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37 records – page 1 of 4.

Air space reduction tympanomastoidectomy repairs difficult perforations more reliably than tympanoplasty.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115007
Source
Laryngoscope. 2014 Jun;124 Suppl 3:S1-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Miriam I Redleaf
Author Affiliation
Department of Otology/Neurotology, University of Illinois-Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.
Source
Laryngoscope. 2014 Jun;124 Suppl 3:S1-13
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Mastoid - surgery
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Treatment Outcome
Tympanic Membrane - surgery
Tympanic Membrane Perforation - surgery
Tympanoplasty - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Air space reduction tympanomastoidectomy improves outcomes over tympanoplasty in repairing tympanic membrane perforations in the presence of unfavorable risk factors.
Retrospective review of 67 subjects' 87 operations.
Interventions were tympanoplasty versus air space reduction tympanomastoidectomy. Risk factors were contracted mastoid air cells, previous failed operations, descent from the indigenous peoples of the Americas, and middle/ear mastoid volumes l
PubMed ID
23553170 View in PubMed
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[Anesthesia in ear surgery. A resource economical analysis and patient assessment of general anesthesia versus local anesthesia in ear surgery].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229030
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 May 28;152(22):1595-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-28-1990
Author
U K Andreassen
C B Larsen
Author Affiliation
Københavns Amts Sygehus i Glostrup, øreafdelingen.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1990 May 28;152(22):1595-7
Date
May-28-1990
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anesthesia, General - economics
Anesthesia, Local - economics - methods
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Denmark
Ear, Middle - surgery
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Tympanoplasty
Abstract
Although it has long been known that surgery on the middle ear may be carried out under local anaesthesia (LA), the majority of ear operations in Denmark are carried out under general anaesthesia (GA). A prospective review is presented of 103 ear operations of which 71 were undertaken under local anaesthesia and 32 under general anaesthesia. Local anaesthesia has considerable advantages as compared with general anaesthesia, particularly that the anaesthetic capacity is released and can be employed for other purposes. Employment of local anaesthesia does not present any disadvantages for the surgeon and the procedure appears to be acceptable for the majority of patients. In order not to bring the procedure into disrepute, patients should be assessed meticulously preoperatively by an experienced surgeon so that operation under local anaesthesia is not performed in unsuitable patients.
PubMed ID
2113730 View in PubMed
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Autofibrin glue compound and its utilization during reconstructive operations on the ear.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33307
Source
Rev Laryngol Otol Rhinol (Bord). 1999;120(1):53-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
N Y Shatkovskaya
Y A Soushko
K N Veremeyenko
A I Kizim
O N Borissenko
Author Affiliation
Institute Kolomiitchenko, Tympanoplastic Department, Kiev, Ukrainia.
Source
Rev Laryngol Otol Rhinol (Bord). 1999;120(1):53-6
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Chronic Disease
Ear - surgery
Female
Fibrin Tissue Adhesive
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Otitis Media, Suppurative - surgery
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - methods
Tissue Adhesives
Tympanoplasty - methods
Abstract
A new autofibrin glue compound (AFGC) is suggested. The experiment has demonstrated that the inclusion of antibiotics and lysozyme does not influence its adhesive qualities or sterilization with gamma radiation. It has been revealed that the dose to sterilise the compound was 75 Gy. AFGC was used during tympanoplasties in 55 patients for fixation of ossiculoplasties, fascia autotransplant and skin of the external auditory meatus. Morphological and functional results of tympanoplasties turned out to be better than those of the control group in which the glue was not used.
PubMed ID
10371867 View in PubMed
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Chlorhexidine ototoxicity in ear surgery, part 1: review of the literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126146
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011 Dec;40(6):437-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Philip Lai
Chris Coulson
David D Pothier
John Rutka
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON.
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011 Dec;40(6):437-40
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Infective Agents, Local - toxicity
Canada
Chlorhexidine - administration & dosage - toxicity
Deafness - chemically induced
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Ear, Inner - drug effects
Ear, Middle - drug effects
Humans
Myringoplasty
Tympanoplasty
Abstract
Chlorhexidine is a common antiseptic used to prevent surgical infection. However, its exposure to the middle ear may lead to deafness. The mechanisms of the ototoxicity of chlorhexidine are reviewed. The importance of recognizing its toxicity cannot be overstated in preventing injury to patients undergoing ear surgery.
