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27 records – page 1 of 3.

Adjustment and behaviour of Finnish and Southern European immigrant children in Stockholm. I. The teachers' assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41461
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1979;7(3):105-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
G. Aurelius
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1979;7(3):105-13
Date
1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Aggression
Anxiety
Child
Child Behavior
Comparative Study
Educational Status
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Finland - ethnology
Greece - ethnology
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Male
Schools
Self Concept
Social Adjustment
Social Behavior
Social Class
Sweden
Teaching
Turkey - ethnology
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
The adjustment and behaviour of immigrant schoolchildren were studied by means of teacher interviews. The material consisted of 50 Finnish and 37 southern European children. For comparison, 44 Swedish migrant children were also sampled. All had settled in the County of Stockholm three years prior to the study. Swedish children who had lived in the county for more than four years served as controls. In the teachers' opinions the immigrants as a whole had adjustment difficulties more often than the controls, but the proportion of children with such difficulties was no higher among the immigrant children. Compared with the controls the immigrant children showed a higher frequency of symptoms relating to a disordered self-esteem. The immigrant children were also considered to have a lower status and to be less trustworthy than the controls. The schooling of these children demands serious attention in order to prevent discrimination and to promote a feeling of personal worth among the children.
PubMed ID
524077 View in PubMed
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Adolescents with Turkish background in Norway and Sweden: a comparative study of their psychological adaptation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71103
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2004 Feb;45(1):15-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Erkki Virta
David L Sam
Charles Westin
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research in International Migration and Ethnic Relations, Stockholm University, Sweden. erkki.virta@ceifo.su.se
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2004 Feb;45(1):15-25
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - ethnology - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Concept
Sweden - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
Abstract
Using a questionnaire survey, this study compared psychological adaptation (self-esteem, life satisfaction, and mental health problems) of Turkish adolescents in Norway and Sweden, and examined to what extent ethnic and majority identities, acculturation strategies, and perceived discrimination accounted for adaptation among Turkish adolescents. The samples consisted of 407 Turks (111 in Norway and 296 in Sweden) with a mean age of 15.2 years and 433 host adolescents (207 in Norway, 226 in Sweden) with a mean age of 15.6 years. Turks in Norway reported poorer psychological adaptation than Turks in Sweden. Predictors of good adaptation were Turkish identity and integration, whereas poor adaptation was related to marginalization and perceived discrimination. The results indicated that the poorer adaptation of Turks in Norway compared to that of Turks in Sweden could be due to lower degree of Turkish identity and higher degree of perceived discrimination.
PubMed ID
15016275 View in PubMed
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Cancer risks in childhood and adolescence among the offspring of immigrants to Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19153
Source
Br J Cancer. 2002 May 6;86(9):1414-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-6-2002
Author
Kari Hemminki
X. Li
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, 141 57 Huddinge, Sweden. kari.hemminki@cnt.ki.se
Source
Br J Cancer. 2002 May 6;86(9):1414-8
Date
May-6-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asia - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Databases, Factual
Emigration and Immigration
Epidemiologic Studies
Europe - ethnology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Leukemia - epidemiology - ethnology
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology - ethnology
Male
Nervous System Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
United States - ethnology
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
We used the nation-wide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to analyse the risk of nervous system tumours, leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in age groups 0-4 and 0-19 years among Swedish-born offspring of immigrants. The study included 850 000 individuals with an immigrant background, including European, Asian and American parents. We calculated standardised incidence ratios for the above three malignancies using Swedish offspring as a reference. Subjects were grouped by region or by selected countries of parental origin. No group differed significantly from Swedes in the occurrence of nervous system neoplasm or leukaemia. Offspring of Yugoslav fathers (SIR 2.27) and Turkish parents were at increased risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The highest risk was noted for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among young offspring (0-4 years) of two Turkish parents (6.87). The currently available limited data on rates for childhood non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in these countries do not explain the risk in the offspring of immigrants. Yugoslavs and Turks are recent immigrant groups to Sweden, and their offspring have been subject to much population mixing, perhaps leading to recurring infections and immunological stimulation, which may contribute to their excess of lymphomas.
