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An outbreak of tuberculosis in pigs and cattle caused by Mycobacterium africanum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69621
Source
Vet Rec. 1992 Jul 18;131(3):51-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-18-1992
Author
S. Alfredsen
F. Saxegaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Food Hygiene, Norwegian College of Veterinary Medicine, Oslo.
Source
Vet Rec. 1992 Jul 18;131(3):51-3
Date
Jul-18-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cattle
Disease Outbreaks - veterinary
Lymph Nodes - microbiology - pathology
Mycobacterium - isolation & purification
Norway - epidemiology
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - pathology
Tuberculin Test - veterinary
Tuberculosis - epidemiology - pathology - veterinary
Tuberculosis, Bovine - epidemiology - pathology
Abstract
An outbreak of tuberculosis in pigs and cattle caused by Mycobacterium africanum produced lesions in the pigs similar to those caused by M tuberculosis, M bovis and M avium, with caseation in the lymph nodes of the head and in the jejunal lymph nodes. Bacteriological examination of the dysgonic mycobacteria isolated showed that they were M africanum I. The intradermal tuberculin test was very reliable in pigs, differentiating between mammalian and avian reactions, and the results of the test were in accordance with the lesions found at meat inspection. No clinical signs were observed during the outbreak, and the infection was neither serious nor progressive. There were no lesions in the tuberculin-positive cattle. The source of the infection remains unknown.
PubMed ID
1441162 View in PubMed
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Assessment of the probability of introducing Mycobacterium tuberculosis into Danish cattle herds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276373
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2015 Nov 1;122(1-2):92-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2015
Author
Alessandro Foddai
Liza Rosenbaum Nielsen
Kaspar Krogh
Lis Alban
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2015 Nov 1;122(1-2):92-8
Date
Nov-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cattle
Commerce
Denmark - epidemiology
Emigrants and Immigrants
Humans
Mycobacterium tuberculosis - physiology
Probability
Risk factors
Tuberculin Test
Tuberculosis, Bovine - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Tuberculosis is a zoonosis caused by Mycobacterium spp. International trade in cattle is regulated with respect to Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) but not Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis), despite that cattle can become infected with both species. In this study we estimated the annual probability (PIntro) of introducing M. tuberculosis into the Danish cattle population, by the import of cattle and/or by immigrants working in Danish cattle herds. Data from 2013 with date, number, and origin of imported live cattle were obtained from the Danish cattle database. Information on immigrants working in Danish cattle herds was obtained through a questionnaire sent to Danish cattle farmers. The gained inputs were fed into three stochastic scenario trees to assess the PIntro for the current and alternative test-and-manage strategies, such as testing of imported animals and/or testing immigrant workers with the tuberculin skin test. We considered the population of Danish farmers and practitioners free of tuberculosis, because in Denmark, the incidence of the disease in humans is low and primarily related to immigrants and socially disadvantaged people. The median annual probability of introducing M. tuberculosis into the Danish cattle population due to imported live cattle was 0.008% (90% P.I.: 0.0007%; 0.03%), while the probability due to immigrant workers was 4.1% (90% P.I.: 0.8%; 12.1%). The median combined probability (PIntro) due to imported cattle plus workers was 4.1% (90% P.I.: 0.8%; 12.6%). Hence, on average at least one introduction each 24 (90% P.I.: 8; 125) years could be expected. Imported live cattle appeared to play a marginal role on the overall annual PIntro, because they represented only approximately 0.2% of the median annual probability. By testing immigrant workers the overall annual PIntro could be reduced to 0.2% (90% P.I.: 0.04%; 0.7%). Thus, testing of immigrant workers could be considered as a risk mitigation strategy to markedly reduce the likelihood of introducing M. tuberculosis into the Danish cattle population, if the risk is considered unacceptable by the veterinary public health authorities.
