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378 records – page 1 of 38.

A 3-year follow-up of sun behavior in patients with cutaneous malignant melanoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106960
Source
JAMA Dermatol. 2014 Feb;150(2):163-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Luise Winkel Idorn
Pameli Datta
Jakob Heydenreich
Peter Alshede Philipsen
Hans Christian Wulf
Author Affiliation
Dermatological Research Department D92, Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
JAMA Dermatol. 2014 Feb;150(2):163-8
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Melanoma - etiology - pathology
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Skin Neoplasms - etiology - pathology
Sunlight - adverse effects
Time Factors
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
Abstract
IMPORTANCE UV radiation (UVR) exposure is the primary environmental risk factor for developing cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). OBJECTIVE To measure changes in sun behavior from the first until the third summer after the diagnosis of CMM using matched controls as a reference. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Three-year follow-up, observational, case-control study performed from May 7 to September 22, 2009, April 17 to September 15, 2010, and May 6 to July 31, 2011, at a university hospital in Denmark of 21 patients with CMM and 21 controls matched to patients by sex, age, occupation, and constitutive skin type participated in the study. Exposure to UVR was assessed the first and second summers (n=20) and the first and third summers (n=22) after diagnosis. Data from 40 participants were analyzed. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Exposure to UVR was assessed by personal electronic UVR dosimeters that measured time-related UVR in standard erythema dose (SED) and corresponding sun diaries (mean, 74 days per participant each participation year). RESULTS Patients' daily UVR dose and UVR dose in connection with various behaviors increased during follow-up (quantified as an increase in daily UVR dose each year; all days: mean, 0.3 SED; 95% CI, 0.05-0.5 SED; days with body exposure: mean, 0.6 SED; 95% CI, 0.07-1.2 SED; holidays: mean, 1.2 SED; 95% CI, 0.3-2.1 SED; days abroad: 1.9 SED; 95% CI, 0.4-3.4 SED; and holidays with body exposure: mean, 2.3 SED; 95% CI, 1.1-3.4 SED). After the second year of follow-up, patients' UVR dose was higher than that of controls, who maintained a stable UVR dose. No difference was found between groups in the number of days with body exposure or the number of days using sunscreen in the second and third years of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Our findings suggest that patients with CMM do not maintain a cautious sun behavior in connection with an increase in UVR exposure, especially on days with body exposure, when abroad, and on holidays.
PubMed ID
24080851 View in PubMed
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7 years experience of photopatch testing with sunscreen allergens in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33993
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1998 Feb;38(2):61-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
B. Berne
A M Ros
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Contact Dermatitis. 1998 Feb;38(2):61-4
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Allergens - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Child
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - diagnosis - etiology
Dermatitis, Photoallergic - diagnosis - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multicenter Studies
Patch Tests
Severity of Illness Index
Skin - drug effects - pathology - radiation effects
Sunscreening Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Sweden
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
Urticaria - chemically induced
Abstract
Since 1990 7 sunscreen allergens have been included in the standard photopatch protocol at 2 Swedish dermatology clinics. 355 consecutive patients with suspected photosensitivity were tested, and in 28 of these (7.9%), a total of 42 allergic reactions were found. 80% of the reactions were of photocontact origin. The most common allergen was benzophenone-3 (Eusolex 4360), with 15 photocontact and 1 contact allergic reactions, followed by isopropyl dibenzoylmethane (Eusolex 8020) (8 photocontact, 4 contact) and butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane (Parsol 1789), with 6 photocontact reactions. There were 2 cases of photocontact allergy to phenylbenzimidazole sulfonic acid (Eusolex 232), which has not been reported previously. 1 case of contact urticaria from benzophenone-3 was accidentally found. In addition, 21 + reactions of doubtful relevance were noted in 14 patients: 16 on irradiated and 5 on non-irradiated test sites. Among these, irritant and phototoxic reactions may be included. These results indicate that the inclusion of UV filters in the standard photopatch protocol is important. Immediate-type testing for urticaria could also be of value.
