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Adolescents with Turkish background in Norway and Sweden: a comparative study of their psychological adaptation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71103
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2004 Feb;45(1):15-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Erkki Virta
David L Sam
Charles Westin
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research in International Migration and Ethnic Relations, Stockholm University, Sweden. erkki.virta@ceifo.su.se
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2004 Feb;45(1):15-25
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - ethnology - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Sweden - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
Abstract
Using a questionnaire survey, this study compared psychological adaptation (self-esteem, life satisfaction, and mental health problems) of Turkish adolescents in Norway and Sweden, and examined to what extent ethnic and majority identities, acculturation strategies, and perceived discrimination accounted for adaptation among Turkish adolescents. The samples consisted of 407 Turks (111 in Norway and 296 in Sweden) with a mean age of 15.2 years and 433 host adolescents (207 in Norway, 226 in Sweden) with a mean age of 15.6 years. Turks in Norway reported poorer psychological adaptation than Turks in Sweden. Predictors of good adaptation were Turkish identity and integration, whereas poor adaptation was related to marginalization and perceived discrimination. The results indicated that the poorer adaptation of Turks in Norway compared to that of Turks in Sweden could be due to lower degree of Turkish identity and higher degree of perceived discrimination.
PubMed ID
15016275 View in PubMed
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Antioxidant intake, oxidative stress and inflammation among immigrant women from the Middle East living in Sweden: associations with cardiovascular risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84865
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2007 Dec;17(10):748-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Daryani Achraf
Basu Samar
Becker Wulf
Larsson Anders
Risérus Ulf
Author Affiliation
Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala Science Park, 751 85 Uppsala, Sweden. achraf.daryani@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis. 2007 Dec;17(10):748-56
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Blood Pressure - physiology
C-Reactive Protein - analysis
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Emigration and Immigration
F2-Isoprostanes - blood
Female
Food Habits - ethnology
Humans
Inflammation - blood - epidemiology
Iran - ethnology
Middle Aged
Oxidative Stress
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Immigrant women from the Middle East have higher cardiovascular risk compared to native women. Whether low antioxidant intake, oxidative stress or inflammation contributes to risk is unknown. In a cross-sectional study of 157 randomly selected foreign-born women (Iranian and Turkish) and native women living in Sweden, we investigated antioxidant status, oxidative stress (F(2)-isoprostanes) and systemic inflammation (plasma high sensitive C-reactive protein; CRP) markers. We also investigated relationships between F(2)-isoprostanes, CRP and cardiovascular risk factors. METHODS AND RESULT: Dietary intake was assessed using 24-h dietary recalls repeated four times. Micronutrient intake was not consistently different between groups. Serum alpha-tocopherol, but not gamma-tocopherol levels, was lower in Turkish vs. Swedish women (P0.21, P values
PubMed ID
17145175 View in PubMed
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Cancer risks in childhood and adolescence among the offspring of immigrants to Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19153
Source
Br J Cancer. 2002 May 6;86(9):1414-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-6-2002
Author
Kari Hemminki
X. Li
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, 141 57 Huddinge, Sweden. kari.hemminki@cnt.ki.se
Source
Br J Cancer. 2002 May 6;86(9):1414-8
Date
May-6-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asia - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual
Emigration and Immigration
Epidemiologic Studies
Europe - ethnology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Leukemia - epidemiology - ethnology
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology - ethnology
Male
Nervous System Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
United States - ethnology
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
We used the nation-wide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to analyse the risk of nervous system tumours, leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in age groups 0-4 and 0-19 years among Swedish-born offspring of immigrants. The study included 850 000 individuals with an immigrant background, including European, Asian and American parents. We calculated standardised incidence ratios for the above three malignancies using Swedish offspring as a reference. Subjects were grouped by region or by selected countries of parental origin. No group differed significantly from Swedes in the occurrence of nervous system neoplasm or leukaemia. Offspring of Yugoslav fathers (SIR 2.27) and Turkish parents were at increased risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The highest risk was noted for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among young offspring (0-4 years) of two Turkish parents (6.87). The currently available limited data on rates for childhood non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in these countries do not explain the risk in the offspring of immigrants. Yugoslavs and Turks are recent immigrant groups to Sweden, and their offspring have been subject to much population mixing, perhaps leading to recurring infections and immunological stimulation, which may contribute to their excess of lymphomas.
