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103 records – page 2 of 11.

Cardiovascular disease risk factors among five major ethnic groups in Oslo, Norway: the Oslo Immigrant Health Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80982
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2006 Jun;13(3):348-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Glenday Kathleen
Kumar Bernadette N
Tverdal Aage
Meyer Haakon E
Author Affiliation
Institute of General Practice and Community Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. kglenday@nchecr.unsw.edu.au
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2006 Jun;13(3):348-55
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cardiovascular Diseases - ethnology
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Hypertension - ethnology
Iran - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pakistan - ethnology
Risk factors
Sri Lanka - ethnology
Turkey - ethnology
Vietnam - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The levels of cardiovascular risk factors vary in different segments of a population. Our aim was to investigate ethnic differences in cardiovascular risk factors among five major immigrant groups in Oslo, Norway. DESIGN: A population-based, cross-sectional study. METHODS: The Oslo Immigrant Health study was conducted in 2002. All first-generation immigrants aged 31-60 years living in Oslo from Sri Lanka, Turkey, Iran, Vietnam, and a random sample of 30% of those from Pakistan, were invited. A total of 3019 individuals provided written consent and met the inclusion criteria. Participants had a clinical examination, blood test, and were asked to complete the study questionnaire. RESULTS: Immigrants from Vietnam had the highest high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, whereas immigrants from Sri Lanka and Pakistan, and men from Turkey, had the lowest HDL-cholesterol and highest triglycerides. Immigrants from Sri Lanka, Pakistan and Turkey had the highest blood pressure. Smoking was least prevalent among Sri Lankan immigrants and most common among Turkish immigrants. Ethnic differences in blood pressure and HDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides among women, were attenuated after adjusting for obesity measures. A moderate and higher (> or =10%) Framingham risk score was most common among Turkish and Pakistani immigrants. CONCLUSIONS: We found ethnic differences in triglycerides, HDL-cholesterol and blood pressure; however, the differences in blood pressure were surprisingly small. Ethnic differences were partly explained by obesity. The prevalence of smoking also varied greatly between the different ethnic groups.
PubMed ID
16926663 View in PubMed
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[Caries in 2-3 year old children in relation to feeding habits and nationality]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36834
Source
Tandlaegernes Tidsskr. 1992 Feb;(2):44-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
L A Nielsen
L. Esmark
Author Affiliation
Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet, Københavns Universitet.
Source
Tandlaegernes Tidsskr. 1992 Feb;(2):44-9
Date
Feb-1992
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Dental Caries - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Diet, Cariogenic
Feeding Behavior
Humans
Infant
Morocco - ethnology
Pakistan - ethnology
Turkey - ethnology
Yugoslavia - ethnology
PubMed ID
1449738 View in PubMed
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Caries prevalence of kindergarten children in Salzgitter and Oslo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36858
Source
Caries Res. 1992;26(3):201-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
A B Sönju Clasen
F R von der Fehr
J M Kant van Daal
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Dental Health, Salzgitter, FRG.
Source
Caries Res. 1992;26(3):201-4
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
DMF Index
Dental Caries - epidemiology - pathology - therapy
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Molar - pathology
Norway - epidemiology
Poland - ethnology
Prevalence
Tooth, Deciduous - pathology
Turkey - ethnology
Abstract
In a comparable epidemiological study of kindergarten children, 455 4- and 5-year-olds in Salzgitter (FRG) and 171 4- and 5-year-olds in Oslo (Norway) were examined. Caries was scored at the cavitation level according to WHO criteria. The percentage of caries-free children was higher and the dmfs scores were lower in Oslo than in Salzgitter. It is postulated that this was the result of different levels of fluoride exposure, nutritional habits and dental treatment provision.
PubMed ID
1628295 View in PubMed
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Changes in food habits and nutritional status of immigrants from Turkey in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62240
Source
Bibl Nutr Dieta. 1990;(45):157-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
T. Koctürk-Runefors
Source
Bibl Nutr Dieta. 1990;(45):157-64
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Emigration and Immigration
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Nutritional Status
Sweden
Turkey - ethnology
PubMed ID
2383236 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characteristics of relevance for health in Turkish and Middle Eastern adolescent immigrants compared to Finnish immigrants and ethnic Swedish teenagers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90677
Source
Turk J Pediatr. 2008 Sep-Oct;50(5):418-25
Publication Type
Article
Author
Holmberg Lars I
Hellberg Dan
Author Affiliation
Child Health Unit, Falun Hospital, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun, Sweden.
Source
Turk J Pediatr. 2008 Sep-Oct;50(5):418-25
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Finland - ethnology
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle East - ethnology
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk-Taking
Sweden - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
Urban Population
Abstract
Our objective was to compare sociodemographic conditions and risky/health behaviors affecting Turkish or Middle Eastern versus ethnic Swedes and Finnish immigrant adolescents, respectively. All eligible adolescents 13-18 years old (3,216 pupils) in a medium-sized town in Sweden completed a validated in-depth questionnaire (Q90), with 165 questions. One hundred and one adolescents were Turkish or Middle Eastern immigrants, while 73 were immigrants from Finland, a neighboring country to Sweden. Turkish/Middle Eastern immigrants were more likely to attend a theoretical program in school, were rarely bullied, as compared to ethnic Swedes and Finns. Turkish/Middle Eastern girls used alcohol at a lower frequency, and reported less depression and sexual experiences than ethnic Swedish girls and Finns. A higher frequency of Finnish adolescents had been bullied and had vandalized, and Finnish adolescents were also determined to have used tobacco and cannabis and to be heavy drinkers more frequently than boys from Turkey/the Middle East. We concluded that adolescent immigrants from Turkey and the Middle East seem to be well adapted to Sweden and also have ambitions for a higher education. Differences in risky behaviors were particularly pronounced in comparisons with immigrants from Finland for both boys and girls.
PubMed ID
19102044 View in PubMed
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Characterization of PRF1, STX11 and UNC13D genotype-phenotype correlations in familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92457
Source
Br J Haematol. 2008 Sep;143(1):75-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Horne AnnaCarin
Ramme Kim Göransdotter
Rudd Eva
Zheng Chengyun
Wali Yasser
al-Lamki Zakia
Gürgey Aytemiz
Yalman Nevin
Nordenskjöld Magnus
Henter Jan-Inge
Author Affiliation
Childhood Cancer Research Unit, Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Br J Haematol. 2008 Sep;143(1):75-83
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Genotype
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic - cerebrospinal fluid - ethnology - genetics
Male
Membrane Proteins - genetics
Mutation
Odds Ratio
Oman - ethnology
Phenotype
Pore Forming Cytotoxic Proteins - genetics
Qa-SNARE Proteins - genetics
Risk Assessment - methods
Sweden - ethnology
Turkey - ethnology
Abstract
Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) is a rare autosomal recessive lethal condition characterized by fever, cytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly and hemophagocytosis. The hallmark of FHL is defect apoptosis triggering and lymphocyte cellular cytotoxicity. Thus far three disease-causing genes (PRF1, UNC13D, STX11) have been identified. We performed a genotype-phenotype study in a large, multi-ethnic cohort of 76 FHL patients originating from 65 unrelated families. Biallelic mutations in PRF1, UNC13D and STX11 were demonstrated in 13/74 (18%), 6/61 (10%) and 14/70 (20%) patients, respectively. In 27/60 (45%) patients analyzed for all three genes, no molecular diagnosis was established. STX11 mutations were most common in Turkish families (7/28, 25%), whereas in Middle East families, PRF1 mutations were most frequent (6/13, 46%). No biallelic mutation was identified in most families of Nordic origin (13/14, 93%). Patients carrying PRF1 mutations had higher risk of early onset (age
PubMed ID
18710388 View in PubMed
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[Child health care among Turkish immigrants--an attempt to bridge cultural cleavages]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41665
Source
Nord Med. 1978 Jun;93(5-6):126-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1978

