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189 records – page 1 of 19.

The 2000 tularemia outbreak: a case-control study of risk factors in disease-endemic and emergent areas, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188853
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2002 Sep;8(9):956-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Henrik Eliasson
Johan Lindbäck
J Pekka Nuorti
Malin Arneborn
Johan Giesecke
Anders Tegnell
Author Affiliation
Orebro University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2002 Sep;8(9):956-60
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Animals
Bites and Stings - microbiology
Case-Control Studies
Cat Diseases - microbiology - transmission
Cats
Culicidae - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Disease Vectors
Female
Francisella tularensis
Humans
Lymph Nodes - pathology
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tularemia - epidemiology - pathology - transmission
Abstract
A widespread outbreak of tularemia in Sweden in 2000 was investigated in a case-control study in which 270 reported cases of tularemia were compared with 438 controls. The outbreak affected parts of Sweden where tularemia had hitherto been rare, and these "emergent" areas were compared with the disease-endemic areas. Multivariate regression analysis showed mosquito bites to be the main risk factor, with an odds ratio (OR) of 8.8. Other risk factors were owning a cat (OR 2.5) and farm work (OR 3.2). Farming was a risk factor only in the disease-endemic area. Swollen lymph nodes and wound infections were more common in the emergent area, while pneumonia was more common in the disease-endemic area. Mosquito bites appear to be important in transmission of tularemia. The association between cat ownership and disease merits further investigation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
12194773 View in PubMed
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[A case of tularemia infection on Wrangel Island].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235630
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1987 Feb;(2):118-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1987
Author
R A Savel'eva
I S Meshcheriakova
L S Kamennova
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1987 Feb;(2):118-9
Date
Feb-1987
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Animals
Arvicolinae
Disease Vectors
Humans
Male
Siberia
Tularemia - pathology - transmission
PubMed ID
3554848 View in PubMed
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[Activation of natural tularemia foci of the field-meadow and steppe types on the territory of Tula Province 1977-1978].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243441
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1982 Mar;(3):36-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1982
Author
Z A Levacheva
A G Lobkovskii
V V Tikhonenko
M A Belova
M P Dolotova
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1982 Mar;(3):36-40
Date
Mar-1982
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arthropod Vectors
Arvicolinae - microbiology
Bacterial Vaccines - administration & dosage
Disease Reservoirs
Disease Vectors
Francisella tularensis - immunology
Geography
Humans
Rural Population
Russia
Ticks - microbiology
Tularemia - epidemiology - prevention & control
Urban Population
Abstract
Natural tularemia foci of the meadow and steppe type are extremely stable and become active in those years when the most favourable living conditions for rodents appear. For the first time during the last 30 years a great increase in the number of common voles, accompanied by widely spread epizooty covering the whole territory of the Tula region, was observed. House mice, common field mice, harvest mice and black rats were also involved in this epizooty and 235 tularemia patients with all clinical forms of the disease were registered, the pulmonary form of the disease being prevalent. The cases of the disease were observed among both urban and rural population. In spite of a high morbidity rate, no cases of group infection were registered in domestic conditions and among agricultural workers due to the existence of the numerous immune layer among the population. The formation of this layer resulted from planned vaccinal prophylaxis covering, on the average, 86.3% of the rural population of the region.
PubMed ID
6211008 View in PubMed
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Agglutinins and antibodies to Francisella tularensis outer membrane antigens in the early diagnosis of disease during an outbreak of tularemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38538
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1988 Mar;26(3):433-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1988
Author
L. Bevanger
J A Maeland
A I Naess
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Trondheim, Norway.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1988 Mar;26(3):433-7
Date
Mar-1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Agglutination Tests
Agglutinins - analysis
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Antigens, Bacterial - immunology
Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins - immunology
Child
Disease Outbreaks
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Francisella tularensis - immunology
Humans
Immunoassay
Immunoglobulins - immunology
Middle Aged
Norway
Tularemia - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Tularemia was diagnosed in 57 patients during an outbreak in central Norway in 1984 and 1985. Clinical categories of the disease showed seasonal variations. A bacterial microagglutination test and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with class-specific antibodies against Francisella tularensis outer membrane (OM) antigens were evaluated for the early diagnosis of tularemia. ELISA with immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgA, or IgM antibodies and the microagglutination test differed only marginally in diagnostic sensitivity. The OM preparation harbored F. tularensis agglutinogens and contained a variety of proteins, several of which functioned as immunogens in tularemia patients, as shown by Western blotting (immunoblotting). All 12 patients tested produced antibodies against a 43,000-molecular-weight OM protein. Individual variation was noted with regard to antibody response against other OM antigens. The OM is a suitable antigen preparation in ELISA for the diagnosis of tularemia and, presumably, contains antigens important in the immunobiology of tularemia.
