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A 26-year follow-up study of heavy drinking trajectories from adolescence to mid-adulthood and adult disadvantage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115198
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2013 Jul-Aug;48(4):452-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Noora Berg
Olli Kiviruusu
Sakari Karvonen
Laura Kestilä
Tomi Lintonen
Ossi Rahkonen
Taina Huurre
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, P.O. Box 30, FI-00271 Helsinki, Finland. noora.berg@thl.fi
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2013 Jul-Aug;48(4):452-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Male
Sex Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Unemployment
Abstract
The aim of the study was to identify heavy drinking trajectories from age 16 to 42 years and to examine their associations with health, social, employment and economic disadvantage in mid-adulthood.
Finnish cohort study's participants who were 16 years old in 1983 were followed up at age 22, 32 and 42 (n = 1334). Heavy drinking was assessed at every study phase and based on these measurements trajectories of heavy drinking were identified. The trajectory groups were then examined as predictors of disadvantage at age 42.
Five distinct heavy drinking trajectories were identified: moderate (35%), steady low (22%), decreasing (9%), increasing (11%) and steady high (23%). Frequencies of the trajectory groups differed by gender. Using the moderate trajectory as a reference category, women in the steady high trajectory had an increased risk of experiencing almost all disadvantages at age 42. In men, increasing and steady high groups had an increased risk for experiencing health and economic disadvantage.
Steady high female drinkers and steady high and increasing male drinkers had the highest risk for disadvantage in mid-adulthood. By identifying heavy drinking trajectories from adolescence to mid-adulthood we can better predict long-term consequences of heavy alcohol use and plan prevention and intervention programmes.
PubMed ID
23531717 View in PubMed
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Able or unable to work? Life trajectory after severe occupational injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310745
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2019 09; 41(18):2192-2198
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
09-2019
Author
Jarna Kulmala
Arto Luoma
Lasse Koskinen
Author Affiliation
a Faculty of Management , University of Tampere , Tampere , Finland.
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2019 09; 41(18):2192-2198
Date
09-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Income
Injury Severity Score
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Injuries - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Registries
Retirement - statistics & numerical data
Return to Work - statistics & numerical data
Unemployment - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Purpose: To study the probabilities and permanence of return to work, inability to work and rehabilitation, and to explore the connection between these life situations and later working after a severe occupational injury. Materials and methods: A historical cohort of Finnish workers with a severe occupational injury during 2008 (N?=?11,585) were followed up annually on the outcomes of return to work over a 5-year observation period. We examined transition probabilities from one life situation to another with Markov chain analysis, and applied logistic regression with generalized estimating equations to assess the effect of register-based determinants on return to work. Results: Within the five anniversaries, 85% of the injured were working, 9% were unable to work (fully or partly) and 2% received rehabilitation. Age, gross annual income, type of work, injured body part, injury type and the injured's annual condition subsequent to the work injury were significant determinants of return to work. Conclusions: The probability of return to work decreased with time, but, on average, one-fifth of the injured workers succeeded in return to work after being unable to work on the previous anniversary, which indicates that it is worthwhile to conduct efforts for this target group in order to promote return to work. Implications for Rehabilitation The current life situation of the injured should be taken into account when promoting return to work, as it is a strong predictor of later working after a serious occupational injury. Rehabilitation and return to work programs should start in time due to declining return to work rates as the disability continues. Return to work on a part-time basis could be a good option during the early phases of recovery, since a notable proportion of those partly unable to work on the first anniversary returned later to full-time workers. The probability of recovery is relatively high even for those with long-term disabilities, so the promotion of return to work is highly recommended also for this target group.
PubMed ID
29688084 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal youth in Canada: a profile based upon 1981 census data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39493
Source
Can Stat Rev. 1985 Sep;60(9):vi-
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1985
Author
G E Priest
Source
Can Stat Rev. 1985 Sep;60(9):vi-
Date
Sep-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Americas
Canada
Censuses
Comparative Study
Culture
Demography
Developed Countries
Developing Countries
Educational Status
Emigration and Immigration
Employment
Ethnic Groups
Family Characteristics
Income
Indians, North American
Industry
North America
Occupations
Population
Population Characteristics
Research
Unemployment
Abstract
An analysis of the data from the 1981 census of Canada is presented concerning the aboriginal population aged 15 to 24, defined as including the Inuit, status Indian, non-status Indian, and Metis populations. Comparisons are made with the non-aboriginal population. Factors considered include geographic location, migration, family status, dependent children, educational status, labor force participation, unemployment, income, and industry.