PubMed ID
11986773 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of relevance for health in Turkish and Middle Eastern adolescent immigrants compared to Finnish immigrants and ethnic Swedish teenagers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90677
Source
Turk J Pediatr. 2008 Sep-Oct;50(5):418-25
Publication Type
Article
Author
Holmberg Lars I
Hellberg Dan
Author Affiliation
Child Health Unit, Falun Hospital, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun, Sweden.
Source
Turk J Pediatr. 2008 Sep-Oct;50(5):418-25
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Finland - ethnology
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle East - ethnology
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk-Taking
Sweden - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
Urban Population
Abstract
Our objective was to compare sociodemographic conditions and risky/health behaviors affecting Turkish or Middle Eastern versus ethnic Swedes and Finnish immigrant adolescents, respectively. All eligible adolescents 13-18 years old (3,216 pupils) in a medium-sized town in Sweden completed a validated in-depth questionnaire (Q90), with 165 questions. One hundred and one adolescents were Turkish or Middle Eastern immigrants, while 73 were immigrants from Finland, a neighboring country to Sweden. Turkish/Middle Eastern immigrants were more likely to attend a theoretical program in school, were rarely bullied, as compared to ethnic Swedes and Finns. Turkish/Middle Eastern girls used alcohol at a lower frequency, and reported less depression and sexual experiences than ethnic Swedish girls and Finns. A higher frequency of Finnish adolescents had been bullied and had vandalized, and Finnish adolescents were also determined to have used tobacco and cannabis and to be heavy drinkers more frequently than boys from Turkey/the Middle East. We concluded that adolescent immigrants from Turkey and the Middle East seem to be well adapted to Sweden and also have ambitions for a higher education. Differences in risky behaviors were particularly pronounced in comparisons with immigrants from Finland for both boys and girls.
PubMed ID
19102044 View in PubMed
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Contribution of sociodemographic and lifestyle-related factors to the differences in metabolic syndrome among Russian, Somali and Kurdish migrants compared with Finns.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287268
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2017 Apr 01;232:63-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-01-2017
Author
N. Skogberg
T. Laatikainen
A. Jula
T. Härkänen
E. Vartiainen
P. Koponen
Source
Int J Cardiol. 2017 Apr 01;232:63-69
Date
Apr-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Life Style
Male
Metabolic Syndrome - ethnology
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Russia - ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
Somalia - ethnology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Transients and Migrants
Turkey - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a substantially increased risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. We examined the contribution of length of residence, socioeconomic position and lifestyle-related factors to the differences in the prevalence of MetS among migrants compared with Finns.
Cross-sectional data from randomly sampled 30-64year-old health examination participants (318 Russian, 212 Somali, and 321 Kurdish origin migrants) of the Migrant Health and Wellbeing Survey (2010-2012) were used. Health 2011 Survey participants (n=786) were the reference group.
Compared with Finns, prevalence of MetS was significantly higher among all migrants except for Somali men. Among men, age-adjusted prevalence ratio (PR) of MetS compared with Finns was 1.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19-2.46 for Russians, PR 0.95 (95% CI 0.54-1.67) for Somali, and PR 2.10 (95% CI 1.51-2.93) for Kurds. Among women, respective PRs were 1.45 (95% CI 1.08-1.97) for Russians, PR 2.34 (95% CI 1.75-3.14) for Somali and PR 2.22 (95% CI 1.67-2.97) for Kurds. Adjustment for sociodemographic and lifestyle-related factors attenuated the differences in MetS among women but not men.
Further studies should aim at identifying factors related to elevated risk for MetS among Russian and Kurdish men. Interventions aiming at improving lifestyle-related factors are needed for reducing inequalities in the prevalence of MetS among migrant women. Effectiveness of interventions focusing on reducing overweight and obesity among Somali and Kurdish women should be evaluated.