PubMed ID
3356786 View in PubMed
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Airborne transmission of tularemia in farmers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239318
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1985;17(4):371-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
H. Syrjälä
P. Kujala
V. Myllylä
A. Salminen
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1985;17(4):371-5
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Air Microbiology
Finland
Francisella tularensis
Humans
Tularemia - pathology - radiography - transmission
Abstract
In a tularemia epidemic during 1982 in northern Finland, 53 patients showed no peripheral portal of entry for infection or associated lymphadenopathy. Respiratory symptoms were observed in 72% of the patients. 26/38 cases had abnormal chest films. Hilar adenopathy was the most common finding (36%). Four patients did not receive antibiotics; 43 received tetracyclines, 5 streptomycin and 1 cefuroxime and amoxycillin. All patients recovered. 50 patients acquired the infection during common farming activities, such as making fresh hay with a hay-cutter, handling dry hay, threshing, etc. Thus, airborne transmission may be an important source of infection in normal farming activities in endemic areas of tularemia.
PubMed ID
4089543 View in PubMed
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All-time high tularaemia incidence in Norway in 2011: report from the national surveillance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263869
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2014 Nov;33(11):1919-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
K W Larssen
K. Bergh
B T Heier
L. Vold
J E Afset
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2014 Nov;33(11):1919-26
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Francisella tularensis - isolation & purification
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Seasons
Topography, Medical
Tularemia - epidemiology - pathology
Young Adult
Abstract
Tularaemia has mainly been a sporadic disease in Norway. In 2011, 180 persons (3.7 per 100,000 population) were diagnosed with tularaemia. This article describes the epidemiological and clinical features of tularaemia cases during a year with exceptionally high tularaemia incidence. Data from the national reference laboratory for tularaemia combined with epidemiological data from the Norwegian Surveillance System for Communicable Diseases (MSIS) were used. The incidence of tularaemia varied greatly between counties, but almost every county was involved. The majority (77.8 %) of the cases were diagnosed during the autumn and winter months. The geographic distribution also showed seasonal patterns. Overall, oropharyngeal tularaemia (41.1 %) was the most common clinical presentation, followed by glandular (14.4 %), typhoidal (14.4 %), respiratory (13.3 %) and ulceroglandular (12.8 %) tularaemia. From January to April, oropharyngeal tularaemia dominated, from May to September, ulceroglandular tularaemia was most common, whereas from October to December, there was an almost even distribution between several clinical forms of tularaemia. Eighty-five (47.2 %) of all tularaemia cases were admitted to, or seen as outpatients in, hospitals. An unexpectedly high number (3.9 %) of the patients had positive blood culture with Francisella tularensis. The clinical manifestations of tularaemia in Norway in 2011 were diverse, and changing throughout the year. Classification was sometimes difficult due to uncharacteristic symptoms and unknown mode of transmission. In rodent years, tularaemia is an important differential diagnosis to keep in mind at all times of the year for a variety of clinical symptoms.
PubMed ID
24874046 View in PubMed
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An epidemic of tularemia in Sweden during the summer of 1967.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110927
Source
Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand. 1968;72(3):463-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1968

[An epidemiological investigation of a tularemia outbreak in Smolensk Province].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209083
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1997 Mar-Apr;(2):33-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
S V Rogutskii
M M Khramtsov
A V Avchinikov
O I Gar'kavaia
N V Larchenkova
A M Golovanov
T A Parfenova
L B Rudkovskaia
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1997 Mar-Apr;(2):33-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Antibody Specificity
Antigens, Bacterial - analysis
Child
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Disease Reservoirs
Disease Vectors
Francisella tularensis - immunology - isolation & purification
Humans
Russia - epidemiology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Tularemia - epidemiology - immunology - microbiology - transmission
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Water Microbiology
Abstract
The investigation of the epidemic outbreak of tularemia morbidity among the population of Vyaz'ma, was carried out. In this investigation the disease was shown to be transmitted by the water route due to contamination of water in the local water mains as the result of serious violations of the rules of using water supply systems. In the process of the investigation of this outbreak a natural focus of tularemia, not registered heretofore, was discovered. The work emphasizes the inadmissibility of deviations from the generally accepted tactics of tularemia control, consisting of a complex of prophylactic measures, such as the vaccination of the population, deratization and disinfection, the examination of the foci of infection, state sanitary surveillance, especially with regard to the sources of water supply and the quality of water preparation, raising the level of professional skills of the personnel and sanitary education.
PubMed ID
9245138 View in PubMed
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189 records – page 1 of 19.