood and adult illness. Maternal smoking is a major risk factor for multiple adverse health outcomes in children, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear.
We investigated epigenome-wide methylation in cord blood of newborns in relation to maternal smoking during pregnancy.
We examined maternal plasma cotinine (an objective biomarker of smoking) measured during pregnancy in relation to DNA methylation at 473,844 CpG sites (CpGs) in 1,062 newborn cord blood samples from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip (450K).
We found differential DNA methylation at epigenome-wide statistical significance (p-value
Notes
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Erratum In: Environ Health Perspect. 2012 Dec;120(12):A455
PubMed ID
22851337 View in PubMed
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1951 influenza epidemic, England and Wales, Canada, and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169257
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2006 Apr;12(4):661-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Cécile Viboud
Theresa Tam
Douglas Fleming
Mark A Miller
Lone Simonsen
Author Affiliation
National Institutes of Health, Fogarty International Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. viboudc@mail.nih.gov
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2006 Apr;12(4):661-8
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - history
England - epidemiology
History, 20th Century
Humans
Infant
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - history
Middle Aged
Seasons
United States - epidemiology
Wales - epidemiology
Abstract
Influenza poses a continuing public health threat in epidemic and pandemic seasons. The 1951 influenza epidemic (A/H1N1) caused an unusually high death toll in England; in particular, weekly deaths in Liverpool even surpassed those of the 1918 pandemic. We further quantified the death rate of the 1951 epidemic in 3 countries. In England and Canada, we found that excess death rates from pneumonia and influenza and all causes were substantially higher for the 1951 epidemic than for the 1957 and 1968 pandemics (by > or =50%). The age-specific pattern of deaths in 1951 was consistent with that of other interpandemic seasons; no age shift to younger age groups, reminiscent of pandemics, occurred in the death rate. In contrast to England and Canada, the 1951 epidemic was not particularly severe in the United States. Why this epidemic was so severe in some areas but not others remains unknown and highlights major gaps in our understanding of interpandemic influenza.
Notes
Cites: Vaccine. 1999 Jul 30;17 Suppl 1:S3-1010471173
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PubMed ID
16704816 View in PubMed
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The 1994 annual report of the North American Pediatric Renal Transplant Cooperative Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211369
Source
Pediatr Nephrol. 1996 Aug;10(4):422-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
E C Kohaut
A. Tejani
Author Affiliation
University of Alabama, Birmingham, USA.
Source
Pediatr Nephrol. 1996 Aug;10(4):422-34
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Annual Reports as Topic
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Graft Rejection - prevention & control
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - therapeutic use
Infant
Kidney Failure, Chronic - mortality - surgery
Kidney Transplantation - utilization
Male
Renal Dialysis
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The North American Pediatric Renal Transplant Cooperative Study (NAPRTCS) is a research effort that was organized and initiated in 1987. The following manuscript is the 1994 NAPRTCS annual report which has summarized data that has been voluntarily contributed by 83 centers. The report includes data on 3,183 patients who have undergone a total of 3,445 renal transplants between 1 January 1987 and 18 February 1994 when the data set was closed. The report also contains data on 1,611 independent courses of dialysis which were initiated between 1 January 1992 and 18 February 1994. This report is meant to update the previous NAPRTCS annual reports as well as demonstrate how the NAPRTCS database has changed clinical practice since its inception. There have been 855 graft failures among the 3,438 transplants. Due to the maturing of the database, chronic rejection now accounts for 34% of graft failures which have occurred over the last year. Graft failure was increased in recipients if the recipients were 6 years did not have catch-up growth post transplant. Overall graft survival has improved markedly since the inception of this study. The dialysis database is just maturing and the data confirm that growth on dialysis continues to be very poor. The 1994 annual report of NAPRTCS extends previous findings of this valuable database. It is gratifying to know that early findings of NAPRTCS have led to changes in therapy which have led to improvement in the care of these very special children.
PubMed ID
8865236 View in PubMed
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2012 Pediatric Report: devastating at any age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116028
Source
Bull Am Coll Surg. 2013 Feb;98(2):59-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Richard J Fantus
Michael L Nance
Author Affiliation
Trauma Services, Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center, Chicago, USA.
Source
Bull Am Coll Surg. 2013 Feb;98(2):59-60
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
General Surgery
Humans
Infant
Pediatrics
Registries
Research Report
Societies, Medical
United States - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - mortality
Young Adult
PubMed ID
23441511 View in PubMed
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Source
J Healthc Prot Manage. 2014;30(2):28-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014

Abortion surveillance--United States, 1998

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4488
Source
MMWR Surveill Summ. 2002 Jun 7;51(3):1-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-7-2002
Author
Herndon, J
Strauss, LT
Whitehead, S
Parker, WY
Bartlett, L
Zane, S
Author Affiliation
Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, USA
Source
MMWR Surveill Summ. 2002 Jun 7;51(3):1-32
Date
Jun-7-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Humans
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
PROBLEM/CONDITION: In 1969, CDC began abortion surveillance to document the number and characteristics of women obtaining legal induced abortions, to monitor unintended pregnancy, and to assist efforts to identify and reduce preventable causes of morbidity and mortality associated with abortions. REPORTING PERIOD COVERED: This report summarizes and reviews information reported to CDC regarding legal induced abortions obtained in the United States in 1998. DESCRIPTION OF SYSTEM: For each year since 1969, CDC has compiled abortion data by occurrence. From 1973 to 1997, data were received from or estimated for 52 reporting areas in the United States: 50 states, the District of Columbia, and New York City. In 1998, CDC compiled abortion data from only 48 reporting areas; Alaska, California, New Hampshire, and Oklahoma did not report. RESULTS: In 1998, 884,273 legal induced abortions were reported to CDC, representing a 2% decrease from the 900,171 legal induced abortions reported by the same 48 reporting areas for 1997. The abortion ratio, defined as the number of abortions per 1,000 live births, was 264, compared with 274 in 1997 (for the same 48 areas); the abortion rate for these 48 areas was 17 per 1,000 women aged 15-44 years for both 1997 and 1998. The availability of information about characteristics of women who obtained an abortion in 1998 varied by state and by the number of states reporting each characteristic. The total number of legal induced abortions by state is reported by state of residence and state of occurrence; characteristics of women obtaining abortions in 1998 are reported by state of occurrence. Women undergoing an abortion were likely to be young (i.e., age or = 21 weeks. A total of 24 reporting areas submitted information stating that they performed medical (nonsurgical) procedures (two of these areas categorized medical abortions with "other" procedures), making up
PubMed ID
12369584 View in PubMed
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2780 records – page 1 of 278.