PubMed ID
26385106 View in PubMed
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Assessment of the probability of introduction of bovine tuberculosis to Danish cattle farms via imports of live cattle from abroad and immigrant workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276173
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2015 Dec 1;122(3):306-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-2015
Author
Alessandro Foddai
Liza Rosenbaum Nielsen
Kaspar Krogh
Lis Alban
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2015 Dec 1;122(3):306-17
Date
Dec-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Cattle
Denmark - epidemiology
Emigrants and Immigrants
Farmers
Humans
Interferon-gamma
Mycobacterium bovis - physiology
Probability
Risk factors
Transportation
Tuberculin Test - veterinary
Tuberculosis, Bovine - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Denmark has been recognized as officially free (OTF) from bovine tuberculosis (bTB) since 1980. In this study, we estimated the annual probability (PIntro) of introducing Mycobacterium bovis into the Danish cattle population, through (a) imports of cattle and (b) foreign personnel working in Danish cattle herds. Data from 2000 to 2013 with date, number and origin of imported live cattle were obtained from the Danish Cattle Federation. Information on immigrants working in Danish cattle herds was obtained through a questionnaire sent by email to a sample of Danish cattle farmers (N=460). Inputs obtained from data analysis, expert opinion, the questionnaire and literature were fed into three stochastic scenario tree models used to simulate the effect of import trade patterns, and contact between immigrant workers and cattle. We also investigated the opportunity of testing animals imported from OTF countries by tuberculin skin test and animals from non-OTF countries by interferon-? test (IFN-?), exemplified by using year 2009 where the number of imported animals was higher than usual. Results showed that PIntro is driven mainly by importation of live cattle. The combined median annual probability of introducing M. bovis into the Danish cattle population by either imported live cattle or infectious immigrant workers, ranged from 0.3% (90% prediction interval (P.I.): 0.04%:1.4%) in 2001 to 4.9% (90% P.I.: 0.6%; 19.2%) in 2009. The median of the median PIntro estimates from the 14 years was 0.7% (median of 90% P.I.: 0.08%; 3.5%). Hence, on average, at least one introduction each 143 years could be expected, if the annual number of imported animals does not change remarkably in the future. If the number of imported animals increases, compared to the years we analyzed, additional testing of imported cattle might be considered. For example, in 2009, PIntro would have been reduced from 4.9% to 0.8% (90% P.I.: 0.1%; 4.7%) if animals from OTF countries had been tested with the tuberculin skin test and animals from non-OTF countries had been tested with the IFN-? test. The presented model could be used easily in other countries with similar bTB status to Denmark, where wildlife represents a negligible probability of infection for domestic cattle and where the imported live cattle represent the main pathway of bTB introduction into the local cattle population.
PubMed ID
26409756 View in PubMed
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Bovine tuberculosis in man--reinfection or endogenous exacerbation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69914
Source
Scand J Respir Dis. 1978 Jun;59(3):167-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1978
Author
I. Sjögren
O. Hillerdal
Source
Scand J Respir Dis. 1978 Jun;59(3):167-70
Date
Jun-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Cattle
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mycobacterium bovis
Sweden
Tuberculosis, Bovine - epidemiology - transmission
Abstract
Cattle tuberculosis was totally eradicated in Sweden 20 years ago. Twelve cases of bovine tuberculosis in man were reported in 1974 and 1975. All cases lived for many years in areas where cattle tuberculosis had previously been common. No recent source of infection could be demonstrated. These findings are in accordance with an exacerbation of a distant infection.
PubMed ID
356255 View in PubMed
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[Dynamics of major constituents of tuberculosis morbidity in the population of Novosibirsk region]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69442
Source
Probl Tuberk. 2000;(2):6-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
V M Efimov
Iu K Galaktionov
Iu N Kurunov
O V Reviakina
Source
Probl Tuberk. 2000;(2):6-8
Date
2000
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cattle - microbiology
English Abstract
Humans
Morbidity - trends
Population Surveillance
Siberia - epidemiology
Tuberculosis - epidemiology
Tuberculosis, Bovine - epidemiology
Abstract
After processing the dynamic series of tuberculosis morbidity in the population of the Novosibirsk region by the smooth component methods, two major constituents were defined in morbidity dynamics. In total, they make up about half the total variability of tuberculosis morbidity. The first constituent is due to socioeconomic causes that are common for the whole region. The second one shows rather evident 10-year fluctuations. The same 10-year fluctuations are observed in the dynamics of tuberculosis morbidity among the cattle of the Novosibirsk region by out-stripping that in the population in the northern and eastern areas by 1-3 years.
PubMed ID
10838897 View in PubMed
Less detail

Epidemiological basis of tuberculosis eradication. 3. Risk of pulmonary tuberculosis after human and bovine infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70217
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 1966;35(4):483-508
Publication Type
Article
Date
1966

23 records – page 1 of 3.