Skip header and navigation

Refine By

64 records – page 1 of 7.

Can genetic factors explain the spillover of warmth and negativity across family relationships?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77449
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2007 Apr;10(2):299-313
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Ganiban Jody M
Spotts Erica L
Lichtenstein Paul
Khera Gagan S
Reiss David
Neiderhiser Jenae M
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052, USA. ganiban@gwu.edu
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2007 Apr;10(2):299-313
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Family Relations
Female
Genetics, Behavioral
Humans
Male
Marriage - psychology
Middle Aged
Parent-Child Relations
Questionnaires
Registries
Sweden
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics - psychology
Abstract
Previous studies indicate that the emotional quality of marital relationships is mirrored in parent-child relationships. We explored the degree to which these associations are explained by genetic and environmental factors. Participants were drawn from the Twin and Offspring Study in Sweden (TOSS), and included 544 female twin pairs (258 monozygotic [MZ], 286 dizygotic [DZ]), and 311 male twin pairs (128 MZ, 183 DZ). The spouses and one adolescent child of each twin also participated in this study. The twins completed self-report measures that assessed their marital quality and their warmth and negativity towards their children. Observational ratings of marital warmth and negativity, and of maternal warmth and negativity were obtained for a subset of female twin pairs (150 MZ, 176 DZ). Self-reported marital satisfaction was associated with self-reported parental warmth and negativity for mothers (rs = .25, -.36) and fathers (rs = .25, -.44). For the observational measures, marital warmth was associated with maternal warmth (r = .42), while marital negativity was associated with maternal negativity (r = .34). On average genetic factors explained nearly half of the covariance between self-reported marital satisfaction and parenting for mothers (48%) and fathers (47%). Genetic factors explained 21% of the covariance between observed marital and maternal warmth, but did not contribute to associations between marital and maternal negativity. These findings indicate that parents' genetically influenced characteristics help shape the emotional climate of the family.
PubMed ID
17564519 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changes in heritability across increasing levels of behavior problems in young twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34743
Source
Behav Genet. 1996 Jul;26(4):419-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
H. Gjone
J. Stevenson
J M Sundet
D E Eilertsen
Author Affiliation
National Centre for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Behav Genet. 1996 Jul;26(4):419-26
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - genetics - psychology
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diseases in Twins - genetics - psychology
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Norway
Personality Assessment
Phenotype
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Environment
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics - psychology
Abstract
The present study addresses the issue of differential heritability with increasing severity of parent-reported internalizing and externalizing behavior problems assessed by the Child Behavior Checklist. The sample includes 526 identical and 389 fraternal same-sexed twin pairs from five national birth cohorts, aged 5-6, 8-9, and 12-15 years. Heritability (h2), common environment (c2), and changes in these parameters as a function of proband score were analyzed by multiple regression models (Cherny et al., 1992). Internalizing and externalizing behavior showed significant heritability. A small increment in h2 and a reduction of c2 with increasing severity of externalizing behavior were independent of sex and age. For internalizing behavior h2 increased and c2 declined with increasing severity for the 5-6 and 8-9 year olds. Logarithmic transformation of scores lowered h2 and increased c2, particularly for externalizing behavior. The changes in heritability with severity were nonsignificant for the transformed variables.
PubMed ID
8771902 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changing environmental influences on substance use across development.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163053
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2007 Apr;10(2):315-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Danielle M Dick
Jason L Pagan
Richard Viken
Shaun Purcell
Jaakko Kaprio
Lea Pulkkinen
Richard J Rose
Author Affiliation
Washington University, Department of Psychiatry, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. dickd@wustl.edu
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2007 Apr;10(2):315-26
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Psychology
Alcohol Drinking - genetics - psychology
Child
Cohort Studies
Environment
Female
Finland
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Parenting
Peer Group
Phenotype
Questionnaires
Smoking - genetics - psychology
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics - psychology
Abstract
In contrast to many phenotypes that have been studied using twin designs, substance use shows considerable evidence of environmental influence. Accordingly, specifying the relevant environments and understanding the nature of their effects is an important research priority. Twin studies also have demonstrated that the importance of genetic and environmental influences varies across development for a variety of behavioral outcomes, including substance use. Here, we report analyses exploring moderating effects associated with parenting and peer characteristics on adolescent smoking and drinking, measured at ages 14 and 17. We find significant evidence of moderating effects associated with two dimensions of parenting (parental monitoring and time spent in activities with parents) on adolescent smoking, measured at two time points across development, but no moderating effects on adolescent drinking. Genetic influences on smoking increased, and common environmental effects decreased, as adolescents reported less parental monitoring and spending more time with their parents. Conversely, we find evidence that adolescent drinking is more strongly influenced by peer characteristics. The importance of genetic predispositions was increased among adolescents who reported more friends who used alcohol. These analyses illustrate the importance of incorporating measured aspects of the environment into genetically informative twin models to begin to understand how specific environments are related to various outcomes. Furthermore, they illustrate the importance of using a developmental perspective to understand how specific influences may vary across different ages, and across different phenotypes.
Notes
Cites: Pediatrics. 1994 Jun;93(6 Pt 2):1060-48197008
Cites: J Abnorm Psychol. 1993 Feb;102(1):3-198436697
Cites: Hum Biol. 1995 Oct;67(5):739-538543288
Cites: J Stud Alcohol Suppl. 1999 Mar;13:63-7410225489
Cites: Behav Genet. 2005 Jul;35(4):491-815971029
Cites: Genes Brain Behav. 2005 Nov;4(8):466-8116268991
Cites: Child Dev. 2005 Nov-Dec;76(6):1217-3316274436
Cites: Hum Genet. 2006 Apr;119(3):312-2116463022
Cites: Twin Res. 1999 Dec;2(4):274-8510723806
Cites: Dev Psychol. 2000 May;36(3):366-8010830980
Cites: Child Dev. 2000 Jul-Aug;71(4):1072-8511016567
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2001 May;25(5):637-4311371711
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2001 Nov;25(11):1594-60411707634
Cites: J Abnorm Psychol. 2001 Nov;110(4):625-3211727951
Cites: J Neurobiol. 2003 Jan;54(1):4-4512486697
Cites: Twin Res. 2002 Dec;5(6):554-7112573187
Cites: Twin Res. 2002 Oct;5(5):366-7112537860
Cites: Child Dev. 2003 Jan-Feb;74(1):109-2612625439
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2003 Apr 1;69(3):253-6212633911
Cites: Int J Eat Disord. 2003 Apr;33(3):287-9212655625
Cites: Psychol Sci. 2003 May;14(3):273-712741753
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2003 Aug;33(2):60-7012890596
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2003 Aug;33(2):108-1812890602
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2003 Nov;44(8):1130-4414626455
Cites: Psychol Sci. 2003 Nov;14(6):623-814629696
Cites: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 1988;14(4):487-983232681
Cites: Behav Genet. 1991 May;21(3):257-691863259
Cites: Behav Genet. 1994 May;24(3):239-587945154
PubMed ID
17564520 View in PubMed
Less detail