PubMed ID
12340640 View in PubMed
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Accumulated exposure to unemployment is related to impaired glucose metabolism in middle-aged men: A follow-up of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291192
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2017 Aug; 11(4):365-372
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Nina Rautio
Tuulia Varanka-Ruuska
Eeva Vaaramo
Saranya Palaniswamy
Rozenn Nedelec
Jouko Miettunen
Jaro Karppinen
Juha Auvinen
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi
Sylvain Sebert
Leena Ala-Mursula
Author Affiliation
Center for Life Course Health Research, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, 90014 Oulu, Finland; Unit of Primary Health Care, Oulu University Hospital, OYS, P.O. Box 20, 90029 Oulu, Finland. Electronic address: nina.rautio@oulu.fi.
Source
Prim Care Diabetes. 2017 Aug; 11(4):365-372
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Biomarkers - blood
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Chi-Square Distribution
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Prediabetic State - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Unemployment
Abstract
We explored whether registered unemployment is associated with impaired glucose metabolism in general population.
Based on Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 at 46 years, we analyzed the oral glucose tolerance tests of 1970 men and 2544 women in relation to their preceding three-year employment records in three categories of unemployment exposure: no (employed), low (=1-year) and high exposure (>1-year).
Among men, pre-diabetes was found in 19.2% of those with no unemployment, 23.0% with low and 27.0% with high exposure, the corresponding figures for screen-detected type 2 diabetes were 3.8%, 3.8% and 9.2% (p
Notes
CommentIn: Prim Care Diabetes. 2018 Feb;12 (1):92 PMID 28807657
PubMed ID
28456438 View in PubMed
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Accumulated unhealthy behaviors and psychosocial problems in adolescence are associated with labor market exclusion in early adulthood - a northern Finland birth cohort 1986 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305696
Source
BMC Public Health. 2020 Jun 05; 20(1):869
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-05-2020
Author
Eveliina Heikkala
Leena Ala-Mursula
Simo Taimela
Markus Paananen
Eeva Vaaramo
Juha Auvinen
Jaro Karppinen
Author Affiliation
Medical Research Center Oulu, University of Oulu and Oulu University Hospital, PO Box 5000, 90014, Oulu, Finland. mia.heikkala@oulu.fi.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2020 Jun 05; 20(1):869
Date
Jun-05-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cluster analysis
Cohort Studies
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Healthy Lifestyle
Humans
Latent Class Analysis
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Pain - epidemiology - psychology
Occupations
Registries
Sedentary Behavior
Social Class
Surveys and Questionnaires
Unemployment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Work - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The relevance of health-related behaviors to exclusion from the labor market in early adulthood remains poorly studied in relation to the magnitude of the problem. We explored whether adolescents' accumulated unhealthy behaviors and psychosocial problems are associated with later labor market exclusion, and whether multisite musculoskeletal pain (MMSP) impacts these relations.
We gathered questionnaire data on unhealthy behaviors and psychosocial problems and MMSP among adolescents aged 15 to 16 belonging to the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986. The findings were combined with registry data on unemployment, employment and permanent work disability during a five-year follow-up between the ages of 25 and 29 (n?=?6692). In the statistical modeling we used education, family leave and socioeconomic status of childhood family as potential confounders, as well as latent class and logistic regression analyses.
The Externalizing behavior cluster associated with over one year of unemployment (RR 1.64, CI 1.25-2.14) and permanent work disability (OR 2.49, CI 1.07-5.78) in the follow-up among the men. The Sedentary cluster also associated with over one year (RR 1.41, CI 1.13-1.75) and under one year of unemployment (RR 1.25, CI 1.02-1.52) and no employment days (RR 1.93, CI 1.26-2.95) among the men. Obese male participants were at risk of over one year of unemployment (RR 1.50, CI 1.08-2.09) and no employment days (RR 1.93, CI 1.07-3.50). Among the women, the Multiple risk behavior cluster related significantly to over one year of unemployment (RR 1.77, CI 1.37-2.28). MMSP had no influence on the associations.
Unhealthy behavior patterns and psychosocial problems in adolescence have long-term consequences for exclusion from the labor market in early adulthood, especially among men. Simultaneously supporting psychological well-being and healthy behaviors in adolescence may reduce labor market inclusion difficulties in the early phase of working life.
PubMed ID
32503491 View in PubMed
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Activity during unemployment and mental health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52737
Source
Scand J Psychol. 1996 Sep;37(3):269-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1996
Author
K. Underlid
Author Affiliation
Bergen College of Advanced Education, Norway.
