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An analysis of respiratory activity, Q(10), and microbial community composition of soils from high and low tussock sites at Toolik, Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99462
Source
J Eukaryot Microbiol. 2010 Mar;57(2):218-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
O Roger Anderson
Author Affiliation
Department of Biology, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, Palisades, New York 10964, USA. ora@ldeo.columbia.edu
Source
J Eukaryot Microbiol. 2010 Mar;57(2):218-9
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Bacteria - isolation & purification - metabolism
Biodiversity
Eukaryota - isolation & purification - metabolism
Oxygen consumption
Soil Microbiology
Ubiquinone - analogs & derivatives - analysis
Abstract
High latitude microbial communities, incurring increased global warming, are a potential major source of respiratory CO2 contributing to an enhanced greenhouse effect. Data on respiration and microbial density are presented for a moist, high tussock site compared with a low, water saturated site. The density of bacteria and eukaryotic microbes was nearly equivalent at both sites and potentially could yield substantial release of respiratory CO2 with continued warming. Respiratory rates for soil from the high site were greater than the low. The Q(10) of 2.4 for the high tussock sample was approximately 1.3 x that of the low site sample (Q(10) of 1.7).
PubMed ID
20021543 View in PubMed
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The coenzyme Q10 content of the average Danish diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61962
Source
Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 1997;67(2):123-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
C. Weber
A. Bysted
G. Hllmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Biochemistry and Nutrition, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby.
Source
Int J Vitam Nutr Res. 1997;67(2):123-9
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cereals - metabolism
Denmark
Diet
Eating
Eggs - analysis
Fats - analysis
Fishes - metabolism
Food analysis
Fruit - metabolism
Humans
Meat - analysis
Poultry - metabolism
Ubiquinone - analogs & derivatives - analysis - metabolism
Vegetables - metabolism
Vitamin E - analysis
Abstract
The average dietary intake of coenzyme Q10 and coenzyme Q9 of the Danish population was determined, based on food consumption data from a national dietary survey. Selected food items in edible form were analyzed for the coenzyme Q content by HPCL with UV-detection, and their contribution to the total intake calculated. The effect of cooking was a 14-32% destruction of coenzyme Q10 by frying, and no detectable destruction by boiling. The average coenzyme Q10 intake of the Danish population was estimated to 3-5 mg/day, primarily derived from meat and poultry (64% of the daily intake), while cereals, fruit, edible fats, and vegetables only make minor contributions. The intake of coenzyme Q10 is approximately 1 mg/day, primarily derived from vegetable fats and cereals. The alpha-tocopherol content of the selected food samples was analyzed by HPLC with fluorescence detection, and the calculated average intake of alpha-tocopherol was comparable to the estimate from the dietary survey (7-8 vs. 7.4 mg alpha-tocopherol/day, respectively). The commercially available dietary supplements (capsules) provide 10-30 mg CoQ10/day, thus the average diet. The optimal dietary intake of coenzyme Q10 is unknown.
PubMed ID
9129255 View in PubMed
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