Childhood attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder as an extreme of a continuous trait: a quantitative genetic study of 8,500 twin pairs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131220
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2012 Jan;53(1):73-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Henrik Larsson
Henrik Anckarsater
Maria Råstam
Zheng Chang
Paul Lichtenstein
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. henrik.larsson@ki.se
Source
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2012 Jan;53(1):73-80
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Cohort Studies
Diseases in Twins - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Genetic Linkage - genetics
Genetic Testing
Health Surveys - methods - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Although the clinical utility of categorically defined attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is well established, there is also strong evidence supporting the notion of ADHD as an extreme of a continuous trait. Nevertheless, the question of whether the etiology is the same for different levels of DSM-IV ADHD symptoms remains to be investigated. The aim of this study was to assess genetic links between the extreme and the subthreshold range of ADHD symptoms.
Parents of all Swedish 9- and 12-year-old twins born between 1992 and 2000 were interviewed for DSM-IV ADHD symptoms and associated conditions. Two validated cutoff values were used for screening and assigning research diagnoses. Response rate was 80%. Twin methods were applied to investigate the extent to which ADHD is etiologically distinct from subthreshold variations in ADHD symptoms.
Extremes analyses indicated a strong genetic link between the extreme and the subthreshold variation, with almost identical group heritability estimates around .60 for the diagnostic (prevalence 1.78%) and screening (prevalence 9.75%) criteria of ADHD.
A strong genetic link between the extreme and the subthreshold variation of DSM-IV based assessments of ADHD symptoms was found. The data suggest that ADHD is best viewed as the quantitative extreme of genetic and environmental factors operating dimensionally throughout the distribution of ADHD symptoms, indicating that the same etiologic factors are involved in the full range of symptoms of inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity.
PubMed ID
21923806 View in PubMed
Less detail

