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Increasing trends in HIV and TB rates in Odessa and the Ukraine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7153
Source
Int J STD AIDS. 2005 May;16(5):374-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
F. Drobniewski
V. Nikolayevsky
A. Asmolov
Yu Bazhora
S. Servetsky
Author Affiliation
HPA Mycobacterium Reference Unit and Department of Infectious Diseases, King's College Hospital (Dulwich), East Dulwich Grove, London SE22 8QF, UK. francis.drobniewski@kcl.ac.uk
Source
Int J STD AIDS. 2005 May;16(5):374-8
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Notification
HIV Infections - complications - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tuberculosis - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
Notification rates for HIV and tuberculosis (TB) have increased in the Ukraine and particularly in Odessa. In 1962, the incidence of TB in Odessa region was 178 cases per 100,000 cases, declining to 73.0, 42.0 and 41.6 cases per 100,000 in 1972, 1982 and 1992, respectively. In 2002, TB incidence and prevalence were 80.4 and 330.1/100,000 population, respectively. TB mortality in the port almost doubled from 10.2/100,000 to 21.6/100,000 between 1990 and 2001. In 2002, the HIV incidence and prevalence and AIDS incidence and prevalence were 46.4 and 241.0 cases/100,000 population and 14.5/100,000 and 26.9/100,000, respectively. There are increasing numbers of TB cases co-infected with HIV (200 in 2002), suggesting that the HIV and TB epidemics are converging. Significant effort is needed for the effective control of these two outbreaks to prevent high levels of morbidity and mortality from these diseases.
PubMed ID
15949069 View in PubMed
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Risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma following tuberculosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20080
Source
Br J Cancer. 2001 Jan 5;84(1):113-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-5-2001
Author
J. Askling
A. Ekbom
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Box 281, Stockholm, S-171 77, Sweden. johan.askling@mep.ki.se
Source
Br J Cancer. 2001 Jan 5;84(1):113-5
Date
Jan-5-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cause of Death
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Tuberculosis - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
To study the association between chronic infections and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), we assessed the risk of NHL in a Swedish cohort of 5050 individuals with tuberculosis 1939-1960. The overall relative risk was moderately increased, largely accounted for by high risks following severe tuberculosis diagnosed a long time ago.
PubMed ID
11139323 View in PubMed
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Secular trends of tuberculosis in western Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8129
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 1993;71(3-4):297-306
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
M C Raviglione
P. Sudre
H L Rieder
S. Spinaci
A. Kochi
Author Affiliation
Tuberculosis Programme, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 1993;71(3-4):297-306
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Emigration and Immigration
Europe - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Population Dynamics
Population Surveillance
Transients and Migrants
Tuberculosis - complications - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
Deaths due to tuberculosis have decreased uniformly in all countries in Western Europe, and most have occurred among those aged > or = 65 years. In recent years, tuberculosis case notifications have continued to decline in Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, and Spain, and have levelled off in Sweden and the United Kingdom; increases have, however, been recorded in Austria, Denmark, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, and Switzerland. In Denmark, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, and Switzerland an increasing number of cases of tuberculosis among foreign-born residents has resulted in a change from the expected downward trend. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection appears to contribute only marginally to the overall tuberculosis morbidity; however, it appears to be important in Paris and its surrounding areas, and tuberculosis is very common among HIV-infected persons in Italy and Spain. Despite these recent changes in the incidence of tuberculosis, there is currently no evidence of its increased transmission among the youngest age groups of the indigenous populations. Properly designed disease surveillance systems are critical for monitoring the tuberculosis trends so that each country can identify its own high-risk groups and target interventions to prevent, diagnose, and treat the disease. Tuberculosis remains a global disease and because of increasing human migrations, its elimination in Western Europe cannot be envisaged without concomitant improvements in its control in high-incidence, resource-poor countries.
PubMed ID
8324847 View in PubMed
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Tuberculosis in the eastern European countries and the former USSR.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7446
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2001;14(2):54-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
W. Kipp
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 2001;14(2):54-9
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Antitubercular Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Commonwealth of Independent States - epidemiology
Communicable disease control
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Disease Notification
Europe, Eastern - epidemiology
Humans
Russia - epidemiology
Tuberculosis - complications - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Abstract
This article provides a situational analysis of the increasing trends in the tuberculosis case notification in Eastern Europe and the former USSR. In the Russian Federation, one main reason for the spread of tuberculosis is the insufficient funding of TB control measures which were very costly in the past and which cannot be sustained due to the current economic problems. The author also describes his own experience as technical advisor to a TB control program in western Siberia.
PubMed ID
11414074 View in PubMed
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Tuberculosis trends in eastern Europe and the former USSR.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7936
Source
Tuber Lung Dis. 1994 Dec;75(6):400-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
M C Raviglione
H L Rieder
K. Styblo
A G Khomenko
K. Esteves
A. Kochi
Author Affiliation
Tuberculosis Programme, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.
Source
Tuber Lung Dis. 1994 Dec;75(6):400-16
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antitubercular Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Disease Notification
Europe, Eastern - epidemiology
Female
HIV Infections - complications
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Tuberculosis - complications - epidemiology - mortality
USSR - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this paper is to assess trends in tuberculosis morbidity and mortality in the countries of Eastern Europe and the former USSR. Data on morbidity and mortality were obtained from reports of the Ministries of Health, a 1992 WHO questionnaire, national tuberculosis associations, and other sources. The quality of surveillance of tuberculosis cases differs widely between countries. Ranging from 19 to 80 per 100,000 population in 1990-1992, tuberculosis notification rates of most Eastern European and former USSR countries are higher than those of Western European countries. The lowest tuberculosis notification rate is reported in the Czech Republic, while the highest are reported in Romania and Kazakhstan. While in Albania, Croatia and Slovenia notification rates have continued to decline, in the remaining countries of Eastern Europe the declining trend has recently stopped. Nevertheless, countries such as the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and the Slovak Republic have experienced a distinct rate decrease when the 3-year average rate around 1985 is compared to that around 1990, despite the very recent levelling-off or increase. In Romania, the previous decline in notification rate ended in 1985 and in the period 1986-1992 an average 5.4% annual increase was observed. In this country, two-thirds of all cases still occur among young adults. Among the Baltic countries of the former USSR, the declining trend continues in Estonia, whereas in Latvia and Lithuania notification rates decreased less markedly from 1985 to 1990 than in the first half of the 1980s. Among the other European countries of the former USSR, Russia and Ukraine had a slow decline in the first half of the 1980s and a more pronounced one from 1985 to 1990. During the latter period of time, in Belarus and Moldova the decrease has been steeper. In the Caucasian countries of the former USSR, where underreporting and low case-finding are recognized, case rates have stabilized in Armenia, while in Azerbaijan and Georgia there was a decrease from 1985 to 1990. Among the Asian countries of the former USSR, Kazakhastan and Tajikistan reported a lower decline in case rates from 1985 to 1990 than from 1980 to 1985. Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan reported increases in notification rates from 1985 to 1990: in Turkmenistan an average 5.5% annual increase in rate was observed between 1987 and 1991. Tuberculosis mortality is steadily increasing in Romania, Armenia, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, and Turkmenistan, while no decline is seen in most of the other countries of Eastern Europe and the former USSR.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)
PubMed ID
7718828 View in PubMed
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