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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Case-finding in the elimination phase of tuberculosis: high risk groups in epidemiology and clinical practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228967
Source
Bull Int Union Tuberc Lung Dis. 1990 Jun-Sep;65(2-3):73-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
D A Enarson
E A Fanning
E A Allen
Author Affiliation
Tuberculosis Services, Alberta Health and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Bull Int Union Tuberc Lung Dis. 1990 Jun-Sep;65(2-3):73-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - complications
Canada - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Risk factors
Silicosis - complications
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
PubMed ID
2257366 View in PubMed
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The potential impact and cost-effectiveness of tobacco reduction strategies for tuberculosis prevention in Canadian Inuit communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301113
Source
BMC Med. 2019 02 04; 17(1):26
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-04-2019
Author
Dieynaba S N'Diaye
Ntwali Placide Nsengiyumva
Aashna Uppal
Olivia Oxlade
Gonzalo G Alvarez
Kevin Schwartzman
Author Affiliation
Montreal Chest Institute, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
BMC Med. 2019 02 04; 17(1):26
Date
02-04-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Decision Support Techniques
Humans
Inuits
Latent Tuberculosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prevalence
Public Health - methods
Risk factors
Tobacco Smoking - adverse effects - prevention & control
Tobacco Use Cessation - economics - methods
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Tuberculosis (TB) remains a significant public health problem in Canadian Inuit communities. In 2016, Canadian Inuit had an incidence rate 35 times the Canadian average. Tobacco use is an important risk factor for TB, and over 60% of Inuit adults smoke. We aimed to estimate changes in TB-related outcomes and costs from reducing tobacco use in Inuit communities.
Using a transmission model to estimate the initial prevalence of latent TB infection (LTBI), followed by decision analysis modelling, we conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis that compared the current standard of care for management of TB and LTBI without additional tobacco reduction intervention (Status Quo) with (1) increased tobacco taxation, (2) pharmacotherapy and counselling for smoking cessation, (3) pharmacotherapy, counselling plus mass media campaign, and (4) the combination of all these. Projected outcomes included the following: TB cases, TB-related deaths, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and health system costs, all over 20?years.
The combined strategy was projected to reduce active TB cases by 6.1% (95% uncertainty range 4.9-7.0%) and TB deaths by 10.4% (9.5-11.4%) over 20?years, relative to the status quo. Increased taxation was the only cost-saving strategy.
Currently available strategies to reduce commercial tobacco use will likely have a modest impact on TB-related outcomes in the medium term, but some may be cost saving.
PubMed ID
30712513 View in PubMed
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Source
CMAJ. 1996 Jul 15;155(2):162-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-1996
Author
R K St John
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Jul 15;155(2):162-3
Date
Jul-15-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Humans
Prisons
Risk factors
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Notes
Comment On: CMAJ. 1996 Jan 15;154(2):236-88548712
PubMed ID
8800071 View in PubMed
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[The impact of ecological pressing on tuberculosis and nonspecific lung diseases in the Astrakhan' region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210137
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1997;(1):27-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
L A Vinnik
Author Affiliation
Medical Academy, Astrakhan'.
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1997;(1):27-30
Date
1997
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiologic Factors
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Lung Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Morbidity - trends
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Survival Rate - trends
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The correlation analysis was used to examine the epidemiological indices of the morbidity of tuberculosis, pneumonia, chronic bronchitis, bronchial asthma, and lung cancer in the Astrakhan region in 1987-1994. The indices were compared with each other and with varying air, water, and soil levels of toxicants. The magnitude of the effects of pollutants on the incidence of respiratory diseases ranged from 61% (for tuberculosis) to 93.3% (for pneumonia). The effects of the water and soil concentrations of toxicants proved to be less insignificant, by varying from 28.7% in tuberculosis to 4.8% in lung cancer. The effects of toxicant levels on tuberculosis morbidity are 5 times less than those during fibrous-cavernous processes and twice less than in first detected tuberculosis at the stage of decay with bacterial isolation. The pollutants containing sulfur were found to adversely affect mainly patients with tuberculosis or lung cancer. The study makes it necessary to consider patients with the aforesaid diseases as the objects of ecological pressing that directly has impact on the course of diseases and their outcomes.
PubMed ID
9162917 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.