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385 records – page 1 of 39.

[7000 AID treatments, 660 pregnancies in 5 years in Sweden]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65845
Source
Lakartidningen. 1980 Sep 17;77(38):3229-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-17-1980

Absorbing information about a child's incurable cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96768
Source
Oncology. 2010;78(3-4):259-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Patrizia Lannen
Joanne Wolfe
Jennifer Mack
Erik Onelov
Ullakarin Nyberg
Ulrika Kreicbergs
Author Affiliation
Phyllis F. Cantor Center, Boston, MA, USA.
Source
Oncology. 2010;78(3-4):259-66
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude to Death
Bereavement
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality - psychology
Parents
Professional-Family Relations
Questionnaires
Sweden
Terminal Care - methods
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
PURPOSE: To assess parents' ability to absorb information that their child's cancer was incurable and to identify factors associated with parents' ability to absorb this information. PATIENTS AND METHODS: An anonymous mail-in questionnaire study was performed as a population-based investigation in Sweden between August and October of 2001. 449 parents who lost a child to cancer 4-9 years earlier (response rate 80%) completed the survey. 191 (43%) of the bereaved parents were fathers and 251 (56%) were mothers. RESULTS: Sixty percent of parents (n = 258) reported that they were able to absorb the information that their child's illness was incurable. Parents were better able to absorb this information when the information was given in an appropriate manner (RR 1.6; CI 1.3-2.0), when they shared their problems with others during the child's illness course (RR 1.4; CI 1.1-1.8) and when they had no history of depression (RR 1.3; CI 1.0-1.8). Parents who reported that they were able to absorb the information were more likely to have expressed their farewells to the child in their desired manner (RR 1.3; CI 1.0-1.5). CONCLUSIONS: Parents who received information that their child's illness was incurable in an appropriate manner are more likely to absorb that information. Whether or not parents are able to absorb the information that their child's cancer is incurable has implications in terms of preparation for the child's impending death.
PubMed ID
20523086 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of reported weight and menstrual status in teenage girls with eating disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70529
Source
Int J Eat Disord. 2005 Dec;38(4):375-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Ingemar Swenne
Erik Belfrage
Barbro Thurfjell
Ingemar Engström
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University Children's Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. ingemar.swenne@akademiska.se
Source
Int J Eat Disord. 2005 Dec;38(4):375-9
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Amenorrhea - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Anorexia Nervosa - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Body Weight
Bulimia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Statistics
Sweden
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The current study investigated the accuracy of reported current and historical weights and of menstrual status in teenage girls with eating disorders. METHOD: Reported current weight in one interview was compared with measured weight at another occasion. Reported historical weights were compared with documented weights from growth charts of the school health services. Reports of menstrual status from two different interviews were compared. RESULTS: The overall correlation between reported and measured/documented weight was high. Current weight was reported with high accuracy in all diagnostic groups and without tendencies to underreport. Patients with bulimia nervosa, but not those with anorexia nervosa, underreported their historical top weight. The most common reason for large discrepancies between reported and documented historical weights was that the two weights compared referred to different time points. The reports on menstrual status were divergent for 13% of the patients, most notably 4 of 15 patients on oral contraceptives had been categorized as having menstruations in one of the interviews. CONCLUSION: Reported weight history and menstrual status are of high accuracy in teenage girls with eating disorders.
PubMed ID
16231335 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of self-reported body weight compared to measured body weight. A population survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235826
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1987;15(3):191-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
L. Jalkanen
J. Tuomilehto
A. Tanskanen
P. Puska
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1987;15(3):191-8
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Awareness
Blood pressure
Body Weight
Diet, Reducing - psychology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
In 1977, in the evaluation of the prevention programme for cardiovascular diseases, 11,880 persons in Eastern Finland were asked to report their own weight on a questionnaire. Each participant was weighted during the following clinical examination. The data of the self-reported body weight were analysed according to sex, age, measured weight and body-mass index (BMI). The results showed that older people underestimated their weight to a greater extent than did younger people of both sexes. The error between measured and self-reported weight was greater in heavier subjects than in thinner individuals. In both sexes weight estimate error (measured weight minus self-reported weight) correlated more strongly with high BMI than with measured weight. Associations between weight estimate error and other variables were studied using a multiple regression model. Men whose annual family income was low were more likely to underestimate their weight than the men with a high annual income. In general, women reported their weight more correctly than men did. Older women were more likely to report their weight less than younger women, whereas women who visited their doctor frequently or who had higher annual family incomes were more aware of their actual body weight than those who had few doctor's consultations or whose family income was low. In men 5.2% and in women 8.3% of the variation in the weight estimate error was explained by the regression model.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
3616534 View in PubMed
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Achieving closure through disclosure: experience in a pediatric institution.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180246
Source
J Pediatr. 2004 May;144(5):559-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004

