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1991 Volvo Award in clinical sciences. Smoking and lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration: an MRI study of identical twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65039
Source
Spine. 1991 Sep;16(9):1015-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1991
Author
M C Battié
T. Videman
K. Gill
G B Moneta
R. Nyman
J. Kaprio
M. Koskenvuo
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopaedics, University of Washington, Seattle.
Source
Spine. 1991 Sep;16(9):1015-21
Date
Sep-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Awards and Prizes
Comparative Study
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Intervertebral Disk Displacement - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Lumbar Vertebrae - pathology
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
The primary objective of this study was to determine whether disc degeneration, as assessed through magnetic resonance imaging, is greater in smokers than in nonsmokers. To control for the maximum number of potentially confounding variables, pairs of identical twins highly discordant for cigarette smoking were selected as study subjects. Data analyses revealed 18% greater mean disc degeneration scores in the lumbar spines of smokers as compared with nonsmokers. The effect was present across the entire lumbar spine, implicating a mechanism acting systemically. This investigation demonstrates the efficiency of using carefully selected controls in studying conditions of multifactorial etiology, such as disc degeneration.
PubMed ID
1948392 View in PubMed
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Accounting for the relationship between low education and dementia: a twin study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84775
Source
Physiol Behav. 2007 Sep 10;92(1-2):232-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-10-2007
Author
Gatz Margaret
Mortimer James A
Fratiglioni Laura
Johansson Boo
Berg Stig
Andel Ross
Crowe Michael
Fiske Amy
Reynolds Chandra A
Pedersen Nancy L
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Box 281, S-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Physiol Behav. 2007 Sep 10;92(1-2):232-7
Date
Sep-10-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Apolipoprotein E4 - genetics - metabolism
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Dementia - genetics - metabolism
Diseases in Twins
Educational Status
Environment
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Models, Statistical
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
We evaluated whether the association between low education and greater risk of dementia is explained by genetic influences, using three different types of analyses. The HARMONY study (Swedish for "health" (Hälsa), "genes" (ARv), "environment" (Miljö), "and" (Och), and "new" (NY)) includes members of the Swedish Twin Registry who were aged 65 and older and alive in 1998, and who were screened and clinically assessed for dementia. There were 394 cases with dementia and 7786 unrelated controls. Analyses included co-twin control, tests for association between education and a measured genotype, and bivariate twin modeling. Low education was a significant risk factor for dementia both in case-control analyses (odds ratio=1.77, 95% confidence interval 1.38 to 2.28) and co-twin control analyses with monozygotic twin pairs (odds ratio=3.17, 95% confidence interval 1.26 to 7.93). Apolipoprotein E genotype was not associated with education and did not account for the relationship between education and dementia. Bivariate twin modeling showed that the association between education and dementia was not mediated by genetic influences in common between education and dementia. The association was mediated by shared environmental influences that were related to both dementia and to education. Low education is confirmed as a risk factor for dementia. Findings from three different analytic approaches showed that genetic influences did not explain this association.
PubMed ID
17597169 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acquired liver fat is a key determinant of serum lipid alterations in healthy monozygotic twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113714
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Sep;21(9):1815-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
S M Kaye
M. Maranghi
L H Bogl
J. Kaprio
A. Hakkarainen
J. Lundbom
N. Lundbom
A. Rissanen
M R Taskinen
K H Pietiläinen
Author Affiliation
Obesity Research Unit, Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Helsinki University Central Hospital and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2013 Sep;21(9):1815-22
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat
Adult
Apolipoproteins B - blood
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Exercise
Fatty Liver - blood - complications - genetics - metabolism
Female
Finland
Humans
Liver - metabolism
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity - blood - complications - genetics - metabolism
Subcutaneous Fat
Twins, Monozygotic
Young Adult
Abstract
The effects of acquired obesity on lipid profile and lipoprotein composition in rare BMI-discordant monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs were studied.