PubMed ID
11986773 View in PubMed
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Cancer risks in first-generation immigrants to Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19166
Source
Int J Cancer. 2002 May 10;99(2):218-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-2002
Author
Kari Hemminki
Xinjun Li
Kamila Czene
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden. kari.hemminki@cnt.ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2002 May 10;99(2):218-28
Date
May-10-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa - ethnology
Asia - ethnology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Chile - ethnology
Databases
Denmark - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
Endometrial Neoplasms - epidemiology
Europe - ethnology
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Netherlands - ethnology
North America - ethnology
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Romania - ethnology
Sex Characteristics
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
We used the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to analyse cancer risks in 613,000 adult immigrants to Sweden. All the immigrants had become parents in Sweden and their median age at immigration was 24 years for men and 22 years for women. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for 18 cancer sites using native Swedes as a reference. Data were also available from compatriot marriages. All cancer was decreased by 5% and 8% for immigrant men and women, respectively. However, most of the male increase was due to lung cancer for which male immigrants showed a 41% excess. Among individual cancer sites and immigrant countries, 110 comparisons were significant, 62 showing protection and 48 an increased risk. Most of the differences between the rates in immigrants and Swedes could be ascribed to the variation of cancer incidence in the indigenous populations. Some high immigrant SIRs were 5.05 (n = 6, 95% CI 1.82-11.06) for stomach cancer in Rumanian women and 2.41 (41, 1.73-3.27) for lung cancer in Dutch men. At some sites, such as testis, prostate, skin (melanoma), kidney, cervix and nervous system, the SIRs for immigrants were decreased; in some groups of immigrants SIRs were about 0.20. The highest rates for testicular cancer were noted for Danes and Chileans. Women from Yugoslavia and Turkey had an excess of thyroid tumours. All immigrant groups showed breast, endometrial and ovarian cancers at or below the Swedish level but the differences were no more than 2-fold.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Cancer. 2002 Sep 20;101(3):298; author reply 29912209983
PubMed ID
11979437 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of relevance for health in Turkish and Middle Eastern adolescent immigrants compared to Finnish immigrants and ethnic Swedish teenagers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90677
Source
Turk J Pediatr. 2008 Sep-Oct;50(5):418-25
Publication Type
Article
Author
Holmberg Lars I
Hellberg Dan
Author Affiliation
Child Health Unit, Falun Hospital, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun, Sweden.
Source
Turk J Pediatr. 2008 Sep-Oct;50(5):418-25
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Finland - ethnology
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle East - ethnology
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk-Taking
Sweden - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
Urban Population
Abstract
Our objective was to compare sociodemographic conditions and risky/health behaviors affecting Turkish or Middle Eastern versus ethnic Swedes and Finnish immigrant adolescents, respectively. All eligible adolescents 13-18 years old (3,216 pupils) in a medium-sized town in Sweden completed a validated in-depth questionnaire (Q90), with 165 questions. One hundred and one adolescents were Turkish or Middle Eastern immigrants, while 73 were immigrants from Finland, a neighboring country to Sweden. Turkish/Middle Eastern immigrants were more likely to attend a theoretical program in school, were rarely bullied, as compared to ethnic Swedes and Finns. Turkish/Middle Eastern girls used alcohol at a lower frequency, and reported less depression and sexual experiences than ethnic Swedish girls and Finns. A higher frequency of Finnish adolescents had been bullied and had vandalized, and Finnish adolescents were also determined to have used tobacco and cannabis and to be heavy drinkers more frequently than boys from Turkey/the Middle East. We concluded that adolescent immigrants from Turkey and the Middle East seem to be well adapted to Sweden and also have ambitions for a higher education. Differences in risky behaviors were particularly pronounced in comparisons with immigrants from Finland for both boys and girls.