A systematic literature search was performed looking at data from human and animal studies. Search engines included MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library, CENTRAL, CINAHL, and Web of Science to November 1, 2010, for relevant studies published in all languages. Two independent reviewers (P.L. and D.D.P.) screened the references from published articles for additional relevant studies. Medical Subject Headings and key words including intervention (chlorhexidine, antiseptic), exposure (myringoplasty, intratympanic), and adverse effects (sensorineural hearing loss, ototoxicity, vestibular toxicity) were used.
Twelve studies were identified, two of which were non-English and were excluded. Only 2 articles on human subjects and 12 articles on animal models concerning chlorhexidine ototoxicity were identified.
Chlorhexidine in both human studies and animal models demonstrates ototoxicity if it reaches the inner ear. The toxicity of chlorhexidine appears to be related to its concentration and probable contact time with the round window membrane intraoperatively. It is conceivable that the incidence of chlorhexidine toxicity may be higher than stated if unrecognized or has resulted in subsequent medicolegal actions. From the evidence available, safer preparation solutions are available without clinical risks for ototoxicity should surgeons continue with this practice.
PubMed ID
22420428 View in PubMed
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Chlorhexidine ototoxicity in ear surgery part II: survey of preparation solution used by otolaryngologists in Canada: is there a cause for concern?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126145
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011 Dec;40(6):441-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Philip Lai
Chris Coulson
David Pothier
John Rutka
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Toronto.
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2011 Dec;40(6):441-5
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Infective Agents, Local - administration & dosage - toxicity
Canada
Chlorhexidine - administration & dosage - toxicity
Deafness - chemically induced
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Ear, Middle - drug effects
Guideline Adherence
Health Surveys
Humans
Povidone-Iodine - administration & dosage - toxicity
Questionnaires
Tympanoplasty
Utilization Review
Abstract
To conduct a survey of the antiseptic preparations used for ear surgeries among otolaryngologists in Canada.
An electronic survey was sent to active members of the Canadian Society of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery via e-mail. Questions included the use of antiseptic, choice of preparation solution, duration of preparation, use of a barrier method, and compliance with hospital protocol changes.
The e-mail was received by 253 otolaryngologists, and 85 completed the survey. Four of 85 respondents did not perform tympanoplasty surgery and were not included in the analysis. Of those who performed tympanoplasty (n ?=? 81), 78 of the 81 respondents (96%) used an antiseptic preparation solution at surgery, whereas 3 respondents (4%) did not. Sixty-six of the 77 respondents (86%) used aqueous povidone-iodine, 4 (5%) used a chlorhexidine-based preparation, 3 (4%) used an alcohol-based solution, 3 (4%) used others, and 1 answered "I don't know." Thirty-eight of 75 (29%) respondents used a barrier method, 23 (31%) answered "always," 18 (24%) answered "sometimes," and 5 (7%) answered "I don't know." When asked if they would comply with a hypothetical hospital policy to use chlorhexidine in ear surgery, 15 of 79 (19%) respondents agreed, whereas 64 (81%) disagreed. Among the aqueous povidone-iodine users (n ?=? 66), 7 (11%) agreed to change to chlorhexidine.
There is a wide variation in practice in the use of surgical preparation solution among otolaryngologists performing ear surgery. Surgeons must be vigilant to avoid ototoxicity. A national society consensus on appropriate preparation solutions for ear surgery would minimize patients' risk and minimize future medicolegal actions.
PubMed ID
22420429 View in PubMed
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Chronic ear disease along the coasts of Labrador and northern Newfoundland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286844
Source
Journal of Otolaryngology. 5(2):122-129.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Author
Ratnesar, P.
Author Affiliation
Southeast Thames Regional Health Authority
Source
Journal of Otolaryngology. 5(2):122-129.
