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The 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic: the role of threat, coping, and media trust on vaccination intentions in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117388
Source
J Health Commun. 2013;18(3):278-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Sheena Aislinn Taha
Kimberly Matheson
Hymie Anisman
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. sheena_taha@carleton.ca
Source
J Health Commun. 2013;18(3):278-90
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - immunology
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Intention
Male
Mass Media
Pandemics - prevention & control
Public Opinion
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Trust
Vaccination - psychology
Abstract
Swine flu (H1N1) reached pandemic proportions in 2009, yet ambivalence was met concerning intentions to be vaccinated. The present investigation determined predictors of perceived H1N1 contraction risk and vaccination intentions among Canadian adults (N = 1,027) responding to an online questionnaire. The relatively low rate of vaccination intent (30.12%, and 34.99% being unsure of their intent) was related to a sense of invulnerability regarding illness contraction and symptom severity. Most individuals were skeptical that H1N1 would be widespread, believing that less than 10% of the population would contract H1N1. Yet, they also indicated that their attitudes would change once a single person they knew contracted the illness. Also, worry regarding H1N1 was related to self-contraction risk and odds of individuals seeking vaccination. Moreover, vaccination intent was related to the perception that the threat was not particularly great, mistrust of the media to provide accurate information regarding H1N1, and whether individuals endorsed problem-focused versus avoidant coping strategies. Given the role media plays in public perceptions related to a health crisis, trust in this outlet and credibility regarding the threat are necessary for adherence to recommended measures to minimize health risk.
PubMed ID
23301849 View in PubMed
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Achieving the 'perfect handoff' in patient transfers: building teamwork and trust.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122387
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2012 Jul;20(5):592-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Diana Clarke
Kim Werestiuk
Andrea Schoffner
Judy Gerard
Katie Swan
Bobbi Jackson
Betty Steeves
Shelley Probizanski
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. diana_clarke@umanitoba.ca
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2012 Jul;20(5):592-8
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Checklist
Communication
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Manitoba
Models, organizational
Models, Psychological
Nurse's Role
Nursing Evaluation Research
Patient care team
Patient transfer
Program Development
Trust
Abstract
To use the philosophy and methodology of Appreciative Inquiry (AI) in the investigation of unit to unit transfers to determine aspects which are working well and should be incorporated into standard practice.
Handoffs can result in threats to patient safety and an atmosphere of distrust and blaming among staff can be engendered. As the majority of handoffs go well, an alternative is to build on successful handoffs.
The AI methodology was used to discover what was currently working well in unit to unit transfers. The data from semi-structured interviews that were conducted with staff, patients, and family informed structural process improvements.
Themes extracted from the interviews focused on the situational variables necessary for the perfect transfer, the mode and content of transfer-related communication, and important factors in communication with the patient and family.
This project was successful in demonstrating the usefulness of AI as both a quality improvement methodology and a strategy to build trust among key stakeholders.
Giving staff members the opportunity to contribute positively to process improvements and share their ideas for innovation has the potential to highlight expertise and everyday accomplishments enhancing morale and reducing conflict.
PubMed ID
22823214 View in PubMed
Less detail

Addressing the emergence of pediatric vaccination concerns: recommendations from a Canadian policy analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169730
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Mar-Apr;97(2):139-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kumanan Wilson
Meredith Barakat
Edward Mills
Paul Ritvo
Heather Boon
Sunita Vohra
Alejandro R Jadad
Allison McGeer
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON. Kumanan.Wilson@uhn.on.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2006 Mar-Apr;97(2):139-41
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Attitude to Health
Canada
Child
Compensation and Redress
Health Policy
Humans
Immunization Programs
Liability, Legal - economics
Organizational Objectives
Pediatrics
Public Health Administration
Risk assessment
Trust
Vaccines - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Abstract
Ever since the advent of pediatric vaccination, individuals have expressed concerns about both its risks and benefits. These concerns have once again resurfaced among some segments of the population and could potentially undermine national vaccination programs. The views of the public, however, must be considered and respected in the formulation of vaccination policy. We have conducted an analysis of the pediatric vaccination "debate" in the Canadian context. We believe that there is common ground between those who support pediatric vaccination and those who are concerned about these programs. Based on our findings, we believe that the goal of public health authorities should be to maintain trust in vaccines by continuing to meet certain reciprocal responsibilities. To do so, we recommend the following: 1) increased investment in adverse event reporting systems; 2) request for proposals for consideration of a no-fault compensation program; 3) developing pre-emptive strategies to deal with potential vaccine risks; 4) further examination of mechanisms to improve communication between physicians and parents concerned about vaccination. All of these approaches would require additional investment in pediatric vaccination. However, such an investment is easy to justify given the benefits offered by pediatric vaccination and the ramifications of failing to maintain confidence in vaccination programs or missing a vaccine-related adverse event.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Public Health. 2006 Mar-Apr;97(2):86-916619991