PubMed ID
19102044 View in PubMed
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Contested etiology: cancer risk among two Anatolian populations in Turkey and Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17316
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2004 Sep;28(3):315-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Iman Roushdy-Hammady
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27704, USA. imanroushdy@yahoo.com
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2004 Sep;28(3):315-39
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Carcinogens, Environmental - adverse effects
Cultural Characteristics
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mesothelioma - chemically induced - ethnology
Narration
Neoplasms - chemically induced
Physician-Patient Relations
Pleural Neoplasms - chemically induced - ethnology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Rural Population
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Turkey - ethnology
Zeolites - adverse effects
Abstract
This paper discusses the different explanatory models and the contested perceptions of cancer etiology among residents of two Anatolian villages and migrants from these villages in Turkey, Sweden, and Germany. These communities suffer from an endemic, deadly cancer called mesothelioma, the cause of which is associated with exposure to an environmental carcinogenic substance, erionite, which is present in large deposits in the ground, in the stones, and white stucco that the villagers used to build their homes, and in the air in the form of dust. However, an examination of patients' disease trends, experiences, and local explanations has led to new investigations of possible familial risk cofactors. This paper selectively focuses on different aspects of cancer risk and its manifested metaphors, aesthetics, and perceptions. The different categories of cancer risk freely interact, derive an important part of their meaning from the context of the doctor-cancer patient relationship, and are created and navigated by the cancer narrative.
PubMed ID
15600116 View in PubMed
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Dental health and access to dental care for ethnic minorities in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32729
Source
Ethn Health. 2000 Feb;5(1):23-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
A. Hjern
M. Grindefjord
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Huddinge University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden. anders.hjern@sos.se
Source
Ethn Health. 2000 Feb;5(1):23-32
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chile - ethnology
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Emigration and Immigration
Ethnic Groups
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Iran - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups
Poland - ethnology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe access to dental care in a population-based sample of foreign-born Swedish residents in relation to dental health. DESIGN: The study was based on data from the Immigrant Survey of Living Conditions in four minority study groups consisting of a total of 1,898 Swedish residents born in Poland, Chile, Turkey and Iran aged 27-60. An age-matched study group of 2,477 Swedish-born residents from the Survey of Living Conditions of 1996 was added as a comparison group. The study also included 2,228 children aged 3-15 years in the minority households and 2,892 children in the households of the Swedish-born study group. RESULTS: The risk of poor dental health was higher in all four minority study groups than for the Swedish-born study group after adjusting for socio-economic variables. In the adult minority study groups the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for having prostheses and problems with chewing was 6.3 (4.3-9.1) and 2.7 (1.8-4.3), respectively, for the Polish-born, 4.8 (3.3-7.1) and 3.2 (2.1-4.9) for the Chilean-born, 4.6 (3.1-6.9) and 4.8 (3.6-7.2) for the Turkish-born, and 2.7 (1.5-4.8) and 6.5 (4.1-10.3) for the Iranian-born compared with the Swedish-born. In the child study group all four minority groups had an increased risk of caries ranging from OR 1.6 (1.3-2.1) in the Chilean group to 2.5 (2.0-3.0) in the Turkish group compared with the children with Swedish-born parents. The adults in all four minority study groups more often lacked regular treatment by a dentist than Swedish-born residents. The OR for not having been treated by a dentist during the 2 years preceding the interview ranged from 1.9 (1.4-2.6) in the Polish-born study group to 3.0 (2.3-4.0) in the Chilean-born study group after adjustment for socio-economic factors and general health. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that adults in minority populations in Sweden use less dental care despite having greater needs of dental treatment than the majority population. This inequity calls for action in health policy and preventive dental health programmes.