PubMed ID
28108130 View in PubMed
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[Dental care habits in a group of immigrants from Turkey]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62952
Source
Tandlakartidningen. 1985 Jun 1;77(11):613-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1985

Dental caries and resources spent for dental care among immigrant children and adolescents in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34834
Source
Int Dent J. 1996 Apr;46(2):86-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
N J Wang
Author Affiliation
Department of Pedodontics and Caries Prophylaxis, Blindern, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Int Dent J. 1996 Apr;46(2):86-90
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
DMF Index
Dental Care for Children - statistics & numerical data
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Restoration, Permanent - statistics & numerical data
Emigration and Immigration
Health Resources - statistics & numerical data
Health services needs and demand
Health status
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Pakistan - ethnology
Public Health Dentistry
Time Factors
Turkey - ethnology
Vietnam - ethnology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to compare dental status and resource requirements in immigrants to Norway, three to 18 years of age, with Norwegians of the same age group. Data on dmft and DMFT, fillings placed and time spent for dental care were registered in the records of 9000 such children in the period 1992-93. Eleven per cent of the children were immigrant children. Immigrant children three to six years of age had fewer sound teeth and more decayed, missing and filled teeth than Norwegian children and the pre-school immigrant children had higher treatment needs. However, the time spent on a pre-school child with an immigrant background was shorter than the time spent on a Norwegian child with the same number of decayed teeth. The differences between immigrants and Norwegians disappeared with higher age. Immigrant children older than six years had dental health and resource requirements similar to those of Norwegian adolescents.
PubMed ID
8930679 View in PubMed
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Dental caries in Turkish immigrant primary schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38231
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1989 Jan;78(1):110-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1989
Author
I. Mejàre
S. Mjönes
Author Affiliation
Department of Pedodontics, Eastman Dental Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1989 Jan;78(1):110-4
Date
Jan-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Comparative Study
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dental Health Services - utilization
Dental Health Surveys
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
School Dentistry
Sweden
Turkey - ethnology
Abstract
Dental caries and the utilization of the Public Dental Service in Sweden were investigated in 84 Turkish immigrant children born in Sweden, 69 Turkish children born in Turkey and 85 Swedish age- and sex-matched controls. Dental fear was also studied. The mean age of the children was 8.3 years. Turkish immigrant children had more caries both in the primary and in the permanent teeth than Swedish children. Children born in Turkey had more caries in the primary dentition than those born in Sweden. Turkish children came more often for emergency visits than Swedish children and expressed dental fear more frequently. Turkish immigrant children therefore constitute a high risk group for caries and need supervision early after immigration.
PubMed ID
2919511 View in PubMed
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Dental health and access to dental care for ethnic minorities in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32729
Source
Ethn Health. 2000 Feb;5(1):23-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
A. Hjern
M. Grindefjord
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Huddinge University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden. anders.hjern@sos.se
Source
Ethn Health. 2000 Feb;5(1):23-32
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chile - ethnology
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data
Emigration and Immigration
Ethnic Groups
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Iran - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Minority Groups
Poland - ethnology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe access to dental care in a population-based sample of foreign-born Swedish residents in relation to dental health. DESIGN: The study was based on data from the Immigrant Survey of Living Conditions in four minority study groups consisting of a total of 1,898 Swedish residents born in Poland, Chile, Turkey and Iran aged 27-60. An age-matched study group of 2,477 Swedish-born residents from the Survey of Living Conditions of 1996 was added as a comparison group. The study also included 2,228 children aged 3-15 years in the minority households and 2,892 children in the households of the Swedish-born study group. RESULTS: The risk of poor dental health was higher in all four minority study groups than for the Swedish-born study group after adjusting for socio-economic variables. In the adult minority study groups the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for having prostheses and problems with chewing was 6.3 (4.3-9.1) and 2.7 (1.8-4.3), respectively, for the Polish-born, 4.8 (3.3-7.1) and 3.2 (2.1-4.9) for the Chilean-born, 4.6 (3.1-6.9) and 4.8 (3.6-7.2) for the Turkish-born, and 2.7 (1.5-4.8) and 6.5 (4.1-10.3) for the Iranian-born compared with the Swedish-born. In the child study group all four minority groups had an increased risk of caries ranging from OR 1.6 (1.3-2.1) in the Chilean group to 2.5 (2.0-3.0) in the Turkish group compared with the children with Swedish-born parents. The adults in all four minority study groups more often lacked regular treatment by a dentist than Swedish-born residents. The OR for not having been treated by a dentist during the 2 years preceding the interview ranged from 1.9 (1.4-2.6) in the Polish-born study group to 3.0 (2.3-4.0) in the Chilean-born study group after adjustment for socio-economic factors and general health. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that adults in minority populations in Sweden use less dental care despite having greater needs of dental treatment than the majority population. This inequity calls for action in health policy and preventive dental health programmes.
PubMed ID
10858936 View in PubMed
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27 records – page 1 of 3.