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Body image in adolescents with cerebral palsy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89896
Source
J Child Health Care. 2009 Mar;13(1):19-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Hammar Görel Råsmark
Ozolins Andrejs
Idvall Ewa
Rudebeck Carl Edward
Author Affiliation
Habilitation Centre, Oskarshamn, Sweden. gorelrh@ltkalmar.se
Source
J Child Health Care. 2009 Mar;13(1):19-29
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Analysis of Variance
Attitude to Health
Body Image
Case-Control Studies
Cerebral Palsy - psychology
Disabled Persons - psychology
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Mobility Limitation
Nurse's Role
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Methodology Research
Questionnaires
Sex Factors
Sweden
Trust - psychology
Abstract
The study aims to describe important features of body image in adolescents with motor disabilities and compare them against similar features in able-bodied peers. Relational aspects of body image were given preference in a questionnaire distributed to 35 adolescents with cerebral palsy and 98 adolescents with no known disabilities. Similarities were shown, but also significant differences, indicating a less favourable body image in adolescents with cerebral palsy. It is paramount for young people who are constantly reminded of physical restrictions to experience body vitality. Professionals need to consider the importance of how they interact with young people when seeking to promote a positive body image.
PubMed ID
19240188 View in PubMed
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Caring relationship in a context: fieldwork in a medical ward.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78239
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2007 Apr;13(2):100-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Berg Linda
Skott Carola
Danielson Ella
Author Affiliation
The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden. linda.berg@fhs.gu.se
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2007 Apr;13(2):100-6
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Chronic Disease - nursing - psychology
Communication
Cooperative Behavior
Empathy
Female
Hospital Departments
Hospitals, County
Humans
Internal Medicine
Long-Term Care - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Sweden
Trust - psychology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate how the caring relationship is formed in a medical context. The data were collected using participant observation with field notes and analysed by an interpretive phenomenological method. The context circumstances in a medical milieu demanded exacting efficiency and risks to oppress the caring relationship, subsequently causing demands in nursing practice. Three themes of the caring relationship were identified as respect for each other and for themselves, responsibility to reach out to each other and engagement. Patients' and nurses' awareness in encounters drove the forming of a caring relationship that went beyond the individual nurse and patient. This study implicates the importance of an understanding of how context circumstances create the foundation of the caring relationship.
PubMed ID
17394517 View in PubMed
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Children in health research: a matter of trust.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144647
Source
J Med Ethics. 2010 Apr;36(4):211-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Roberta L Woodgate
Marie Edwards
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, Helen Glass Centre for Nursing, University of Manitoba, 89 Curry Place, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3T 2N2. Roberta_Woodgate@umanitoba.ca
Source
J Med Ethics. 2010 Apr;36(4):211-6
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Biomedical research
Canada
Child
Child Welfare - ethics - psychology
Focus Groups
Humans
Middle Aged
Parents - psychology
Patient Participation - psychology
Physician-Patient Relations - ethics
Questionnaires
Trust - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Central to the involvement of children in health research is the notion of risk. In this paper we present one of the factors, a matter of trust, that shaped Canadian parents' and children's perceptions and assessments of risk in child health research.
Part of a larger qualitative research study, 82 parents took part an in-depth qualitative interview, with 51 parents having children who had participated in health research and 31 having children with no research history. 51 children ranging from 6 to 19 years of age were also interviewed, with 28 having a history of participation in child health research and 23 having no history. Children also took part in 3 focus groups interviews. Themes emerged through a grounded theory analysis of coded interview transcripts.
The presence or absence of trust was not only perceived by parents and children as a contributing factor to involving children in health research, but also shaped their perceptions and assessments of risk. Three interrelated subthemes identified were: (1) relationships of trust; (2) placing trust in symbols of authority; and (3) the continuum of trust.
Our study reinforces that trust is an important factor when parents assess risk in child health research and shows that children use the language of trust in relation to risk. More discussion regarding trust in training researchers is warranted given the trust in researchers and institutions evident in this study. We also recommend further study of the continuum of trust in child health research.
PubMed ID
20338931 View in PubMed
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Children's knowledge and degree of participation in decision making when undergoing a clinical diagnostic procedure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93759
Source
Pediatr Nurs. 2007 Nov-Dec;33(6):505-11
Publication Type
Article
Author
Runeson Ingrid
Mårtenson Eva
Enskär Karin
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Behavioral Sciences, University of Kalmar, Kalmar, Sweden.