PubMed ID
10858936 View in PubMed
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Diabetes mellitus in Turkish immigrants in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47344
Source
Diabetes Metab. 2003 Sep;29(4 Pt 1):435-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
P E Wändell
K. Hjörleifsdottir Steiner
S E Johansson
Author Affiliation
Family Medicine Stockholm, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Per.Wandell@klinvet.ki.se
Source
Diabetes Metab. 2003 Sep;29(4 Pt 1):435-9
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Educational Status
Employment
Exercise
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sex Characteristics
Smoking
Sweden - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
Abstract
This study analyses the risk of self-reported diabetes mellitus among Turkish-born immigrants in Sweden. Two simple random samples were used: The Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare Immigrant Survey, and the Swedish Survey of Living Conditions, both from 1996. Totally 526 Turkish immigrants, 285 men and 241 women, were compared with 2854 Swedish controls, 1425 men and 1429 women, all in ages 27-60 years. Data were analysed by sex in an age-adjusted model, and a full model also included education, employment status, BMI and country of birth (logistic regression). Among Turkish men, age-adjusted diabetes prevalence was not higher than among Swedish men, odds ratio (OR) 1.04 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.35-3.11). Among Turkish women, age-adjusted diabetes prevalence was higher than among Swedish women, OR 3.22 (95% CI 1.36-7.64), but when also adjusting for educational level, employment status and BMI, OR was 1.22 (95% CI 0.41-3.66). We conclude, that age-adjusted presence of known diabetes was higher among Turkish-born women than among Swedish women, but was explained by lower employment rate, lower educational status and a higher level of overweight and obesity.
PubMed ID
14526274 View in PubMed
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Ethnicity, childhood environment and atopic disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15598
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2000 Apr;30(4):521-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
A. Hjern
B. Haglund
G. Hedlin
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Huddinge University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; Centre for Epidemiology, National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2000 Apr;30(4):521-8
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chile - ethnology
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - ethnology
Male
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) has demonstrated large differences in the prevalence of atopic disorders in children between different regions in the world. Populations with a higher standard of living and a more westernized lifestyle tend to have higher rates of atopy and asthma. Many hypotheses regarding environmental causes of atopic disorder focus on the early childhood environment. OBJECTIVE: To study the influence of ethnicity and country of birth for the prevalence of atopic disorders. METHODS: The prevalence of atopic disorders in Swedish residents born in Turkey and Chile, who settled in Sweden as adults in the 1980s, was compared with their own Swedish-born children and a sample of Swedish-born parents and their children in interview data from the Survey of Living Conditions in 1996. The study group included 1734 adults 27-60 years of age and their 2964 children aged 3-15. RESULTS: The Chilean-born parents and their children had the highest risk for allergic asthma; adjusted odds ratios (ORs) 2.2 (1.2-4.0) and 2.7 (1.6-4.5), respectively, and allergic rhino-conjunctivitis; OR 1.6 (1.1-3) and 1.6 (1.1-2.5) in both groups, when compared with the Swedish-born parents and their children. The Turkish-born parents and their children had the lowest risk for allergic rhino-conjunctivitis; both groups had OR 0.6 (0. 4-0.9) and the children in this group also had the lowest risk for eczema; OR; 0.4 (0.3-0.7). The risk for all atopic disorders was lower in the Turkish group compared with the Chileans. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that ethnicity is an important determinant of atopic disorder independent of the external childhood environment. The value of international comparisons of environment and risk for atopic disorders can be questioned until more is known about factors related to ethnicity, such as genetic susceptibility and diet, for the development of atopy.
PubMed ID
10718849 View in PubMed
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Fragile castles: the paradox of research politics, scientific progress, and the mutation of medical knowledge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17315
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2004 Sep;28(3):341-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Iman Roushdy-Hammady
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27704, USA. imanroushdy@yahoo.com
Source
Cult Med Psychiatry. 2004 Sep;28(3):341-67
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Carcinogens, Environmental - adverse effects
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Research
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mesothelioma - chemically induced - epidemiology - genetics
Narration
Physician's Role
Physician-Patient Relations
Pleural Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Rural Population
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Turkey - ethnology
Zeolites - adverse effects
Abstract
This paper is based on fieldwork done from 1996-1999 in different locations among village communities from Central Anatolia afflicted with the deadly malignancy of mesothelioma. Medical research has long established the relationship between mesothelioma and the environment; yet in earlier work correlations deduced through my genealogies provide evidence of a possible genetic cofactor causing these cancer deaths. This paper illustrates how medical research becomes an arena for local and global political interests and how the disruption of the doctor-cancer patient relationship impedes medical research. Methods include illness and clinical narratives, kinship charts and pedigrees, and observation of involved doctors and patients in multiple sites and geographical locations. Under focus are the anthropologist's involvement in global biomedical research and her interconnectedness with its political events.
PubMed ID
15600117 View in PubMed
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18 records – page 1 of 2.