Abdominal fat distribution, liver fat (magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy), fasting serum lipid profile (ultracentrifugation, gradient gel-electrophoresis, and colorimetric enzymatic methods), and lifestyle factors (questionnaires and diaries) were assessed in 15 BMI-discordant (within-pair difference [?] in BMI >3 kg/m2) and nin concordant (?BMI
PubMed ID
23696329 View in PubMed
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Acquired obesity is associated with changes in the serum lipidomic profile independent of genetic effects--a monozygotic twin study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165168
Source
PLoS One. 2007;2(2):e218
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Kirsi H Pietiläinen
Marko Sysi-Aho
Aila Rissanen
Tuulikki Seppänen-Laakso
Hannele Yki-Järvinen
Jaakko Kaprio
Matej Oresic
Author Affiliation
Obesity Research Unit, Department of Psychiatry, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
PLoS One. 2007;2(2):e218
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat - pathology
Adult
Body Composition
Body mass index
Diet Records
Female
Finland
Humans
Insulin Resistance
Lipids - blood
Lysophosphatidylcholines - blood
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Metabolomics
Obesity - blood - epidemiology - genetics - pathology
Smoking - epidemiology
Sphingomyelins - blood
Subcutaneous Fat - pathology
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
Both genetic and environmental factors are involved in the etiology of obesity and the associated lipid disturbances. We determined whether acquired obesity is associated with changes in global serum lipid profiles independent of genetic factors in young adult monozygotic (MZ) twins. 14 healthy MZ pairs discordant for obesity (10 to 25 kg weight difference) and ten weight concordant control pairs aged 24-27 years were identified from a large population-based study. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the euglycemic clamp technique, and body composition by DEXA (% body fat) and by MRI (subcutaneous and intra-abdominal fat). Global characterization of lipid molecular species in serum was performed by a lipidomics strategy using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Obesity, independent of genetic influences, was primarily related to increases in lysophosphatidylcholines, lipids found in proinflammatory and proatherogenic conditions and to decreases in ether phospholipids, which are known to have antioxidant properties. These lipid changes were associated with insulin resistance, a pathogonomic characteristic of acquired obesity in these young adult twins. Our results show that obesity, already in its early stages and independent of genetic influences, is associated with deleterious alterations in the lipid metabolism known to facilitate atherogenesis, inflammation and insulin resistance.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17299598 View in PubMed
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Acquired preference especially for dietary fat and obesity: a study of weight-discordant monozygotic twin pairs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189641
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002 Jul;26(7):973-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2002
Author
A. Rissanen
P. Hakala
L. Lissner
C-E Mattlar
M. Koskenvuo
T. Rönnemaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 2002 Jul;26(7):973-7
Date
Jul-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Weight
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Humans
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
To determine the independent associations of dietary preference for fat with obesity without the confounding by genetic effects.
Descriptive comparison of the responses of monozygotic twins discordant for obesity to questions concerning current and past preference for dietary fat, current overconsumption of fatty items and recalled food consumption compared to the co-twin.
The Research and Development Centre of the Social Insurance Institution, Finland.
Twenty-three healthy monozygotic twin pairs who were discordant for obesity (BMI difference at least 3 kg/m(2)).
Obesity status of the twin, as a function of the current and recalled dietary preferences and selected psychosocial variables.
The obese twins reported current preference for fatty foods three times more frequently than the lean co-twin. Moreover, when comparing recalled taste for fat at the time the twins left their parental homes, both the obese and lean co-twins consistently recalled that the obese twin had greater preference for fatty foods in young adulthood, and that the lean twin had less. Psychological characteristics of lean and obese co-twins did not differ.
Acquired preference for fatty foods is associated with obesity, independent of genetic background. Modification of fat preferences may be an important step in the prevention of obesity in the general population.
PubMed ID
12080452 View in PubMed
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Acute polyhydramnios in twin pregnancy. A retrospective study with special reference to therapeutic amniocentesis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59890
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1990;69(4):297-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
A. Rådestad
P A Thomassen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1990;69(4):297-300
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Amniocentesis - adverse effects - methods - standards
Diagnosis, Differential
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Polyhydramnios - epidemiology - therapy - ultrasonography
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy, Multiple
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Tocolysis
Twins, Monozygotic
Ultrasonography, Prenatal
Abstract
Acute polyhydramnios in monozygotic twin pregnancy causes severe maternal discomfort and carries a high risk of premature labor. During the years 1980 to 1987, 36 patients with this complication were delivered in Sweden, giving an incidence of 1/20,000 births, or 1/200 twin births. In 18 patients (group A) who were treated with one or more amniotic taps, the delivery was postponed by 2 weeks, as compared with one week in 18 conservatively treated patients (group B). The peri- and neonatal death rate was 47% in group A and 58% in group B. Our own experience is that amniotic taps are safe if the amniotic fluid is removed slowly under prophylactic tocolysis. It gives symptomatic relief to the mother and may postpone labor until the gestational age of the twins is more compatible with survival.