PubMed ID
16620003 View in PubMed
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Adequate trust avails, mistaken trust matters: on the moral responsibility of doctors as proxies for patients' trust in biobank research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123635
Source
Bioethics. 2013 Nov;27(9):485-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Linus Johnsson
Gert Helgesson
Mats G Hansson
Stefan Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research Ethics & Bioethics at Uppsala UniversityStockholm Centre for Healthcare Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
Source
Bioethics. 2013 Nov;27(9):485-92
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Biological Specimen Banks
Clinical Competence
Culture
Humans
Morals
Motivation
Patient Selection - ethics
Physician-Patient Relations - ethics
Physicians
Questionnaires
Research
Sweden
Trust
Abstract
In Sweden, most patients are recruited into biobank research by non-researcher doctors. Patients' trust in doctors may therefore be important to their willingness to participate. We suggest a model of trust that makes sense of such transitions of trust between domains and distinguishes adequate trust from mistaken trust. The unique position of doctors implies, we argue, a Kantian imperfect duty to compensate for patients' mistaken trust. There are at least three kinds of mistaken trust, each of which requires a different set of countermeasures. First, trust is mistaken when necessary competence is lacking; the competence must be developed or the illusion dispelled. Second, trust is irrational whenever the patient is mistaken about his actual reasons for trusting. Care must therefore be taken to support the patient's reasoning and moral agency. Third, some patients inappropriately trust doctors to recommend only research that will benefit them directly. Such trust should be counteracted by nurturing a culture where patients expect to be asked occasionally to contribute to the common good.
PubMed ID
22681564 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' experiences of a two-year oral health intervention programme in two Swedish secondary schools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113112
Source
Int J Dent Hyg. 2013 Nov;11(4):244-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
E. Hedman
P. Gabre
D. Birkhed
M. Lepp
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Dentisty, Public Dental Health, Uppsala County Council, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Cariology, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Int J Dent Hyg. 2013 Nov;11(4):244-52
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Health
Cariostatic Agents - therapeutic use
Communication
Dental Hygienists
Dental Prophylaxis
Female
Fluorides, Topical - therapeutic use
Focus Groups
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Intervention Studies
Interviews as Topic
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Oral Health
Patient Participation
Peer Group
Personal Satisfaction
Professional-Patient Relations
School Dentistry
Self Concept
Sweden
Time Factors
Trust
Abstract
To describe adolescents' experiences of participating in a school-based oral health intervention programme for 2 years containing education about oral health and fluoride varnish treatment at the school clinic.
Sixteen adolescents aged 13-16 were interviewed in three focus group sessions. A phenomenographic approach was used for analysis.
The results are presented as three themes and seven descriptive categories. The three themes were 'Seeing the dental hygienist', 'Treatments at the dental hygiene clinic' and 'Education about oral health in class'. The results demonstrate satisfaction with the intervention, such as accessibility, time gain and expanding knowledge. On the other hand, feelings of vulnerability in the treatment sessions were expressed. The fluoride varnish treatment was given both positive and negative reviews. The contact between the participants and the dental hygienist was important, and the opportunity to ask questions about oral health issues was emphasized.
Both positive and negative experiences of the programme were found. Adolescence is a transitional period of life, and for this reason, it is important to create a good working alliance between students and the dental hygienist in future school-based oral health interventions.
PubMed ID
23763634 View in PubMed
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Adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease feel ambivalent towards their parents' concern for them.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87529
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2007 Dec;21(4):476-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Reichenberg Kjell
Lindfred Helene
Saalman Robert
Author Affiliation
The Nordic School of Public Health and The Vårdal Institute, Lund and Göteborg Universities, Göteborg, Sweden. kjell@reichenberg.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2007 Dec;21(4):476-81
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Anxiety - etiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Communication
Conflict (Psychology)
Cooperative Behavior
Fear - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - complications - prevention & control - psychology
Male
Models, Psychological
Nursing Methodology Research
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - psychology
Patient Education as Topic
Self Care - psychology
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Sweden
Trust
Abstract
This is a grounded theory study to identify concepts for describing how adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) respond to their parents' concern for them. Ten adolescent boys and seven girls were interviewed. In the analysis four main categories emerged: ambivalence, ability/inability, compliance/resistance and trust/distrust. We found ambivalence to be the most distinctive theme to appear in the way in which these young people described how they felt about their parents' response to their disease. The core category ambivalence was expressed as an oscillation between seeking close contact with one's parents or, sometimes, staving them off, one moment feeling anxiously dependent upon them or turning to them for protection and support and the next, trying to achieve a dialogue with them. The core category comprised three subcategories, ability/inability, compliance/resistance and trust/distrust. The clinical support for young individuals with IBD should include an awareness of the simultaneous existence of conflicting attitudes, reactions and emotions.
