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558 records – page 1 of 56.

ABO blood groups and tuberculosis in North and East Greenlanders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6505
Source
Scand J Respir Dis. 1974;55(2):162-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1974

[A category of patients with tuberculosis concomitant with HIV infection in an anti-TB facility].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184198
Source
Probl Tuberk Bolezn Legk. 2003;(5):6-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
F A Batyrov
O P Frolova
G N Zhukova
I G Sementsova
O I Mukhanova
Source
Probl Tuberk Bolezn Legk. 2003;(5):6-9
Date
2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Catchment Area (Health)
Female
HIV Seropositivity - epidemiology
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Preventive Health Services
Russia - epidemiology
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - prevention & control - rehabilitation
Abstract
A category of patients with tuberculosis concomitant with HIV infection, who were admitted for inpatient care to the infection department of Tuberculosis Clinical Hospital No. 7, Moscow, during 1996-2001, was analyzed. Peculiarities of the mentioned patients' category (205 subjects) were studied at the anti-TB facility. It was established that males (83.4%), aged 21-30 (48.9%), as well as unemployed (71%) prevailed. As much as 14% of them were homeless and 33% had a prison history. Drug-addiction (76%) and hepatitis C and B (77%) were found to be the key concomitant pathologies in them. HIV was primarily diagnosed at the anti-TB facility in 52% of patients, while tuberculosis had set on before HIV in 34.8% of patients. A major part of patients with tuberculosis concomitant with HIV, who were at the anti-TB facility, had early HIV stages. Specific features of the clinical course of tuberculosis were defined for patients with early HIV stages. It was established that tuberculosis concomitant with early HIV stages is deprived of any peculiarities except for the primary signs' stage, if it has the form of an acute infection. An exacerbation of the tuberculosis process, which quite often leads to its generalization and fatal outcome, can happen during the mentioned period due to a pronounced immunodeficiency.
PubMed ID
12899005 View in PubMed
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[Achievements and improvement in tuberculosis control in the western regions of the Ukrainian SSR]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69856
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1982 Aug;(8):3-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1982
Author
A F Gavrilenko
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1982 Aug;(8):3-5
Date
Aug-1982
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Mass Screening
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - prevention & control
Ukraine
PubMed ID
7145897 View in PubMed
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[Adolescence tuberculosis in Moscow: epidemiological situation and problems].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160007
Source
Probl Tuberk Bolezn Legk. 2007;(10):29-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
E S Ovsiankina
L B Stakheeva
Source
Probl Tuberk Bolezn Legk. 2007;(10):29-31
Date
2007
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Catchment Area (Health)
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Prevalence
Pulmonary Medicine - standards
Russia - epidemiology
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology
Abstract
The paper provides the data of analysis of antituberculous care to teenagers in Moscow and characterizes its problems. Emphasis is placed on the tense and unstable situation associated with the detection of the disease in this age group. In the bulk of adolescents, the disease is identifies when they come to see a doctor, including at somatic hospitals. Active tuberculosis detection techniques (tuberculin diagnosis and fluorography) fail to produce adequate effect mainly due to organizational problems (the bulk of teenagers are outside the organized collective bodies or the latter are frequently changed; the detection of tuberculosis in Moscow nonresidents or in whose who enter secondary specialized colleges claims attention). Age-related sociomedical risk factors, such as hormonal rearrangement, comorbidity, a negative attitude towards preventive medical measures, deviant behavior, social family, and dysadaption, are of importance for the development of tuberculosis. A sociomedical portrait of an adolescent with tuberculosis is given. Attention is drawn to the fact that on implementing antituberculous measures, it is a need for an interaction of a tuberculosis-controlling service with general care health network facilities, including those that deal with the problems of social diseases and educational establishments.
PubMed ID
18051838 View in PubMed
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[A gathering of the chief pulmonary tuberculosis specialists in the branches of the Armed Forces, military districts and the Navy].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195754
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2000 Aug;321(8):89-93
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Aug-2000

[Age and sex characteristics of tuberculosis incidence among urban population during the period 1959-1971]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42675
Source
Vrach Delo. 1975 May;(5):11-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1975

[Age-sex characteristics of tuberculosis incidence among the population of Vinnitsa]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42317
Source
Probl Tuberk. 1976 Apr;(4):9-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1976

[Alarming tendency in the transmission of tuberculosis among Danish men]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69301
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Jan 24;167(4):388-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-24-2005
Author
Troels Lillebaek
Vibeke Ostergaard Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Statens Serum Institut, Mykobakteriologisk Laboratorium, København. tll@ssi.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Jan 24;167(4):388-91
Date
Jan-24-2005
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Mycobacterium tuberculosis - genetics
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - transmission
PubMed ID
15719563 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol sales and mortality due to pulmonary tuberculosis: relationships at a populational level].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177551
Source
Probl Tuberk Bolezn Legk. 2004;(9):53-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004

[Amyloidosis in the autopsy data from a general hospital of Leningrad].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224985
Source
Ter Arkh. 1992;64(1):97-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
D Z Kagan
Source
Ter Arkh. 1992;64(1):97-100
Date
1992
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Amyloidosis - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Autopsy - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, General - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Urban - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Russia - epidemiology
Sex Factors
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology - mortality - pathology
Abstract
Over the recent 20 years the incidence of amyloidosis did not undergo any noticeable changes, accounting for 1.48% of the total number of autopsies in 1964-1968 and for 1.52% in 1984-1988 (P less than 0.5). The number of cases of the clinically unrecognized amyloidosis increased from 37.5% in the first period to 52.18% in the second one. In most cases amyloidosis affects the kidneys (94.9%), spleen (58.2%), liver (48%) and then, in the descending order, there follow adrenals, intestine, heart, pancreas and other organs (the total data for both the periods).
PubMed ID
1387991 View in PubMed
Less detail

558 records – page 1 of 56.