[Child health center in Rosengård: refugees are our best patients. Interview by Tord Ajanki.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38031
Source
Vardfacket. 1989 Sep 28;13(16):20-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-28-1989
Author
M. Nilsson
Source
Vardfacket. 1989 Sep 28;13(16):20-1
Date
Sep-28-1989
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Culture
Humans
Infant
Refugees
Sweden
Turkey - ethnology
PubMed ID
2603523 View in PubMed
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Childhood tuberculosis in a developed country.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37991
Source
Eur Respir J. 1989 Nov;2(10):985-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1989
Author
J. Mortensen
P. Lange
H K Storm
K. Viskum
Author Affiliation
Dept of Pulmonary Medicine, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1989 Nov;2(10):985-7
Date
Nov-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
Incidence
Morocco - ethnology
Pakistan - ethnology
Philippines - ethnology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
From 1975 to 1985, 25 Danish children (aged less than 15 yrs) and 40 children of immigrants were notified for tuberculosis in Copenhagen for the first time. A follow-up was undertaken in 1987. The annual rate of tuberculosis per 100,000 among the Danish children was 5 and among immigrant children 68-200 depending on the nationality. At the time of diagnosis, no significant differences were present between Danes and immigrants as regards age, sex, occurrence of symptoms or previous BCG immunization, whereas there were significantly more bacteriologically proven cases among the immigrants. All Danish children had respiratory tuberculosis only, whereas 13 immigrant children had extrapulmonary manifestations including one case of miliary and two cases of meningeal tuberculosis. At follow-up, all patients were cured for tuberculosis and had experienced a normal physical development.
PubMed ID
2606201 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Children born to immigrant workers in Denmark in 1972 and 1973. Demographic conditions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42257
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1976 Jun 21;138(26):1595-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-21-1976

103 records – page 2 of 11.