PubMed ID
9506215 View in PubMed
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25-hydroxyvitamin D accumulation during summer in elderly women at latitude 60 degrees N.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149948
Source
J Intern Med. 2009 Nov;266(5):476-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Ann Burgaz
A. Akesson
K. Michaëlsson
A. Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. ann.burgaz@ki.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2009 Nov;266(5):476-83
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Seasons
Sunlight
Sweden
Ultraviolet Rays
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
During half of the year, cutaneous synthesis of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) is not detectable at northern latitudes, leaving the population dependent on other sources for optimal vitamin D status. During April to September, 25(OH)D status may be improved by solar exposure. In this study, we measured seasonal differences in serum 25(OH)D concentrations and identified the major predictors of summer 25(OH)D concentrations.
We assessed serum 25(OH)D concentrations during both winter and summer amongst 100 women, aged 61-83 years, randomly sampled from the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Participants completed two detailed questionnaires covering diet, use of dietary supplements and sun-related behaviour, the first in January through March and a second time in August through September.
The mean seasonal increase in serum 25(OH)D concentrations was 38% from mean 72 +/- 23 nmol L(-1) during winter to 99 +/- 29 nmol L(-1) in summer. High summer 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with higher winter concentrations, preference of staying in sun instead of shade, having a nonsensitive skin type and normal body mass index. Based on multiple linear regression modelling, preferring sun, having nonsensitive skin type and normal weight as compared with preferring shade, having sensitive skin type and being obese, was associated with a 64 nmol L(-1) higher 25(OH)D concentrations during summer.
Women with high winter 25(OH)D serum concentrations, with preference of staying in the sun instead of shade during summer, a skin type allowing for longer sun exposure and a normal weight had the highest summer 25(OH)D concentrations.
PubMed ID
19570054 View in PubMed
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Accessibility to air travel correlates strongly with increasing melanoma incidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16510
Source
Melanoma Res. 2006 Feb;16(1):77-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Yolanda Z Agredano
Joanna L Chan
Ranch C Kimball
Alexa B Kimball
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California, USA.
Source
Melanoma Res. 2006 Feb;16(1):77-81
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft
Comparative Study
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Holidays - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Income - statistics & numerical data
Melanoma - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Sunlight
Travel - statistics & numerical data
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
As the cost of air travel has decreased substantially in the USA and Europe over the past few decades, leisure travel to vacation destinations during the winter months has expanded significantly. This trend has probably increased the incidence of significant ultraviolet radiation exposure and sunburn in a broader population who could not previously afford this kind of travel. The purpose of this study was to analyse the correlation between increasing accessibility to air travel and melanoma incidence. This ecological study surveyed air travel patterns and melanoma incidence over the past three decades. Melanoma age-adjusted incidence was obtained from the United States Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results 9 Registry Database, 1975-2000, and the Cancer Registry of Norway, 1965-2000. United States mean inflation-adjusted airfare prices for four airports linked to leisure destinations (Miami, Los Angeles, San Diego, Phoenix) were compared with melanoma incidence. Parallel analyses were performed using annual domestic passenger-kilometres and melanoma incidence in Norway. Declining United States leisure-specific airfares corresponded strongly with increasing melanoma incidence (r = 0.96, r = 0.92, P
PubMed ID
16432460 View in PubMed
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[A comparative analysis of the existing standards for exposure to ultraviolet radiation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208776
Source
Usp Fiziol Nauk. 1997 Apr-Jun;28(2):94-106
Publication Type
Article
Author
A D Strzhizhovskii
Source
Usp Fiziol Nauk. 1997 Apr-Jun;28(2):94-106
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Humans
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology
Netherlands
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - standards - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Time Factors
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
United States
Abstract
Quantitative analysis of threshold limit levels of UV-irradiation in the workroom environment established in USA, Netherlands and Russia was made. Comparison of its results with modern information about effective doses and action spectra of UV-radiation biological action allowed to reveal essential differences in the approach to rate setting and in some cases presence of internal contradictions and exceeding of threshold limit levels of UV irradiation above biologically effective values. The possibility of workroom UV standards utilisation for regulation of nature UV-radiation exposures was considered.