Child maltreatment and adult violent offending: population-based twin study addressing the 'cycle of violence' hypothesis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128085
Source
Psychol Med. 2012 Sep;42(9):1977-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
M. Forsman
N. Långström
Author Affiliation
Centre for Violence Prevention, Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. mats.forsman@ki.se
Source
Psychol Med. 2012 Sep;42(9):1977-83
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Case-Control Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Criminals - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Gene-Environment Interaction
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Social Environment
Sweden
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics - psychology
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Associations between child maltreatment and adult violence, often termed the 'cycle of violence', are well documented. However, the nature of such links after appropriate control for confounding remains uncertain. We aimed to determine whether child maltreatment causes adult violent offending or whether suggested links are due to genetic or family environment confounding.
A total of 18 083 20- to 47-year-old twins from the Swedish population-based Study of Twin Adults: Genes and Environment (STAGE) participated. We linked information on self-reported child maltreatment with national register data on convictions for adult crime. We used a case-control design to elucidate associations among unrelated individuals and also conducted within-discordant twin pair analyses to estimate the influence of familial confounding on this association.
The odds ratio (OR), adjusted for age, sex and education, for violent offending in maltreated children grown up versus unrelated controls was 1.98 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.52-2.57]. However, the association decreased to 1.18 (95% CI 0.62-2.25) when maltreated children were compared to their non-maltreated twins, suggesting substantial confounding by genetic or family environmental factors (within-twin OR1.00). Familial confounding was also pronounced for the association between child maltreatment and any offending.
Childhood maltreatment was found to be a weak causal risk factor for adult violent offending; hence, reducing maltreatment might decrease violent crime less than previously expected. Instead, considerable familial confounding of the link between child maltreatment and adult violent offending suggests that prevention strategies need to address overlapping genetic and/or family environmental liability for abusive and violent behavior.
PubMed ID
22236772 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cognitive function in unaffected twins discordant for affective disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82076
Source
Psychol Med. 2006 Aug;36(8):1119-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Christensen Maj Vinberg
Kyvik Kirsten Ohm
Kessing Lars Vedel
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. Maj.Vinberg@rh.dk
Source
Psychol Med. 2006 Aug;36(8):1119-29
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bipolar Disorder - diagnosis - genetics - psychology
Cognition Disorders - diagnosis - genetics - psychology
Denmark
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - genetics - psychology
Diseases in Twins - diagnosis - genetics - psychology
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Humans
Individuality
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Phenotype
Psychometrics
Risk
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics - psychology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Patients may present with cognitive impairment in the euthymic phase of affective disorder, but it is unclear whether the impairment is prevalent before onset of the illness. The aim of the present study was to examine the hypothesis that genetic liability to affective disorder is associated with cognitive impairment. METHOD: In a cross-sectional high-risk case-control study, healthy monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins with (High-Risk twins) and without (the control group/Low-Risk twins) a co-twin history of affective disorder were identified through nationwide registers. Cognitive performance of 203 High-Risk and Low-Risk twins was compared. RESULTS: Healthy twins discordant for unipolar disorder showed lower performance on almost all measures of cognitive function: selective and sustained attention, executive function, language processing and working and declarative memory, and also after adjustment for demographic variables, subclinical symptoms and minor psychopathology. Healthy twins discordant for bipolar disorder showed lower performance on tests measuring episodic and working memory, also after adjustment for the above-mentioned covariables. The discrete cognitive impairment found seemed to be related to genetic liability, as the MZ High-Risk twins showed significant impairment on selective and sustained attention, executive function, language processing and working and declarative memory, whereas the DZ High-Risk twins presented with significantly lower scores only on language processing and episodic memory. CONCLUSIONS: The hypothesis that discrete cognitive impairment is present before the onset of the affective disorder and is genetically transmitted was supported. Thus, cognitive function may be a candidate endophenotype for affective disorders.
PubMed ID
16734950 View in PubMed
Less detail