Adolescent disclosure and concealment: longitudinal and concurrent associations with aggression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113486
Source
Aggress Behav. 2013 Sep-Oct;39(5):335-45
Publication Type
Article
Author
Chelom E Leavitt
David A Nelson
Sarah M Coyne
Craig H Hart
Author Affiliation
School of Family Life, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, USA.
Source
Aggress Behav. 2013 Sep-Oct;39(5):335-45
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Aggression - psychology
Child
Child, Preschool
Crime Victims - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Peer Group
Russia
Self Report
Sex Factors
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
This longitudinal study assessed the association between prior (preschool) and concurrent physical and relational aggression as they relate to Russian adolescents' disclosure and concealment patterns with their parents. In the initial preschool study, there were 106 boys and 106 girls (mean age?=?60.24 months, SD?=?7.81). Both peer nominations and teacher ratings of aggression were obtained for these children. Ten years later, the majority of these children (72.2%; n?=?153) completed a longitudinal follow-up battery of assessments. Included in these measures was a self-reported measure of aggression as well as an assessment of the extent to which these adolescents disclosed to and concealed information from their parents. Separate models were estimated by gender of child for the 153 children who participated in both Time 1 and Time 2 data collections. Preschool physical aggression proved an important longitudinal predictor of adolescent disclosure and concealment for girls. Concurrently, self-rated relational aggression was also significantly associated with concealment for both boys and girls.
PubMed ID
23720152 View in PubMed
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Adult female victims of child sexual abuse: multitype maltreatment and disclosure characteristics related to subjective health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29748
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2005 Jun;20(6):651-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Eva Jonzon
Frank Lindblad
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2005 Jun;20(6):651-66
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child Abuse - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Disclosure
Severity of Illness Index
Social Support
Sweden - epidemiology
Truth Disclosure
Women's health
Abstract
This study examined the impact of child sexual abuse and disclosure characteristics on adult psychological and psychosomatic symptoms. Data on abuse characteristics, disclosure-related events, and subjective health were collected through semistructured interviews and questionnaires from 123 adult women reporting having been sexually abused in childhood by someone close. The results indicate that disclosure-related events have a stronger relation than abuse characteristics to long-term consequences of childhood sexual abuse. In particular, a positive reaction from a partner was related to fewer symptoms. Of the abuse characteristics, exposure also to physical abuse was strongly associated to psychological sequelae.
PubMed ID
15851534 View in PubMed
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Adult recovered memories of childhood sexual abuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211764
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1996 Jun;41(5):305-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996

Adverse effects of a social contract smoking prevention program among children in Qu├ębec, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148588
Source
Tob Control. 2009 Dec;18(6):474-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
S. Kairouz
J. O'Loughlin
J. Laguë
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Concordia University, Montreal, Québec, Canada. skairouz@alcor.concordia.ca
Source
Tob Control. 2009 Dec;18(6):474-8
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior - psychology
Competitive Behavior
Female
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Peer Group
Quebec - epidemiology
School Health Services
Self Efficacy
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - methods
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
To evaluate the impact of a smoke-free class competition in elementary schools in Québec, Canada before widespread dissemination of the program across the province.
In a quasiexperimental study design, 843 students in 27 schools exposed to "Mission TNT.06" were compared to 1213 students in 57 matched comparison schools. Baseline data were collected in grade 6 prior to implementation of the program. Follow-up data were collected in grade 7 after students had transitioned to secondary school.
The program improved knowledge about the harmful effects of second-hand smoke, but had no impact on knowledge about the harmful effects of smoking, attitudes about the acceptability of cigarettes, beliefs about the tobacco industry, or self-efficacy to resist peer pressure to smoke. After exposure to the program, intervention students were more likely to misreport their smoking status and to report unfavourable attitudes about classmates who smoke.
Mission TNT.06 may encourage young smokers to misreport their smoking status and to marginalise classmates who smoke. These findings prompted recommendations to conduct more in-depth evaluation of the smoke-free class competition before widespread dissemination of the program across the province.
PubMed ID
19748883 View in PubMed
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385 records – page 1 of 39.