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14 records – page 1 of 2.

Bone and joint tuberculosis: a continuing problem.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247571
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1979 Jan 20;120(2):139-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-1979
Author
D A Enarson
M. Fujii
E M Nakielna
S. Grzybowski
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1979 Jan 20;120(2):139-45
Date
Jan-20-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
British Columbia
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Tuberculosis - epidemiology
Tuberculosis, Osteoarticular - diagnosis - epidemiology - radiography
Abstract
Although tuberculous disease of bones and joints is becoming uncommon, it still occurs and may cause devastating sequelae. It is frequently not diagnosed prior to the onset of permanent damage to the joints or spine; the most important reason for this delay may be the fact that it is not considered in the differential diagnosis of monoarthritis or back pain. Most persons with the disease have other evidence of tuberculosis. Not infrequently an aggressive approach (including synovial biopsy or surgical exploration of the back) is needed to confirm the diagnosis when there are no other clues.
Notes
Cites: Am J Med. 1970 Jan;48(1):77-844906108
Cites: Am Rev Respir Dis. 1975 May;111(5):641-61130756
Cites: Postgrad Med J. 1971 Nov;47(553):723-45159675
Cites: Br Med J. 1968 Mar 16;1(5593):682-35640649
PubMed ID
761142 View in PubMed
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Bone and Joint tuberculosis in Greater Manchester 1969-79.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243490
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 1982 Feb;41(1):1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1982
Author
P. Newton
J. Sharp
K L Barnes
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 1982 Feb;41(1):1-6
Date
Feb-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
England
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Tuberculosis, Osteoarticular - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
The records of 74 patients diagnosed as suffering from tuberculous (TB) bone or joint disease between 1969 and 1979 were analysed retrospectively. Most were resident in the Greater Manchester County. Thirty-eight patients were first-generation immigrants, and teenage males were particularly prominent in this group. In the indigenous patients the diagnosis was often delayed several months or years, and in a number of subjects there was a history of previous bone and joint tuberculosis. There was a wide range of affected sites, especially in the immigrant group, and evidence of nonarticular TB was found in only a minority of patients. Diagnosis is most satisfactorily based on open biopsy and submission of pathological material to culture and histology. British subjects were more likely to have to undergo remedial surgery for the disease, especially when weight bearing joints were involved. Antituberculous chemotherapy should be given for at least 1 year to prevent recurrence of the disease.
Notes
Cites: Br Med J. 1968 Mar 16;1(5593):682-35640649
Cites: Am J Med. 1972 Jul;53(1):36-425037287
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 1974 Nov;56-B(4):760-54452725
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1978 Oct;(136):257-63729294
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1979 Jan 20;120(2):139-45761142
PubMed ID
7065721 View in PubMed
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Characteristics and Clinical Outcome of Bone and Joint Tuberculosis From 1994 to 2011: A Retrospective Register-based Study in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272059
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2015 Aug 15;61(4):554-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-15-2015
Author
Isik S Johansen
Stig L Nielsen
Malene Hove
Michala Kehrer
Shakil Shakar
Arne V T Wøyen
Peter H Andersen
Stephanie Bjerrum
Christian Wejse
Åse B Andersen
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2015 Aug 15;61(4):554-62
Date
Aug-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antitubercular Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Debridement
Denmark - epidemiology
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Tuberculosis, Osteoarticular - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - therapy
Tuberculosis, Spinal - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - therapy
Young Adult
Abstract
Most information on bone-joint (BJ)-tuberculosis is based on data from high-incidence areas. We conducted a nationwide register-based analysis of BJ-tuberculosis in Denmark from 1994 to 2011.
We linked data from the national tuberculosis surveillance system on BJ-tuberculosis, hospital records, the Danish Hospital and Civil Registration System.
We identified 282 patients with BJ-tuberculosis, 3.6% of all tuberculosis cases (n = 7936). Spinal tuberculosis was found in 153 of 282 patients (54.3%); 83.3% of all cases were immigrants. Danes were older and had higher Charlson comorbidity index scores than immigrants (P
PubMed ID
25908683 View in PubMed
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[Clinical and epidemiological features of tuberculosis ostitis in BCG-vaccinated children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89811
Source
Probl Tuberk Bolezn Legk. 2009;(1):16-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Kamaeva N G
Chugaev Iu P
Grinberg L M
Anisimova N A
Golubeva T V
Kamaev E Iu
Source
Probl Tuberk Bolezn Legk. 2009;(1):16-20
Date
2009
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
BCG Vaccine - adverse effects
Child, Preschool
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Mycobacterium bovis - genetics - isolation & purification
Osteitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Siberia - epidemiology
Tuberculosis, Osteoarticular - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - epidemiology
Abstract
There has been a drastic increase in the incidence of ostitis in children since 2001. Comparison of current tuberculous ostitis (n = 70) and primary pulmonary tuberculosis (n = 60) in infants revealed significant clinical and epidemiological differences. Molecular genetic methods identified BCG M. bovis strain DNA in 13 (46.4%) intraoperative samples and 4 samples of obtained cultures from bone destruction foci. Isolation of BCG cultures and/or verification of BCG M. ovis DNA from the bone lesion focus by polymerase chain reaction is a significant criterion for verification of the BCG etiology of ostitis having a morphological pattern of productive necrotic tuberculosis in children.
PubMed ID
19253678 View in PubMed
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[Extrapulmonary tuberculosis in children in Russia (epidemiology, clinical forms and their study)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193486
Source
Probl Tuberk. 2001;(4):6-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
V A Aksenova
T I Sen'kina
Source
Probl Tuberk. 2001;(4):6-9
Date
2001
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Russia - epidemiology
Tuberculosis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Tuberculosis, Central Nervous System - diagnosis - epidemiology
Tuberculosis, Lymph Node - diagnosis - epidemiology
Tuberculosis, Osteoarticular - diagnosis - epidemiology
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - diagnosis - epidemiology
Tuberculosis, Urogenital - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
The paper provides the data of comprehensive epidemiological and clinical studies made at the Clinic of Tuberculosis in Children and Adolescents. Research Institute of Phthisiopulmonology, I. M. Sechenov Moscow Medical Academy, Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, in the past 15 years and dedicated to extrapulmonary tuberculosis in children and adolescents with tuberculosis. Due to the specific features of manifestations of extrapulmonary tuberculosis in childhood and adolescence and to the existing system of prevention and early detection of the disease in children and teenagers in the Russian Federation, the number of children with severe generalized extrapulmonary tuberculosis is not on the rise despite that the epidemiological situation has aggravated in the past 15 years. The clinical features of most common forms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis are shown and measures for their monitoring proposed.
PubMed ID
11523380 View in PubMed
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[Further cases of bone and joint tuberculosis in Stockholm]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36708
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 May 13;89(20):1771
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-13-1992
Author
B. Petrini
C. Burgos
Author Affiliation
Bakteriologiska avdelningen, Stockholms läns landstings mikrobiologiska centrallaboratorium.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 May 13;89(20):1771
Date
May-13-1992
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sweden - epidemiology
Tuberculosis, Osteoarticular - diagnosis - epidemiology
PubMed ID
1598036 View in PubMed
Less detail

