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253 records – page 1 of 26.

Acrylamide: lessons for risk management and communication.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183415
Source
J Health Commun. 2003 Sep-Oct;8(5):435-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ortwin Renn
Author Affiliation
University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart, Germany. ortwin-renn@ta-akademie.de
Source
J Health Commun. 2003 Sep-Oct;8(5):435-41
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - toxicity
Communication
Food analysis
Humans
Mass Media
Policy Making
Public Health Administration
Risk assessment
Risk Management
Sweden
Uncertainty
Notes
Comment On: J Health Commun. 2003 Sep-Oct;8(5):407-3214530144
PubMed ID
14530146 View in PubMed
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Adoption of diagnostic technology and variation in caesarean section rates: a test of the practice style hypothesis in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124304
Source
Health Serv Res. 2012 Dec;47(6):2169-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Jostein Grytten
Lars Monkerud
Rune Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Section of Community Dentistry, University of Oslo and Akershus University Hospital, Blindern, Oslo, Norway. josteing@odont.uio.no
Source
Health Serv Res. 2012 Dec;47(6):2169-89
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiotocography
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data - trends
Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures - statistics & numerical data
Electrocardiography
Female
Fetal Blood - chemistry
Humans
Norway
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data - trends
Pregnancy
Ultrasonography
Uncertainty
Abstract
To examine whether the introduction of advanced diagnostic technology in maternity care has led to less variation in type of delivery between hospitals in Norway.
The Medical Birth Registry of Norway provided detailed medical information for 1.7 million deliveries from 1967 to 2005. Information about diagnostic technology was collected directly from the maternity units.
The data were analyzed using a two-level binary logistic model with Caesarean section as the outcome measure. Level one contained variables that characterized the health status of the mother and child. Hospitals are level two. A heterogeneous variance structure was specified for the hospital level, where the error variance was allowed to vary according to the following types of diagnostic technology: two-dimensional ultrasound, cardiotocography, ST waveform analysis, and fetal blood analyses.
There was a marked variation in Caesarean section rates between hospitals up to 1973. After this the variation diminished markedly. This was due to the introduction of ultrasound and cardiotocography.
Diagnostic technology reduced clinical uncertainty about the diagnosis of risk factors of the mother and child during delivery, and variation in type of delivery between hospitals was reduced accordingly. The results support the practice style hypothesis.
PubMed ID
22594486 View in PubMed
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Affective and cognitive attitudes, uncertainty avoidance and intention to obtain genetic testing: an extension of the Theory of Planned Behaviour.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136743
Source
Psychol Health. 2011 Sep;26(9):1143-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Katharina Wolff
Karin Nordin
Wibecke Brun
Gunilla Berglund
Gerd Kvale
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychosocial Science, University of Bergen, Christiesgate 12, Bergen, Norway. katharina.wolff@psysp.uib.no
Source
Psychol Health. 2011 Sep;26(9):1143-55
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect
Attitude to Health
Awareness
Culture
Defense Mechanisms
Female
Genetic Diseases, Inborn - genetics - mortality - psychology
Genetic Testing
Humans
Intention
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Norway
Penetrance
Psychological Theory
Questionnaires
Survival
Uncertainty
Abstract
To ensure successful implementation of genetic screening and counselling according to patients best interests, the attitudes and motives of the public are important to consider. The aim of this study was to apply a theoretical framework in order to investigate which individual and disease characteristics might facilitate the uptake of genetic testing. A questionnaire using an extended version of the Theory of Planned Behaviour was developed to assess the predictive value of affective and cognitive expected outcomes, subjective norms, perceived control and uncertainty avoidance on the intention to undergo genetic testing. In addition to these individual characteristics, the predictive power of two disease characteristics was investigated by systematically varying the diseases fatality and penetrance (i.e. the probability of getting ill in case one is a mutation carrier). This resulted in four versions of the questionnaire which was mailed to a random sample of 2400 Norwegians. Results showed genetic test interest to be quite high, and to vary depending on the characteristics of the disease, with participants preferring tests for highly penetrant diseases. The most important individual predictor was uncertainty avoidance.