Source
Pediatr Nurs. 2007 Nov-Dec;33(6):505-11
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia, Local - psychology
Anxiety - etiology - psychology
Catheterization, Peripheral - psychology
Child
Child Psychology
Child, Hospitalized - education - psychology
Decision Making
Fear
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health services needs and demand
Hospitals, County
Humans
Laboratory Techniques and Procedures - nursing - psychology
Male
Nursing Methodology Research
Parents - psychology
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Patient Participation - methods - psychology
Questionnaires
Sweden
Trust - psychology
Abstract
Twenty-three children, (6-11 years, 9 boys and 14 girls), admitted to a pediatric day care department for a planned diagnostic procedure were interviewed with the aim of investigating their level of knowledge regarding a current diagnostic procedure, and the level of participation in discussions and decision making relating to their hospitalization. While the children were being interviewed, their attendant parent completed a questionnaire. The children's level of knowledge was documented and graded. The children's statements and their parents' evaluation of the information given to the child were sorted into groups and compared. The children's descriptions of their participation in discussions and decision-making were assessed and summarized. Finally, the children's and their parents' experiences of the children's anxiety and fear before the hospital visit were compared. The children were undergoing different kinds of diagnostic procedures and they had received information from different people. They were prepared for their admission in different ways, and had participated in discussions and decisions to various degrees. Despite this preparation, it would be safe to state that the participants as a group were not very well informed nor did they participate fully. More knowledge is needed regarding how to prepare each child prior to admission, before, during, and after the hospital visit and which additional factors, e.g., trust and a familiar environment, have influence on the child's experience.
PubMed ID
18196714 View in PubMed
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The concept of patient satisfaction in adolescent psychiatric care: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137546
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs. 2011 Feb;24(1):3-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Páll Biering
Valgerõur H Jensen
Author Affiliation
School of Health Science, Faculty of Nursing, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. pb@hi.is
Source
J Child Adolesc Psychiatr Nurs. 2011 Feb;24(1):3-10
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychiatry - standards
Child
Clinical Competence
Female
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Iceland
Interviews as Topic
Male
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Professional-Patient Relations
Psychiatric Department, Hospital
Qualitative Research
Quality Assurance, Health Care - standards
Quality Indicators, Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Safety
Social Isolation
Social Participation
Trust - psychology
Abstract
Few studies have asked how adolescents perceive the quality of psychiatric care. Therefore, the aim of the study was to explore adolescents' perception of quality of care and of satisfying treatment outcomes.
Fourteen adolescents participated in this hermeneutic study.
Several concepts describing adolescents' perspective of quality of care were found: secure place, tough love, peer solidarity, self-expression, and person not patient. Concepts describing satisfying treatment outcomes fell into four categories: improved mental health, personal development, strengthening of the self, and improved family relations.
By casting light on users' perspectives, the study offers guidance for improvement of quality of care and for the development of patient satisfaction instruments.
PubMed ID
21272109 View in PubMed
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Creating trust in an acute psychiatric ward.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91670
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2008 Nov;15(6):777-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2008
Author
Helene Hem Marit
Heggen Kristin
Ruyter Knut W
Author Affiliation
University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. m.h.hem@medisin.uio.no
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2008 Nov;15(6):777-88
Date
Nov-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Clinical Competence
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Mental Disorders - nursing - psychology
Norway
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Patient Participation - methods - psychology
Philosophy, Nursing
Power (Psychology)
Psychiatric Nursing - methods
Questionnaires
Restraint, Physical - psychology
Trust - psychology
Abstract
The ideal of trust pervades nursing. This article uses empirical material from acute psychiatry that reveals that it is distrust rather than trust that is prevalent in this field. Our data analyses show how distrust is expressed in the therapeutic environment and in the relationship between nurse and patient. We point out how trust can nonetheless be created in an environment that is characterized by distrust. Both trust and distrust are exposed as ;fragile' phenomena that can easily ;tip over' towards their opposites. Trust is not something that nurses possess or are given; it is rather something that they earn and have to work hard to achieve. Regarding themselves as potential causes of distrust and active wielders of power can contribute to nurses developing a more realistic view of their practice. Assuming a realistic middle-way perspective can help to manoeuvre between the extremities of excellence and resignation, which in turn can lead to processes that create trust between psychotic patients and nurses.
PubMed ID
18849367 View in PubMed
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Development and implementation of a group based mental health intervention for unaccompanied minors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298211
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2019 Feb; 60(1):7-15
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Ferdinand Garoff
Samuli Kangaslampi
Kirsi Peltonen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Sciences/Psychology, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2019 Feb; 60(1):7-15
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Minors - psychology
Professional-Patient Relations
Psychotherapy, Group - methods
Refugees - psychology
Resilience, Psychological
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - therapy
Trust - psychology
Abstract
Unaccompanied refugee minors (UMs) are at significant risk to experience severe mental health symptoms (Derluyn, Broekaert & Schuyten). Trauma-focused treatments have been found to be effective for traumatized refugees (Slobodin & de Jong). However, trauma-focused mental health services are seldom available, and treatment fails when UMs lack trust in service providers (Majumder, O'Reilly, Karim & Vostanis). In order to address this gap, a 10-session group based mental health intervention for UMs was developed and then pilot tested in 3 accommodation units for UMs in Finland. The implementation and effectiveness of the intervention was studied by qualitative and quantitative methods. The process was completed by 18 UMs. Symptom measures showed no statistically significant changes on the mental health variables studied. However, staff members and UMs reported increased trust and communication, and participating staff members felt empowered to facilitate groups independently. The group model promoted social interaction and built trust in the accommodation units. Further studies are required to UMs.
