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Air travel by individuals with active tuberculosis: reporting patterns and epidemiologic characteristics, Canada 2006-2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143508
Source
Travel Med Infect Dis. 2010 Mar;8(2):113-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Derek Scholten
Andrea Saunders
Kathryn Dawson
Thomas Wong
Edward Ellis
Author Affiliation
Community Acquired Infections Division, Centre for Communicable Diseases and Infection Control, Public Health Agency of Canada, 100 Eglantine Driveway, Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9, Canada. derek.scholten@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Travel Med Infect Dis. 2010 Mar;8(2):113-9
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aircraft
Canada - epidemiology
Communicable disease control
Contact Tracing - methods
Disease Notification - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Travel - statistics & numerical data
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - transmission
Young Adult
Abstract
Investigations related to tuberculosis (TB) cases on airline flights have received increased attention in recent years. In Canada, reports of air travel by individuals with active TB are sent to the Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) for public health risk assessment and contact follow-up. A descriptive analysis was conducted to examine reporting patterns over time.
Reports of air travel by individuals with active TB received by PHAC between January 2006 and December 2008 were reviewed. Descriptive analyses were performed on variables related to reporting patterns, characteristics and actions taken.
The number of reports increased each year with 18, 35 and 51 reports received in 2006, 2007 and 2008, respectively. Of the 104 total cases, most were male (63%) and born outside of Canada (87%). Ninety-eight cases (97%) met the criteria for infectiousness and a contact investigation was initiated for 136 flights.
Reports of air travel by individuals with active TB have been increasing annually in Canada in recent years. Outcomes of the subsequent contact investigations, including passenger follow-up results and evidence of TB transmission, is necessary to further evaluate the effectiveness of the Canadian guidelines.
PubMed ID
20478519 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
CMAJ. 1994 Dec 1;151(11):1639-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-1994

[Characteristics of localization and occurrence of tuberculous infection in rural areas].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231857
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1989;(8):13-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
V D Lomachenkov
M K Kosmachev
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1989;(8):13-7
Date
1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Carrier State - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Rural Population
Russia
Time Factors
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - transmission
Abstract
A long-term observation for 12 years revealed a tendency to stabilization of localization of tuberculous infection foci in rural areas and their main concentration in large villages. In such villages 82.7 per cent of new cases of tuberculosis and 80.3 per cent of new cases of tuberculous infection were recorded. The tension of the epidemiological situation with respect to tuberculosis in rural areas directly depended on the number of tubercle bacilli carriers living in such areas. It was maintained by three factors: migration of the bacilli carriers, the number of new cases of bacillary tuberculosis of the lungs and the results of their therapy. Among persons having family contacts with tubercle bacilli carriers, the incidence of pulmonary tuberculosis was 12.4 and 40.6 times higher than that resulting from professional and village contacts, respectively. A differential approach to organization of anti-epidemiological measures, early detection and prophylaxis of tuberculosis in rural areas is proposed.
PubMed ID
2530572 View in PubMed
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Conventional and molecular epidemiology of tuberculosis in Manitoba.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184093
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2003 Aug 13;3:18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-13-2003
Author
Kym S Blackwood
Assaad Al-Azem
Lawrence J Elliott
Earl S Hershfield
Amin M Kabani
Author Affiliation
National Reference Center for Mycobacteriology, National Microbiology Laboratory, Health, Canada, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. kym_blackwood@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2003 Aug 13;3:18
Date
Aug-13-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Molecular Epidemiology
Mycobacterium tuberculosis - genetics - isolation & purification
Risk factors
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - transmission
Abstract
To describe the demographic and geographic distribution of tuberculosis (TB) in Manitoba, thus determining risk factors associated with clustering and higher incidence rates in distinct subpopulations.
Data from the Manitoba TB Registry was compiled to generate a database on 855 patients with tuberculosis and their contacts from 1992-1999. Recovered isolates of M. tuberculosis were typed by IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify risk factors involved in clustering.
A trend to clustering was observed among the Canadian-born treaty Aboriginal subgroup in contrast to the foreign-born. The dominant type, designated fingerprint type 1, accounts for 25.8% of total cases and 75.3% of treaty Aboriginal cases. Among type 1 patients residing in urban areas, 98.9% lived in Winnipeg. In rural areas, 92.8% lived on Aboriginal reserves. Statistical models revealed that significant risk factors for acquiring clustered tuberculosis are gender, age, ethnic origin and residence. Those at increased risk are: males (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
12917019 View in PubMed
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Extent of transmission captured by contact tracing in a tuberculosis high endemic setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295651
Source
Eur Respir J. 2017 03; 49(3):
Publication Type
Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2017