Consistency and change in patterns of social drinking: a 6-year follow-up of the Finnish Twin Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224022
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1992 Apr;16(2):234-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1992
Author
J. Kaprio
R. Viken
M. Koskenvuo
K. Romanov
R J Rose
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1992 Apr;16(2):234-40
Date
Apr-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - genetics - psychology
Alcoholism - genetics - psychology
Cohort Studies
Diseases in Twins - genetics - psychology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Individuality
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Models, Genetic
Phenotype
Risk factors
Social Environment
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics - psychology
Abstract
In 1975 and again in 1981, all adult twins in the population-based Finnish Twin Cohort were administered postal questionnaires yielding data on self-reported frequency and quantity of alcohol use. The longitudinal results provide information on the age-to-age stability of social drinking patterns among 13,404 (twin) individuals aged 18 to 43 at baseline; model-fitting the cross-temporal consistency of the twins' reported alcohol use yields unique estimates of the contribution of genetic and environmental factors to their individual age-to-age stabilities. Mean consumption levels did not change between 1975 and 1981. Patterns of social drinking were more stable in older (aged 24-43 at baseline) than younger (aged 18-23 at baseline) adult twins, and were more stable among men than women. Heritabilities were significant at both baseline and follow-up for all three alcohol measures in both genders and both age groups, with a median magnitude of 0.48. Both longitudinal genetic and environmental covariances were significant, and both were generally higher among older pairs. Genetic covariances (median magnitude = 0.68) were significantly higher than environmental covariances (median = 0.36). Analyses of absolute changes in alcohol use revealed heritable influences on the disposition to change. We conclude that genes contribute to both consistency and change in patterns of alcohol use from early to midadulthood.
PubMed ID
1590545 View in PubMed
Less detail

Depressive symptoms and career-related goal appraisals: genetic and environmental correlations and interactions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259460
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2014 Aug;17(4):236-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Katariina Salmela-Aro
Sanna Read
Eero Vuoksimaa
Tellervo Korhonen
Danielle M Dick
Jaakko Kaprio
Richard J Rose
Source
Twin Res Hum Genet. 2014 Aug;17(4):236-43
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Depression - genetics - psychology
Diseases in Twins
Emotions
Female
Finland
Gene-Environment Interaction
Goals
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological
Twins - genetics - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
In order to further understand why depressive symptoms are associated with negative goal appraisals, the present study examined the genetic and environmental correlations and interactions between depressive symptoms and career-related goal appraisals. A total of 1,240 Finnish twins aged 21-26 years completed a questionnaire containing items on the appraisal of their career goals along five dimensions: importance, progress, effort, strain, and self-efficacy. In the same questionnaire, the 10-item General Behavior Inventory assessed depressive symptoms. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate the genetic and environmental correlations and gene-environment interactions between the career-goal appraisals and depressive symptoms. Associations were identified, and were attributed to environmental factors. Of the career-related goal appraisals, the shared environmental component was of a higher magnitude for the dimension of strain among the depressed compared with non-depressed subjects. The results indicate that the interplay between depressive symptoms and negative career-related goal appraisals is significantly affected by environmental factors, and thus possibly susceptible to targeted interventions.
PubMed ID
24932581 View in PubMed
Less detail