PubMed ID
2244460 View in PubMed
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ADHD, autism spectrum disorder, temperament, and character: phenotypical associations and etiology in a Swedish childhood twin study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112856
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 2013 Nov;54(8):1140-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Nóra Kerekes
Sven Brändström
Sebastian Lundström
Maria Råstam
Thomas Nilsson
Henrik Anckarsäter
Author Affiliation
Centre for Ethics, Law and Mental Health (CELAM), University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Swedish Prison and Probation Services, R&D Unit, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: nora.kerekes@neuro.gu.se.
Source
Compr Psychiatry. 2013 Nov;54(8):1140-7
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Character
Child
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology - genetics - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Personality - physiology
Phenotype
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Temperament - physiology
Twins, Dizygotic - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Twins, Monozygotic - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To explore the links between neurodevelopmental disorders - attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) - and personality in a population-based, genetically sensitive study of children.
A population-based sample of 1886 twins aged 9 and 12, enriched for childhood mental health problems, was recruited from the Child and Adolescent Twin Study in Sweden (CATSS). Parents were interviewed over the telephone using the Autism-Tics, AD/HD and other Comorbidities (A-TAC) inventory, and in a second step they rated their children according to the Junior Temperament and Character Inventory (JTCI).
ADHD was strongly correlated with novelty seeking, while ASD was correlated positively with harm avoidance and negatively with reward dependence. The strongest associations between personality traits and neurodevelopmental disorders were negative correlations between the character dimensions of self-directedness and cooperativeness and ADHD and ASD alike. Cross-twin cross-trait correlations between ADHD, ASD, and personality dimensions in monozygotic twins were more than double those in dizygotic twins, indicating a strong genetic effect behind the phenotypic covariation between neurodevelopmental disorders and personality.
Neurodevelopmental disorders are linked specifically to particular temperament profiles and generally to hampered development of the self-governing strategies referred to as "character." Poor self-agency and cooperation may be core functional outcomes in the separation of children with handicapping conditions from those with traits only reminiscent of neurodevelopmental disorders. The associations between neurodevelopmental disorders and personality are at least partly due to genetic effects influencing both conditions. As a consequence, personality must be broadly considered in neuropsychiatry, just as neuropsychiatric disorders and their genetic, neurodevelopmental, and cognitive susceptibilities have to be in personality research and clinical treatment.
PubMed ID
23790516 View in PubMed
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Adipocyte morphology and implications for metabolic derangements in acquired obesity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264941
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2014 Nov;38(11):1423-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
S. Heinonen
L. Saarinen
J. Naukkarinen
A. Rodríguez
G. Frühbeck
A. Hakkarainen
J. Lundbom
N. Lundbom
K. Vuolteenaho
E. Moilanen
P. Arner
S. Hautaniemi
A. Suomalainen
J. Kaprio
A. Rissanen
K H Pietiläinen
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2014 Nov;38(11):1423-31
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipocytes - metabolism
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Adult
Body mass index
Body Weight
Energy Metabolism
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gene Expression
Gene-Environment Interaction
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Metabolome
Obesity - complications - genetics - metabolism
Twins, Monozygotic
Abstract
Adipocyte size and number have been suggested to predict the development of metabolic complications in obesity. However, the genetic and environmental determinants behind this phenomenon remain unclear.
We studied this question in rare-weight discordant (intra-pair difference (?) body mass index (BMI) 3-10 kg m(-2), n=15) and concordant (?BMI 0-2 kg m(-)(2), n=5) young adult (22-35 years) monozygotic twin pairs identified from 10 birth cohorts of Finnish twins (n=5 500 pairs). Subcutaneous abdominal adipocyte size from surgical biopsies was measured under a light microscope. Adipocyte number was calculated from cell size and total body fat (D ? A).
The concordant pairs were remarkably similar for adipocyte size and number (intra-class correlations 0.91-0.92, P
PubMed ID
24549139 View in PubMed
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Adiponectin concentration and insulin indicators following overfeeding in identical twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87040
Source
J Endocrinol Invest. 2008 Feb;31(2):132-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2008
Author
Ukkola O.
Terán-García M.