PubMed ID
30452082 View in PubMed
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Doctor-patient communications in the Aboriginal community: towards the development of educational programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168226
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2006 Sep;62(3):340-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Angela Towle
William Godolphin
Ted Alexander
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine & Division of Health Care Communication, College of Health Disciplines, The University of British Columbia, 3250-910 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V5Z 4E3. atowle@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2006 Sep;62(3):340-6
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
British Columbia
Clinical Competence - standards
Communication
Cultural Diversity
Empathy
Fear - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American - education - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Psychological
Needs Assessment
Patient Education as Topic - organization & administration
Physician-Patient Relations
Program Development
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Self Concept
Time Perception
Trust - psychology
Abstract
Aboriginal people in Canada have poorer health than the rest of the population. Reasons for health disparities are many and include problems in communication between doctor and patient. The objective of this study was to understand doctor-patient communication in Aboriginal communities in order to design educational interventions for medical students based on the needs and experiences of patients.
Experiences of good and poor communication were studied by semi-structured interviews or focus groups with 22 Aboriginal community members, 2 community health representatives and 2 Aboriginal trainee physicians. Transcribed data were coded and subjected to thematic analysis.
Positive and negative experiences of communicating with physicians fell into three broad and interrelated themes: their histories as First Nations citizens; the extent to which the physician was trusted; time in the medical interview.
Aboriginal peoples' history affects their communication with physicians; barriers may be overcome when patients feel they have a voice and the time for it to be heard.
Physicians can improve communication with Aboriginal patients by learning about their history, building trust and giving time.
PubMed ID
16860965 View in PubMed
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Does school social capital modify socioeconomic inequality in mental health? A multi-level analysis in Danish schools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269780
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2015 Sep;140:35-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Line Nielsen
Vibeke Koushede
Mathilde Vinther-Larsen
Pernille Bendtsen
Annette Kjær Ersbøll
Pernille Due
Bjørn E Holstein
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2015 Sep;140:35-43
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Emotions
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Mental health
Occupations
Odds Ratio
Parents
Psychology, Adolescent - economics
Social capital
Socioeconomic Factors
Students - psychology
Trust - psychology
Abstract
It seems that social capital in the neighbourhood has the potential to reduce socioeconomic differences in mental health among adolescents. Whether school social capital is a buffer in the association between socioeconomic position and mental health among adolescents remains uncertain. The aim of this study is therefore to examine if the association between socioeconomic position and emotional symptoms among adolescents is modified by school social capital. The Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Methodology Development Study 2012 provided data on 3549 adolescents aged 11-15 in two municipalities in Denmark. Trust in the school class was used as an indicator of school social capital. Prevalence of daily emotional symptoms in each socioeconomic group measured by parents' occupational class was calculated for each of the three categories of school classes: school classes with high trust, moderate trust and low trust. Multilevel logistic regression analyses with parents' occupational class as the independent variable and daily emotional symptoms as the dependent variable were conducted stratified by level of trust in the school class. The prevalence of emotional symptoms was higher among students in school classes with low trust (12.9%) compared to school classes with high trust (7.2%) (p 
PubMed ID
26189012 View in PubMed
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The effect of trust and change in trust on self-rated health: a longitudinal study among aging people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153234
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2009 Nov-Dec;49(3):339-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
Olli Nummela
Tommi Sulander
Ossi Rahkonen
Antti Uutela
Author Affiliation
Health Promotion Unit, Department of Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention, National Public Health Institute (KTL), Mannerheimintie 166, FIN-00300 Helsinki, Finland. olli.nummela@ktl.fi
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2009 Nov-Dec;49(3):339-42
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging - psychology
Confidence Intervals
Female
Finland
Health Behavior
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Self Concept
Sex Factors
Trust - psychology
Abstract
This study examined whether trust predicted subsequent self-rated health over time at 3 years follow-up among aging people, and whether changes in trust were associated with self-rated health. Longitudinal, questionnaire-based data were collected from three age cohorts (born in 1926-1930, 1936-1940, and 1946-1950) living in the Province of P?ij?t-H?me, southern Finland. The response rate at the baseline in 2002 was 66% (n=2815). The follow-up was carried out in 2005, with 79% of eligible individuals participating (n=2216). Logistic regression analyses were used to derive the results. High trust was a strong predictor for good self-rated health at the follow-up. Adjusting for background variables, however, attenuated the association. In addition, good self-rated health was most common among men with sustained high trust, among women the association was somewhat weaker. Among men improvement in trust was associated with good self-rated health, but this correlation weakened after multiple adjustments. Thus, longitudinally trust is an important contributor to self-rated health among aging people. Moreover, improvement of trust but also the stability of high trust especially among men indicate better self-rated health. Trust has a positive effect on health and should therefore be seen as a significant element in health promotion.
PubMed ID
19136160 View in PubMed
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52 records – page 1 of 6.