PubMed ID
9235809 View in PubMed
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[A consensus statement for the prevention of melanoma. Changes in sunbathing habits are most important. Tanning salons are too popular among young people].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216688
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Dec 14;91(50):4778-82
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Dec-14-1994

Action spectra affect variability of the climatology of biologically effective ultraviolet radiation on cloud-free days.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108780
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2013 Dec;157(4):491-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
D. Grifoni
G. Zipoli
F. Sabatini
G. Messeri
L. Bacci
Author Affiliation
CNR - Institute of Biometeorology, Via Madonna del Piano, 10, Sesto Fiorentino, FI 50019, Italy.
Source
Radiat Prot Dosimetry. 2013 Dec;157(4):491-8
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Atmosphere
Cataract - epidemiology
Climate
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Erythema - epidemiology
Eye - radiation effects
Germany
Humans
Italy
Keratitis - epidemiology
Norway
Plants - radiation effects
Quality Control
Seasons
Ultraviolet Rays
Vitamin D - biosynthesis
Weather
Abstract
Action spectrum (AS) describes the relative effectiveness of ultraviolet (UV) radiation in producing biological effects and allows spectral UV irradiance to be weighted in order to compute biologically effective UV radiation (UVBE). The aim of this research was to study the seasonal and latitudinal distribution over Europe of daily UVBE doses responsible for various biological effects on humans and plants. Clear sky UV radiation spectra were computed at 30-min time intervals for the first day of each month of the year for Rome, Potsdam and Trondheim using a radiative transfer model fed with climatological data. Spectral data were weighted using AS for erythema, vitamin D synthesis, cataract and photokeratitis for humans, while the generalised plant damage and the plant damage AS were used for plants. The daily UVBE doses for the above-mentioned biological processes were computed and are analysed in this study. The patterns of variation due to season (for each location) and latitude (for each date) resulted as being specific for each adopted AS. The biological implications of these results are briefly discussed highlighting the importance of a specific UVBE climatology for each biological process.
PubMed ID
23843425 View in PubMed
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Aerobiology in the operating room--a review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature233569
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1988 Feb;11 Suppl A:68-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1988
Author
A. Hambraeus
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Bacteriology, University of Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
J Hosp Infect. 1988 Feb;11 Suppl A:68-76
Date
Feb-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Microbiology
Bacteriological Techniques
Clothing
Humans
Operating Rooms - standards
Surgical Wound Infection - prevention & control
Sweden
Temperature
Ultraviolet Rays
Ventilation
PubMed ID
2896749 View in PubMed
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Aetiology of spheroidal degeneration of the cornea in Labrador.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244607
Source
Br J Ophthalmol. 1981 Apr;65(4):270-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1981
Author
G J Johnson
Source
Br J Ophthalmol. 1981 Apr;65(4):270-83
Date
Apr-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Corneal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Humidity
Ice
Male
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Snow
Temperature
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
Wind
Abstract
To determine the aetiology of spheroidal degeneration of the cornea (Labrador keratopathy), total population surveys were conducted in 5 communities in coastal Labrador and northern Newfoundland. For 4 years records were also kept on all clinic patients aged 40 or more throughout the region. Both methods gave a peak prevalence at latitudes 55 degrees--56 degrees north. The greatest severity and earliest age of onset occurred around the same latitudes. Of the proposed environmental causative agents only ultraviolet radiation, reflected from ice and snow, explains the distribution of the disease. The high cumulative UV dosage is due to the unique geographical and climatic features of the region.
Notes
Cites: Exp Eye Res. 1965 Dec;4(4):355-635867355
Cites: Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1972;50(4):532-84678271
Cites: Am J Ophthalmol. 1972 Nov;74(5):821-84539458
Cites: Arch Ophthalmol. 1973 Jan;89(1):36-454630887
Cites: Arch Ophthalmol. 1973 Mar;89(3):193-74120598
Cites: Can J Ophthalmol. 1973 Apr;8(2):298-3054541018
Cites: Acta Ophthalmol (Copenh). 1974;52(6):777-854549005
Cites: Can J Ophthalmol. 1975 Apr;10(2):119-351125837
Cites: Am J Pathol. 1977 Dec;89(3):718-808339743
Cites: Br J Ophthalmol. 1978 Jan;62(1):53-61629911
Cites: Arch Ophthalmol. 1965 Aug;74:198-20214318495
PubMed ID
7236572 View in PubMed
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378 records – page 1 of 38.