Tremblay A.
Després J-P
Bouchard C.
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine and Biocenter Oulu, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Endocrinol Invest. 2008 Feb;31(2):132-7
Date
Feb-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiponectin - blood
Adult
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Humans
Insulin - blood - metabolism
Insulin Resistance
Leptin - blood
Male
Overnutrition - blood - metabolism
Twins, Monozygotic - blood - metabolism
Abstract
Low adiponectin levels have been associated with high body mass index, low insulin sensitivity, and diabetes. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationships between changes in serum adiponectin concentration and adiposity, glucose, and insulin in response to long-term overfeeding in identical twins and to calculate the twin resemblance in serum adiponectin concentrations. SUBJECTS AND DESIGN: Twenty-four sedentary young men [mean (+/-SD) age, 21+/-2 yr] who constituted 12 pairs of healthy identical twins were studied for metabolic and adiponectin changes in response to overfeeding. INTERVENTION: Subjects were overfed by 84,000 kcal over a 100-day period. OUTCOME MEASURES: The overfeeding study provides an opportunity to examine the relationships between adiponectin and changes in body weight, adiposity, plasma glucose and insulin. RESULTS: Serum adiponectin concentration correlated positively with body weight (r= 0.41, p=0.05) at baseline but not with indicators of adiposity or with visceral fat. No relationship existed between baseline adiponectin concentration and body weight or adiposity gains with overfeeding. However, serum adiponectin decreased significantly by -2.35+/-0.48 microg/ml (p=0.001) in response to overfeeding. Baseline adiponectin levels correlated negatively with changes in plasma fasting glucose levels (r=-0.53, p=0.01) and homeostasis model assessment index (r=-0.41, p=0.05), independently of fat mass. The intrapair coefficient for twin resemblance (r=0.75, p=0.001) strongly suggests that baseline serum adiponectin concentration is a familial trait. CONCLUSIONS: These data provide evidence that adiponectin concentration is a familial trait in normal-weight individuals, that it decreases when challenged by positive energy balance, and that its overfeeding-induced variations are correlated with glucose and insulin levels.
PubMed ID
18362504 View in PubMed
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Adolescent alcohol abuse and adverse adult outcomes: evaluating confounds with drinking-discordant twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262747
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2014 Aug;38(8):2314-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Richard J Rose
Torsten Winter
Richard J Viken
Jaakko Kaprio
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2014 Aug;38(8):2314-21
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adult
Alcoholism - genetics - psychology
Diseases in Twins - genetics - psychology
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Income
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Sexual Behavior - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Twins, Dizygotic - psychology
Twins, Monozygotic - psychology
Abstract
Adolescent alcohol abuse is associated with adverse outcomes in early adulthood, but differences in familial status and structure and household and community environments correlate with both adolescent drinking and adverse adult outcomes and may explain their association. We studied drinking-discordant twin pairs to evaluate such confounds to ask: Will between-family associations replicate in within-family comparisons?
With longitudinal data from >3,000 Finnish twins, we associated drinking problems at age 18½ with 13 outcomes assessed at age 25; included were sustained substance abuse, poor health, physical symptoms, early coital debut, multiple sexual partners, life dissatisfaction, truncated education, and financial problems. We assessed associations among twins as individuals with linear regression adjusted for correlated observations; within-family analyses of discordant twin pairs followed, comparing paired means for adult outcomes among co-twins discordant for adolescent problem drinking. Defining discordance by extreme scores on self-reported problem drinking at age 18½ permitted parallel analyses of twins as individuals and discordant twin pairs. Alternate definitions of pair-wise discordance and difference score correlations across the entire twin sample yielded supplementary analyses.
All individual associations were highly significant for all definitions of discordance we employed. Depending on definitions of discordance, 11 to 13 comparisons of all drinking-discordant twin pairs and 3 to 6 comparisons of discordant monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs replicated between-family associations. For most outcomes, effect size attenuated from individual-level analysis to that within discordant MZ twin pairs providing evidence of partial confounding in associations reported in earlier research. The exception was the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ); at age 25, GHQ-12 had equivalent associations with age 18½ Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index across all comparisons.
Our analyses control for shared family background, and, partly or fully, for shared genes, to yield within-family replications and more compelling evidence than previously available that adolescent alcohol abuse disrupts transitions into early adulthood.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25040879 View in PubMed
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