PubMed ID
21347976 View in PubMed
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AIDS and risk: the handling of uncertainty in northern Tanzania.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81339
Source
Cult Health Sex. 2005 Jan;7(1):1-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Haram Liv
Author Affiliation
Nordic Africa Institute, Uppsala, Sweden. Liv.Haram@nai.uu.se
Source
Cult Health Sex. 2005 Jan;7(1):1-11
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cultural Characteristics
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Female
HIV Infections - epidemiology
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Poverty
Risk factors
Sexual Behavior - statistics & numerical data
Social Environment
Tanzania - epidemiology
Uncertainty
Women's health
Abstract
Studies of sexual risk behaviour in the context of HIV/AIDS often utilize theories of risk which are predicated on the idea of the rational actor making choices, and thus operate with a strong notion of the autonomous individual. The underlying assumption is that a well-informed individual would strive to reduce risk and therefore choose not to engage in risky behaviour in sexual encounters. Drawing on longitudinal fieldwork in Arusha town and the surrounding districts in northern Tanzania, this paper explores how people draw on a complexity of knowledge and experience when they try to reduce the likelihood of contracting HIV. It shows how the embeddedness of social relationships, and the constraints of culture restrict the possible range of options, particularly for women. The paper examines the paired concepts of risk and trust, arguing that trust in a sexual relationship is gendered in particular ways. Gender hierarchies often place women in a subordinate position to men as a result of which women have to make compromises which put their health at risk.
PubMed ID
16864184 View in PubMed
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Alternative approaches to dealing with respondent uncertainty in contingent valuation: a comparative analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129888
Source
J Environ Manage. 2012 Jan;93(1):130-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Roberto Martínez-Espiñeira
Nikita Lyssenko
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John's A1C 5S7, NL, Canada. rmartinezesp@mun.ca
Source
J Environ Manage. 2012 Jan;93(1):130-9
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bias (epidemiology)
Conservation of Natural Resources - economics
Data Collection
Financial Support
Humans
Likelihood Functions
Logistic Models
Models, Economic
Newfoundland and Labrador
Public Opinion
Questionnaires
Uncertainty
Whales
Abstract
Several strategies have been proposed to deal with response uncertainty in contingent valuation. One approach, often applied to address issues of hypothetical bias, recodes and/or reweights responses according to stated levels of certainty but so far few analyses compare alternative recoding and reweighting strategies. We explore the choice among alternative strategies that exploit a numerical certainty scale obtained from a follow-up to the payment question in a valuation survey about a whale conservation program. Two novel variations of previously followed approaches perform best on our dataset in terms of the efficiency of estimates. The first one uses an exponential transformation of the numerical certainty scale as a weight in the willingness to pay regression. The other one is based on constructing a continuous willingness to pay variable with the highly certain "yes" and "no" original responses to the payment question as extreme values and with mid-point values that correspond to the original "don't know" responses. We find, though, that the effect of using different treatment strategies on mean willingness to pay is rarely statistically significant and we fail to detect a consistent effect on the efficiency of the estimation regardless of the strategy applied.
PubMed ID
22054579 View in PubMed
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An adaptive-management framework for optimal control of hiking near golden eagle nests in Denali National Park.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101839
Source
Conserv Biol. 2011 Apr;25(2):316-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Julien Martin
Paul L Fackler
James D Nichols
Michael C Runge
Carol L McIntyre
Bruce L Lubow
Maggie C McCluskie
Joel A Schmutz
Author Affiliation
Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-0485, USA. julienm@ufl.edu
Source
Conserv Biol. 2011 Apr;25(2):316-23
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Animals
Conservation of Natural Resources - methods
Decision Making
Eagles
Endangered Species
Models, Theoretical
Recreation
Risk assessment
Uncertainty
Abstract
Unintended effects of recreational activities in protected areas are of growing concern. We used an adaptive-management framework to develop guidelines for optimally managing hiking activities to maintain desired levels of territory occupancy and reproductive success of Golden Eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in Denali National Park (Alaska, U.S.A.). The management decision was to restrict human access (hikers) to particular nesting territories to reduce disturbance. The management objective was to minimize restrictions on hikers while maintaining reproductive performance of eagles above some specified level. We based our decision analysis on predictive models of site occupancy of eagles developed using a combination of expert opinion and data collected from 93 eagle territories over 20 years. The best predictive model showed that restricting human access to eagle territories had little effect on occupancy dynamics. However, when considering important sources of uncertainty in the models, including environmental stochasticity, imperfect detection of hares on which eagles prey, and model uncertainty, restricting access of territories to hikers improved eagle reproduction substantially. An adaptive management framework such as ours may help reduce uncertainty of the effects of hiking activities on Golden Eagles.
