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Source
Pneumologie. 1994 Feb;48(2):151-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1994
Author
K. Styblo
C. Ferlinz
Author Affiliation
Deutsches Zentralkomitee zur Bekämpfung der Tuberkulose III. Med. Universitätsklinik-Pneumologie, Mainz.
Source
Pneumologie. 1994 Feb;48(2):151-5
Date
Feb-1994
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
BCG Vaccine - administration & dosage
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
English Abstract
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Immunization Programs
Incidence
Infant
Netherlands - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tuberculin Test
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Abstract
It is evident from follow-up studies of tuberculosis in the Netherlands (without BCG vaccination), Sweden (discontinuation of BCG vaccination since 1975) and in both parts of Germany (FRG discontinuation since 1975), as well as from the favourable tuberculosis situation in both parts of Germany (low tuberculosis incidence and very low infection risk) that general vaccination of babies is no longer warranted. For this reason the German Central Committee for Combatting Tuberculosis is considering in consultation with the Federal Bureau of Health to abstain from continuing to recommend general BCG vaccination of all newborn. BCG vaccination should be recommended only in enhanced-risk groups (children of foreign parents and children sharing their living quarters or household with a person suffering from acute, i.e. infectious tuberculosis).
PubMed ID
8183867 View in PubMed
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[Migration and tuberculosis in Austria].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218518
Source
Gesundheitswesen. 1994 Apr;56(4):208-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
E. Zehetner
G W Wallner
Author Affiliation
Gesundheitsamt der Stadt Wien.
Source
Gesundheitswesen. 1994 Apr;56(4):208-10
Date
Apr-1994
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Austria - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Developing Countries
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Abstract
For a long time the risk of importing tuberculosis via immigrants and asylum seekers from countries with a high infection prevalence has been a much-discussed problem. Statistically significant increases in tuberculosis incidence were first regitered in the USA in the wake of several immigration waves, and then the former colonial powers in Europe, France and the United Kingdom, were faced with the problem in the 50 s and 60 s. It was found that not only tuberculosis morbidity, but also the risk of infection and illness were much higher among immigrants from the former African colonies, the West Indies, Pakistan, and India than among the native Europeans, which gave rise to the utmost concern. The same reactions were incited by the first reports on the so-called "foreign-worker tuberculosis" from Switzerland in the early 60 s and not much later from the FRG. Although tuberculosis morbidity among foreign workers and their relatives remained twice as high as among the indigenous population, tuberculosis has continually gone down in Switzerland and the FRG in subsequent years. The initial concern that a relatively high rate of foreigners could have long-lasting epidemiological consequences was not confirmed.
PubMed ID
8019068 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.