A developmental twin study of symptoms of anxiety and depression: evidence for genetic innovation and attenuation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92899
Source
Psychol Med. 2008 Nov;38(11):1567-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Kendler K S
Gardner C O
Lichtenstein P.
Author Affiliation
Virginia Institute of Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Medical College of Virginia/Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA. kendler@vcu.edu
Source
Psychol Med. 2008 Nov;38(11):1567-75
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - genetics - psychology
Child
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - genetics - psychology
Diseases in Twins - diagnosis - genetics - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Personality Assessment
Personality Inventory
Risk factors
Social Environment
Sweden
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Little is known about the pattern of genetic and environmental influences on symptoms of anxiety and depression (SxAnxDep) from childhood to early adulthood.MethodParental- and self-reported levels of SxAnxDep were assessed at ages 8-9, 13-14, 16-17 and 19-20 years in 2508 twins from the Swedish Twin Study of Child and Adolescent Development (TCHAD). Analysis conducted using the Mx program included SxAnxDep by parental and self-report. RESULTS: The best-fit model revealed one genetic risk factor for SxAnxDep acting at ages 8-9, 13-14, 16-17 and 19-20, and new sets of genetic risk factors 'coming on line' in early adolescence, late adolescence and early adulthood. Together, these genetic factors were very strong influences on the levels of SxAnxDep reported in common by parents and twins with heritability estimates, correcting for rater- and time-specific effects, ranging from 72% to 89%. The first genetic factor, which accounted for 72% of the variance in SxAnxDep at ages 8-9, attenuated sharply in influence, accounting for only 12% of the variance by ages 19-20. No evidence was found for shared environmental influences. Although not statistically significant, the correlation between genetic risk factors for SxAnxDep in males and females declined with advancing age. CONCLUSIONS: Genetic effects on SxAnxDep are developmentally dynamic from middle childhood to young adulthood, demonstrating both genetic innovation and genetic attenuation. The attenuation might explain the low levels of continuity observed for anxiety and depressive disorders from childhood to adulthood. Differences in genetic risk factors for SxAnxDep in males and females may increase during development.
PubMed ID
18578897 View in PubMed
Less detail

Diagnostic and genetic overlap of three common mental disorders in structured interviews and health registries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294717
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2018 Jan; 137(1):54-64
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Date
Jan-2018
Author
F A Torvik
E Ystrom
K Gustavson
T H Rosenström
J G Bramness
N Gillespie
S H Aggen
K S Kendler
T Reichborn-Kjennerud
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Disorders, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2018 Jan; 137(1):54-64
Date
Jan-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Twin Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Logistic Models
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Registries
Twins - genetics - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate whether diagnostic data from structured interviews, primary care and specialist care registries on major depressive disorder (MDD), anxiety disorders (AD) and alcohol use disorder (AUD) identify the same individuals, yield comparable comorbidity estimates and reflect the same genetic influences.
Registry data from primary and specialist care were available for 11 727 twins and diagnostic interview data for 2271 of these. We used logistic regression analyses and biometric modelling to investigate the overlap between the data sources.
Most individuals meeting diagnostic criteria at interview were not registered with a corresponding diagnosis. The rates of registration were higher for MDD (36% in primary care and 15% in specialist care) and AD (21% and 18%) than for AUD (3% and 7%). Comorbidity estimated as odds ratios, but not as polychoric correlations, was higher in the registries than in the interviews. Genetic influences on the disorders were highly correlated across data sources (median r = 0.81), bordering unity for MDD and AD.
Prevalence and comorbidity estimates differ between registries and population-based assessment. Nevertheless, diagnoses from health registries reflect the same genetic influences as common mental disorders assessed in the general population, indicating generalizability of aetiological factors across data sources.
PubMed ID
29072781 View in PubMed
Less detail

64 records – page 1 of 7.