Source
Scand J Psychol. 1996 Sep;37(3):269-81
Date
Sep-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Norway
Social Behavior
Social Environment
Unemployment - psychology
Abstract
The main purpose of this study was to investigate activity during unemployment and the relationship between such activity and mental health in a sample (n = 213) of unemployed Norwegians. The results indicate that the unemployed are generally more passive than the average population, and that they are considerably less involved in social activities. However, the unemployed do not constitute a homogeneous group in terms of activity level and activity profile. Women were somewhat more active that men, particularly in connection with domestic chores. Young people were more active than the other age groups, particularly in connection with extra-familial activities. Several significant relationships were found between different activity categories and mental health. The more active the unemployed were, the better their mental health. The results are discussed in relation to similar data for the average population, other unemployment research, subjective and objective factors which can be of importance to the activity level and profile of the unemployed, sex role issues, theoretical models developed to explain and understand the effects of unemployment, methodological considerations, and the possible functions of activity for mental health.
PubMed ID
8856999 View in PubMed
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Adolescent depression and subsequent earnings across early to middle adulthood: a 25-year longitudinal cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306083
Source
Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci. 2020 Apr 29; 29:e123
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-29-2020
Author
Anna Philipson
Iman Alaie
Richard Ssegonja
Henrik Imberg
William Copeland
Margareta Möller
Lars Hagberg
Ulf Jonsson
Author Affiliation
University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
Source
Epidemiol Psychiatr Sci. 2020 Apr 29; 29:e123
Date
Apr-29-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Poverty - psychology
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Unemployment - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The few available studies on early-onset depression and future earnings offer ambiguous findings, and potential sources of heterogeneity are poorly understood. We examined the differences in adult earnings of males and females with and without a history of depressive disorder in adolescence, with specific focuses on (1) future earnings in clinical subtypes of adolescent depression; (2) the growth and distribution of earnings over time within these subgroups and (3) the mediating role of subsequent depressive episodes occurring in early adulthood.
Data were drawn from the Uppsala Longitudinal Adolescent Depression Study, a community-based cohort study initiated in Uppsala, Sweden, in the early 1990s. Comprehensive diagnostic assessments were conducted at age 16-17 and in follow-up interviews 15 years later, while consecutive data on earnings for the years 1996 to 2016 (ages 20-40) were drawn from population-based registries. The current study included participants with a history of persistent depressive disorder (PDD) (n = 175), episodic major depressive disorder (MDD) (n = 82), subthreshold depression (n = 64) or no depression (n = 218) in adolescence. The association of adolescent depression with earnings in adulthood was analysed using generalised estimating equations. Estimates were adjusted for major child and adolescent psychiatric comorbidities and parental socioeconomic status. The indirect (mediated) effect of depression in early adulthood (ages 19-30) on earnings in mid-adulthood (31-40) was estimated in mediation analysis. The study followed the 'STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational studies in Epidemiology' (STROBE) guidelines.
Earnings across early to middle adulthood were lower for participants with a history of a PDD in adolescence than for their non-depressed peers, with an adjusted ratio of mean earnings of 0.85 (0.77-0.95) for females and 0.76 (0.60-0.95) for males. The differences were consistent over time, and more pronounced in the lower percentiles of the earnings distributions. The association was partially mediated by recurrent depression in early adulthood (48% in total; 61% for females, 29% for males). No reduction in earnings was observed among participants with episodic MDD in adolescence, while results for subthreshold depression were inconclusive.
Our findings suggest that future earnings of adolescents with depressive disorders are contingent on the duration and natural long-term course of early-onset depression, emphasising the need for timely and effective interventions to avoid loss of human capital.
PubMed ID
32345393 View in PubMed
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Adolescent homicides in Finland: offence and offender characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171077
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2006 Dec 20;164(2-3):110-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-20-2006
Author
Camilla Hagelstam
Helinä Häkkänen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Criminal and Forensic Psychology Research Group, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Forensic Sci Int. 2006 Dec 20;164(2-3):110-5
Date
Dec-20-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Aged
Child
Conduct Disorder - epidemiology
Crime Victims - statistics & numerical data
Developmental Disabilities - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Forensic Psychiatry
Homicide - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Intelligence
Male
Methods
Middle Aged
Motivation
Personality Disorders - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Self-Injurious Behavior - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Unemployment - statistics & numerical data
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Approximately 9% of the homicides in Finland are committed by adolescents under 20 years of age. The purpose of this study was to investigate the offence and offender characteristics in homicidal adolescents. Forensic psychiatric evaluation statements of adolescent offenders accused of a homicide during 1990-2001 were reviewed retrospectively (n=57). In 38% of the cases, there were multiple offenders. In 58% of the cases, the victim was an acquaintance, in 25% a stranger, in 12% a family member and in 5% of the cases an (ex)intimate partner. Sixty-nine percent of the offenders were intoxicated and 21% under the influence of drugs at the time of the killing. The most frequent motives were an argument (25%) and a robbery (25%). Sixty-four percent of the offenders had developmental problems and 42% had a crime history. Approximately half were diagnosed as having a conduct or a personality disorder, but 32% of the offenders were considered not to suffer from a mental illness or substance abuse. For 63%, the level of intellectual functioning was average or above average. There were signs of more than one form of violence in 54% of the cases and 28% of the cases contained excessive violence. The use of multiple and excessive violence was significantly related to the offender age, multiple offenders, offender-victim relationship and substance abuse, but not related to having developmental problems, crime history or mental illness.