Date
1976
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Nain
Hopedale
Makkovik
Northwest River
Otitis media
Cholesteatoma
Tympanoplasty
Nursing stations
Tympanosclerosis
Otorrhea
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage.
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Chronic ear disease along the coasts of Labrador and northern Newfoundland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2020
Source
Journal of Otolaryngology. 1976 Apr;5(2):122-129.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Author
Ratnesar, P.
Author Affiliation
Southeast Thames Regional Health Authority
Source
Journal of Otolaryngology. 1976 Apr;5(2):122-129.
Date
1976
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Nain
Hopedale
Makkovik
Northwest River
Cholesteatoma
Tympanoplasty
Nursing stations
Tympanosclerosis
Otorrhea
Cholesteatoma - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Ear Diseases - epidemiology - therapy
European Continental Ancestry Group
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Newfoundland
Otitis Media - epidemiology
Otosclerosis - epidemiology
Abstract
The high incidence of chronic ear disease among the three ethnic groups, Eskimo, Algonkian Indians, and Caucasians living under the same environmental conditions is studied. The role of socio-economic factors in the incidence and sequelae of ear disease in this population was similar to other studies among the native peoples of Alaska, Canada, and Greenland. The variation in the disease pattern in the different ethnic groups was shown to be related to the aeration of the middle ear cleft. The air cell system of the mastoid is determined by x-rays and/or surgical exploration, but the patency of the Eustachian tube and its size is determined by impedance audiometry and use of ureteric catheters. The clinical and surgical findings of the behavior of chronic ear disease in the different ethnic groups is correlated to tissue culture experiments. The role of lowered oxygen tension in the formation and behavior of cholesteatoma is illustrated well among the Caucasians with poor aeration of the middle ear cleft who show a high incidence of cholesteatoma, unlike the Eskimos with good aeration who show a complete absence of cholesteatoma.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2445.
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Chronic otitis media and hearing loss in the Eskimo population of Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221
Source
Laryngoscope. 1977 Sep;87(9 Pt 1):1528-1542.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977
Author
Baxter, J.D.
Author Affiliation
McGill University
Source
Laryngoscope. 1977 Sep;87(9 Pt 1):1528-1542.
Date
1977
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Spence Bay
Frobisher Bay
Inuvik
Aklavik
Tuktoyaktuk
Holman
Coppermine
Cambridge Bay
Gjoa Haven
Pelly Bay
Acculturation
Diet, general
Noise
Surgery
Acetic Acids - therapeutic use
Bacitracin - therapeutic use
Canada
Chronic Disease
Drug Combinations
Ethanol - therapeutic use
Fluocinolone Acetonide - therapeutic use
Hearing Disorders - drug therapy - surgery - therapy
Humans
Inuits
Neomycin - therapeutic use
Otitis Media - drug therapy - surgery - therapy
Polymyxins - therapeutic use
Referral and Consultation
Tympanoplasty
Tyrothricin - therapeutic use
Abstract
Chronic otitis media and hearing loss is a major health problem today in the Canadian Eskimo. The subject is reviewed and the findings of projects and a survey that have been carried out recently are discussed. A modality of treatment is proposed which is based upon the findings of the projects, the survey and other information that is available at the present time.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2392.
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Chronic otitis media in Alaskan Natives: 1954-1979. An historical perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2496
Source
Alaska Medicine. 1979 Jul; 21(4):48-52.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
Tower, E.A.
Author Affiliation
Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
Source
Alaska Medicine. 1979 Jul; 21(4):48-52.
Date
1979
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Otitis Media - epidemiology - history
Health services
Tympanoplasty
Myringotomy
Adenotonsillectomy
Alaska
Chronic Disease History, 20th Century
Humans
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 662.
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Chronic otitis media in the Keewatin area of the Northwest Territories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1637
Source
Journal of Otolaryngology. 1990 Dec;19(6):389-390.
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1990
Author
McCullough, D.W.
Source
Journal of Otolaryngology. 1990 Dec;19(6):389-390.
Date
Dec-1990
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Epistaxis
Hearing deficiency
Otitis media
Otorrhea
Tympanoplasty
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Northwest Territories - epidemiology
Otitis Media - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2439.
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37 records – page 1 of 4.