Osteitis and other complications caused by generalized BCG-itis. Experiences in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40459
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1982 May;71(3):471-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1982
Author
M. Böttiger
V. Romanus
C. de Verdier
G. Boman
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1982 May;71(3):471-8
Date
May-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
BCG Vaccine - adverse effects
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Mycobacterium bovis
Osteitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden
Tuberculosis, Osteoarticular - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
In 1973 an increase in the number of osteitis caused by BCG vaccination in the neonatal period was observed in Sweden. A high incidence of this complication, i.e. 1 case per 3000 vaccinated newborn children continued until this vaccination was interrupted in 1975. In the years 1972 to 1980 a total of 90 cases were reported to the Adverse Drug Reaction Committee. Earlier retrospective studies had disclosed 36 cases born between 1949-1968 and an active search for unreported cases in the 1970s revealed an additional 26 cases. Of the total of 152 known cases in Sweden, 82 were boys and 70 girls. The mean incubation period was 14 months for boys and 23 for girls. Extremely long incubation periods were seen, i.e. 6 years in two children and 12 years in one. Eleven children had multiple osteitis lesions. The epiphyses of the long bones of the extremities were the most frequent sites of the affection (109 lesions). Only in 6 patients the spine, which is the common site of osteitis caused by tuberculosis, was affected. Relapses occurred in two patients.
PubMed ID
6753476 View in PubMed
Less detail

Tuberculosis epidemiology and selection in an autochthonous Siberian population from the 16th-19th century.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259935
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(2):e89877
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Henri Dabernat
Catherine Thèves
Caroline Bouakaze
Dariya Nikolaeva
Christine Keyser
Igor Mokrousov
Annie Géraut
Sylvie Duchesne
Patrice Gérard
Anatoly N Alexeev
Eric Crubézy
Bertrand Ludes
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(2):e89877
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cluster analysis
Ethnic Groups - genetics - history
Genotype
History, 16th Century
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
Humans
Mycobacterium tuberculosis - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Selection, Genetic
Sequence Analysis, DNA - methods
Siberia - epidemiology
Tuberculosis, Osteoarticular - diagnosis - epidemiology - history - pathology
Abstract
Tuberculosis is one of most ancient diseases affecting human populations. Although numerous studies have tried to detect pathogenic DNA in ancient skeletons, the successful identification of ancient tuberculosis strains remains rare. Here, we describe a study of 140 ancient subjects inhumed in Yakutia (Eastern Siberia) during a tuberculosis outbreak, dating from the 16(th)-19(th) century. For a long time, Yakut populations had remained isolated from European populations, and it was not until the beginning of the 17(th) century that first contacts were made with European settlers. Subsequently, tuberculosis spread throughout Yakutia, and the evolution of tuberculosis frequencies can be tracked until the 19(th) century. This study took a multidisciplinary approach, examining historical and paleo-epidemiological data to understand the impact of tuberculosis on ancient Yakut population. In addition, molecular identification of the ancient tuberculosis strain was realized to elucidate the natural history and host-pathogen co-evolution of human tuberculosis that was present in this population. This was achieved by the molecular detection of the IS6110 sequence and SNP genotyping by the SNaPshot technique. Results demonstrated that the strain belongs to cluster PGG2-SCG-5, evocating a European origin. Our study suggests that the Yakut population may have been shaped by selection pressures, exerted by several illnesses, including tuberculosis, over several centuries. This confirms the validity and necessity of using a multidisciplinary approach to understand the natural history of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24587092 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.