PubMed ID
16426787 View in PubMed
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Adolescents alcohol-use and economic conditions: a multilevel analysis of data from a period with big economic changes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146664
Source
Eur J Health Econ. 2010 Dec;11(6):533-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Mikael Svensson
Curt Hagquist
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, Swedish Business School, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden. mikael.svensson@oru.se
Source
Eur J Health Econ. 2010 Dec;11(6):533-41
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - economics - epidemiology
Alcoholism - economics - epidemiology
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - economics
Sweden
Time Factors
Unemployment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
This paper examines how the unemployment rate is related to adolescent alcohol use and experience of binge drinking during a time period characterized by big societal changes. The paper uses repeated cross-sectional adolescent survey data from a Swedish region, collected in 1988, 1991, 1995, 1998, 2002 and 2005, and merges this with data on local unemployment rates for the same time periods. Individual level frequency of alcohol use as well as experience of binge drinking is connected to local level unemployment rate to estimate the relationship using multilevel modeling. The model includes municipality effects controlling for time-invariant differences between municipalities as well as year fixed effects controlling for municipality-invariant changes over time in alcohol use. The results show that the unemployment rate is negatively associated with adolescents' alcohol use and the experience of binge drinking. When the unemployment rate increases, more adolescents do not drink at all. Regular drinking (twice per month or more) is, on the other hand, unrelated to the unemployment rate. Examining gender-differences in the relationship, it is shown that the results are driven by behavior in girls, whereas drinking among boys does not show any significant relationship with changes in the unemployment rate.
PubMed ID
20012126 View in PubMed
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Adverse outcomes of chronic widespread pain and common mental disorders in individuals with sickness absence - a prospective study of Swedish twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304944
Source
BMC Public Health. 2020 Aug 27; 20(1):1301
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Date
Aug-27-2020
Author
Mo Wang
Annina Ropponen
Jurgita Narusyte
Björg Helgadóttir
Gunnar Bergström
Victoria Blom
Pia Svedberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77, Stockholm, Sweden. mo.wang@ki.se.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2020 Aug 27; 20(1):1301
Date
Aug-27-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Keywords
Adult
Chronic Pain - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Mortality
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Twins
Unemployment - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Chronic widespread pain (CWP) and common mental disorders (CMDs) are common public health problems, but little is known about the role of CWP and CMDs on future adverse outcomes among work disabled individuals. The aims of the study were to investigate the associations between CWP and CMDs with subsequent disability pension (DP), long-term unemployment (>?90?days) and all-cause mortality in individuals with sickness absence (SA) and whether the associations were explained by familial factors.
In this prospective cohort study, 7884 Swedish twins born between 1933 and 1985 were included and baseline data were gathered from a questionnaire in 1998 to 2006. Register data were used for obtaining information regarding demographics, SA, DP, unemployment and mortality. Cox proportional hazards regressions were used to calculate Hazard Ratios (HR) with 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) for the associations between CWP and/or CMDs with DP, unemployment and mortality, while conditional Cox models for twin pairs provided control for familial confounding.
Having either CWP or CMDs among those with a history of SA was associated with a higher risk of DP and all-cause mortality than individuals without CWP and CMDs after controlling for socio-demographic and health factors. Moreover, sick-listed individuals with both CWP and CMDs had a higher risk of DP while those who only had CMDs had a higher risk of long-term unemployment compared to those without CWP and CMDs. The association between CMDs with DP and long-term unemployment was no longer significant when controlling for familial factors.
CMDs was a risk factor for DP, unemployment and mortality among individuals with SA, while CWP seems to be important in relation to future DP and mortality. Familial factors played a role in the associations between CMDs and DP and CMDs and unemployment.
PubMed ID
32854684 View in PubMed
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690 records – page 1 of 69.