Genetic fingerprinting in the study of tuberculosis transmission.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200259
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Nov 2;161(9):1165-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2-1999
Author
S. Kulaga
M A Behr
K. Schwartzman
Author Affiliation
Respiratory Division, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Que.
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Nov 2;161(9):1165-9
Date
Nov-2-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
DNA Fingerprinting
Humans
Incidence
Molecular Epidemiology
Mycobacterium tuberculosis - genetics
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - transmission
Notes
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PubMed ID
10569108 View in PubMed
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[Impact of family contact on development of tuberculosis in infants and preschool children].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209916
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1997;(4):9-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
E V Bogdanova
Author Affiliation
Russian State Medical University, Moscsow.
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1997;(4):9-11
Date
1997
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Transmission, Infectious
Family Health
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Morbidity
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - transmission
Abstract
The paper outlines the results of following up 50 infants and preschool children who had contacts on their families. The major sources of infection were equally both their mother and their father. The children were found to have pronounced active processes. The most severe types of tuberculosis were common in infants in whom general, military tuberculosis and tuberculous meningitis along with complicated types in intrathoracic lymph node tuberculosis were detected. There was more commonly a phase of dissemination and decay in infants. Severe types of tuberculosis were encountered in the families having a combination of many unfavourable factors, both medical and social ones. Among the children who had fallen ill, 32% were detected on their visits to polyclinics of upon admissions to general hospitals.
PubMed ID
9333828 View in PubMed
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Impact of immigration on the molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a low-incidence country.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162107
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007 Nov 1;176(9):930-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2007
Author
Ulf R Dahle
Vegard Eldholm
Brita A Winje
Turid Mannsåker
Einar Heldal
Author Affiliation
Division of Infectious Disease Control, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. ulf.dahle@fhi.no
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007 Nov 1;176(9):930-5
Date
Nov-1-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cluster analysis
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Middle Aged
Mycobacterium tuberculosis - genetics
Norway - epidemiology
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length - genetics
Risk factors
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - transmission
Abstract
Programs to prevent the incidence rate of tuberculosis (TB) from increasing in many low-incidence countries are challenged by international travel and immigration from high-burden countries.
The current study aimed to determine the effect of such immigration on the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in an entire nation's population during 1994-2005.
A total of 3,131 patients were notified with TB during the 12-year period. Of these, 2,284 (73%) had TB verified by culture, and isolates from 2,173 (96%) of these were analyzed by IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism.
Only 31% of the included strains were isolated from nonimmigrants, the remaining 69% were isolated from immigrants. Although the incidence increased throughout the period, the genetic diversity remained high. A total of 135 clusters were identified; the percentage of recent disease was reduced among nonimmigrants, and remained stable among the immigrants during the study period. Although 69% of the isolates originated from immigrants from high-incidence countries, the established TB control program in the receiving country was adequate for the prevention of disease transmission. On average per year, only 2 nonimmigrants and 13 immigrants developed disease as a result of infection within the country by imported M. tuberculosis.
Twelve years of M. tuberculosis importation as a result of immigration from high-incidence countries had little influence on the transmission of this pathogen in the receiving low-incidence country. To prevent future increase of transmission of TB, the current control strategies of low-incidence countries are adequate but must be maintained.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007 Nov 1;176(9):840-217951558
PubMed ID
17673698 View in PubMed
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Incidence and relative risk for hepatitis A, hepatitis B and tuberculosis and occurrence of malaria among merchant seamen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56777
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1996;28(2):107-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
H L Hansen
K G Hansen
P L Andersen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Maritime Medicine, South Jutland University Centre, Esbjerg, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1996;28(2):107-10
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Confidence Intervals
Denmark - epidemiology
Fisheries
Follow-Up Studies
Hepatitis A - epidemiology - transmission
Hepatitis B - epidemiology - transmission
Humans
Incidence
Malaria - epidemiology - transmission
Male
Middle Aged
Reference Standards
Registries
Risk factors
Travel
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - transmission
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to assess the incidence and relative risk of hepatitis A and B and tuberculosis among Danish merchant seamen. We also assessed the occurrence of malaria. The study was based on record linkage of a research database containing data on 24,132 Danish male seamen and the Registry for Notifiable Infectious Diseases in Denmark, supplemented by data from other sources. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) for hepatitis A for male seamen was 1.77 (0.91-3.10) as compared with the incidence in the general population. The incidence was 0.9 notified cases/10,000 years. The SIR for hepatitis B for male seamen was 3.02 (1.79-4.78), the main risk factors being intravenous drug use and casual sex abroad. Tuberculosis was not more common among seamen than in non-seamen. The results have implications for vaccination strategies in this occupational group. Malaria occurred frequently in the seamen, especially among those involved in West African trade. Irregular use of malaria prophylaxis and probably chloroquine resistance were of importance in some cases. To detect further cases of hepatitis A and B and malaria, other sources were reviewed. Only a few extra cases were identified. The registry of notifiable infectious diseases was thus found to be rather complete.
PubMed ID
8792473 View in PubMed
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[Incidence of tuberculosis among workers engaged in the penitentiary system in the Republic of Udmurtia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182996
Source
Probl Tuberk Bolezn Legk. 2003;(9):5-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003

27 records – page 1 of 3.