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Encouraging outcomes in the first year of a TB control demonstration program: Orel Oblast, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182981
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2003 Nov;7(11):1045-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
T. Kherosheva
L E Thorpe
E. Kiryanova
L. Rybka
V. Gerasichev
M. Shulgina
E. Nemtsova
T. Aptekar
H. Kluge
W. Jakubowiak
M. Grzemska
G. Aquino
C. Wells
B. Kazionny
Author Affiliation
Orel Oblast TB Dispensary, Orel Oblast TB Control Program, Orel, Russian Federation.
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2003 Nov;7(11):1045-51
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Directly Observed Therapy
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Russia
Treatment Outcome
Tuberculosis, Multidrug-Resistant - prevention & control
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - prevention & control
Abstract
Orel, Russia.
To evaluate outcomes of tuberculosis (TB) patients treated in the first year of a TB control demonstration project using a revised strategy of directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS). Standard methods recommended by World Health Organization (WHO) were adapted to include mycobacterial cultures.
Retrospective cohort analysis of TB patients diagnosed between October 1999 and September 2000.
Among 749 TB patients, 65% had bacteriologic confirmation of pulmonary TB, 31% were diagnosed clinically, and 4% had extra-pulmonary TB. Most (92%) had no previous TB treatment, but 8% were identified as retreatment cases. Of all patients, 41% had new sputum smear-positive TB. No patients were HIV-infected. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB levels were 3% among new and 17% among retreatment patients. Among new smear-positive patients, treatment success was 79% (72% cure, 7% completion); remaining outcomes were 8% failure, 3% default, 8% death, and 1% transfer. Success rates for new culture-positive and clinically diagnosed patients were 81% and 91%, respectively.
Despite historical differences, successful implementation of the revised TB strategy in Russia is possible. Treatment success rates were high, suggesting WHO targets of 85% cure for smear-positive patients is attainable. Obstacles include drug resistance and elevated death rates among smear-positive patients.
PubMed ID
14598963 View in PubMed
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Implications of the growing HIV-1 epidemic for tuberculosis control in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192551
Source
Lancet. 2001 Nov 3;358(9292):1513-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-3-2001
Author
B. Kazionny
C D Wells
H. Kluge
N. Gusseynova
V. Molotilov
Source
Lancet. 2001 Nov 3;358(9292):1513-4
Date
Nov-3-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS-Related Opportunistic Infections - prevention & control
Adult
Disease Outbreaks
HIV Infections - epidemiology
HIV-1
Humans
Prisoners
Risk
Russia - epidemiology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Tuberculosis, Multidrug-Resistant - prevention & control
Abstract
Orel oblast, Russia, is the site of a WHO demonstration project for tuberculosis control. We used data acquired by the Center for Prevention of AIDS and Infectious Diseases to show that, in this region, the seroprevalence of HIV-1 infection has increased 33-fold in 4 years. The rapid spread of HIV-1 in Russia has serious implications for control of tuberculosis epidemics. Although the HIV-1 epidemic is at an early stage, aggressive prevention measures must be taken quickly to avoid the adverse effects of widespread HIV on tuberculosis control that have been seen in sub-Saharan Africa.
PubMed ID
11705567 View in PubMed
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Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 1999 May;3(5):365
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
S. Spinaci
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 1999 May;3(5):365
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Prisoners
Siberia
Treatment Failure
Tuberculosis, Multidrug-Resistant - prevention & control
Notes
Comment On: Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 1999 May;3(5):451-310331736
PubMed ID
10331722 View in PubMed
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