PubMed ID
21342265 View in PubMed
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"An evil heritage": interview study of pain and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95116
Source
Pain Manag Nurs. 2009 Sep;10(3):134-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Heiwe Susanne
Bjuke Monica
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden. susanne.heiwe@karolinska.se
Source
Pain Manag Nurs. 2009 Sep;10(3):134-41
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude to Health
Communication
Cost of Illness
Fatigue - etiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pain - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Patient Education as Topic
Polycystic Kidney, Autosomal Dominant - complications - genetics - therapy
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological - etiology - psychology
Sweden
Uncertainty
Abstract
Pain is a common problem for patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Knowledge about patients' experience of the pain, pain management, and pain's effect on everyday life is, however, limited. In clinical practice there is a need to improve the care of these patients. To be able to do so, information about how the disease and its pain affect the patients is required. This study explores patients' experience of living with ADPKD and its pain. The findings are based on in-depth semistructured interviews. The participants were 22 patients with ADPKD. The data were transcribed and analyzed by using phenomenology. Findings showed that the patients experienced limitations in their everyday life due to inexplicable and unpredictable pain and fatigue. Also, pain management was experienced as suboptimal and pain was seldom discussed at health care appointments. Emotional distress concerning the hereditary nature of the disease was also present. Health care providers need to increase their focus on pain and pain management to reduce the disease's intrusion in patients' everyday life. Also, patients and people in the patients' immediate surroundings need to be given information and education about the disease and its pain as well as the opportunity to talk about their worries concerning heredity. By implementing the findings of the present study when meeting a patient with ADPKD, improved patient satisfaction and health-related quality of life could be accomplished.
PubMed ID
19706350 View in PubMed
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An exploration of the patient navigator role: perspectives of younger women with breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105501
Source
Oncol Nurs Forum. 2014 Jan 1;41(1):77-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2014
Author
Allison E Pedersen
Thomas F Hack
Susan E McClement
Jill Taylor-Brown
Author Affiliation
Winnipeg Regional Health Authority Palliative Care Program.
Source
Oncol Nurs Forum. 2014 Jan 1;41(1):77-88
Date
Jan-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Age Factors
Anxiety - etiology
Breast Neoplasms - nursing - psychology
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Oncology Nursing
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Navigation
Patient Participation
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Role
Social Support
Social Work
Uncertainty
Young Adult
Abstract
To delineate the role of the oncology patient navigator, drawing from the experiences and descriptions of younger women with breast cancer.
Interpretive, descriptive, qualitative research design.
Participants' homes, researcher's home, and via telephone, all in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
12 women aged 50 years or younger who were diagnosed with breast cancer within the last three years.
Face-to-face semistructured interviews explored patient experiences with the cancer care system, including problems encountered, unmet needs, and opinions about the functions of the patient navigator role. The audio-recorded interviews were transcribed and data were broken down and inductively coded into four categories. Constant comparative techniques also were used during analysis.
The role of the oncology patient navigator included two facets: "Processual facets," with the subthemes assigned to me at diagnosis, managing the connection, mapping the process, practical support, and quarterbacking my entire journey; and "Personal qualities: The essentials," with the subthemes empathetic care tenor, knowing the cancer system, and understanding the medical side of breast cancer.
Despite the tremendous effort directed toward enhancing care for younger women undergoing treatment for breast cancer, gaps continue to exist. Younger women with breast cancer require a care approach providing ongoing dialogue, teaching, and emotional support from the point of diagnosis through treatment, including transitions of care within the oncology setting and back to their primary care practitioner.
Oncology nurse navigators are well positioned to provide patients with anticipatory guidance from diagnosis to the end of treatment.
Notes
Comment In: Oncol Nurs Forum. 2014 Jan 1;41(1):89-9124368242
PubMed ID
24368241 View in PubMed
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Anxiety and health-related quality of life in patients awaiting elective coronary angiography.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179209
Source
Heart Lung. 2004 Jul-Aug;33(4):237-48
Publication Type
Article
Author
Wynne J De Jong-Watt
Heather M Arthur
Author Affiliation
Roge Valley Health System, Centenary Health Center Site and Cardiac Care Network of Ontario, Scarborough, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Heart Lung. 2004 Jul-Aug;33(4):237-48
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Angina Pectoris - psychology - radiography
Anxiety - etiology - psychology
Canada
Chest Pain - psychology - radiography
Coronary Angiography - psychology
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Design
Severity of Illness Index
Sickness Impact Profile
Uncertainty
Waiting Lists
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to document the impact of waiting for first-time elective coronary angiography (CA) on patients' anxiety and health-related quality of life (HRQL).
A prospective, observational inception cohort pretest and posttest design was used.
The study was conducted in a tertiary community cardiac center in Toronto, Canada.
Disease-specific HRQL was measured using the Seattle Angina Questionnaire at baseline (Time 1 [T1]) and 1 week before CA (Time 2 [T2]). The association between time on the waiting list and subjects' perceived anxiety was analyzed.
Paired-sample t tests comparing mean anxiety levels at T1 and T2 indicated a statistically significant increase in anxiety levels at T2 that did not seem to be related to the waiting time for CA (P =.000). Comparison of mean Seattle Angina Questionnaire scores at T1 and T2 indicated a trend toward deterioration in HRQL over time.
Waiting for elective CA may have a negative impact on patients' psychologic status and HRQL. Nursing and clinical interventions to reduce anxiety and improve HRQL are indicated for this population.
PubMed ID
15252414 View in PubMed
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253 records – page 1 of 26.