PubMed ID
18036010 View in PubMed
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Alternatives to project-specific consent for access to personal information for health research: what is the opinion of the Canadian public?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161798
Source
J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2007 Nov-Dec;14(6):706-12
Publication Type
Article
Author
Donald J Willison
Lisa Schwartz
Julia Abelson
Cathy Charles
Marilyn Swinton
David Northrup
Lehana Thabane
Author Affiliation
Centre for Evaluation of Medicines, St. Joseph's Healthcare, 105 Main Street East, P1, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. willison@mcmaster.ca
Source
J Am Med Inform Assoc. 2007 Nov-Dec;14(6):706-12
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Attitude to Health
Biomedical research
Canada
Confidentiality
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Medical Records
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Public Opinion
Trust
Abstract
This study sought to determine public opinion on alternatives to project-specific consent for use of their personal information for health research.
The authors conducted a fixed-response random-digit dialed telephone survey of 1,230 adults across Canada.
We measured attitudes toward privacy and health research; trust in different institutions to keep information confidential; and consent choice for research use of one's own health information involving medical record review, automated abstraction of information from the electronic medical record, and linking education or income with health data.
Support was strong for both health research and privacy protection. Studying communicable diseases and quality of health care had greatest support (85% to 89%). Trust was highest for data institutes, university researchers, hospitals, and disease foundations (78% to 80%). Four percent of respondents thought information from their paper medical record should not be used at all for research, 32% thought permission should be obtained for each use, 29% supported broad consent, 24% supported notification and opt out, and 11% felt no need for notification or consent. Opinions were more polarized for automated abstraction of data from the electronic medical record. Respondents were more willing to link education with health data than income.
Most of the public supported alternatives to study-specific consent, but few supported use without any notification or consent. Consent choices for research use of one's health information should be documented in the medical record. The challenge remains how best to elicit those choices and ensure that they are up-to-date.
Notes
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Cites: J Med Ethics. 2008 Apr;34(4):308-1418375687
Cites: Hosp Q. 2002 Summer;5(4):40-5, 212357571
Cites: BMJ. 2003 Feb 15;326(7385):37312586673
Cites: J Law Med Ethics. 2003 Fall;31(3):429-3314626550
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Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Apr 1;350(14):1414-2115070791
Cites: BMC Med Ethics. 2003 Jan 3;4:E112513704
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Cites: BMJ. 2006 May 6;332(7549):1068-7216648132
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Cites: BMJ. 2001 Mar 24;322(7288):73011264225
PubMed ID
17712084 View in PubMed
Less detail

An exploration of knowledge, attitudes and beliefs toward organ and tissue donation among the adult Haitian population living in the Greater Montreal area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113750
Source
Dynamics. 2013;24(1):12-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Wendy Sherry
Bernard Tremblay
Andréa Maria Laizner
Author Affiliation
McGill University Health Centre. wendy.sherry@muhc.mcgill.ca
Source
Dynamics. 2013;24(1):12-8
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cultural Competency
Decision Making
Female
Focus Groups
Haiti - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Nurse's Role
Qualitative Research
Quebec
Tissue and Organ Procurement
Trust
Abstract
The decision to donate organs and tissues has the potential to save and improve the quality of life of the transplant recipient. Previous studies suggest lack of information, fears, and prejudices have prevented some cultural minorities from participating in organ and tissue donation (OTD). There is scarce information about the views of those who might be approached for potential donation in the Haitian community. In fact, Haitians are the largest Black ethno-cultural community in Montreal and are at higher risk for needing a kidney transplant (Desilets & Sodjinou, 2006).
To learn what Haitians know and believe about OTD in order to enable registered nurses to develop culturally appropriate approaches and interventions.
A qualitative descriptive design was used to explore the knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes toward OTD among the adult Haitian population in the Montreal area. Focus groups were held with 24 members of the Haitian community and moderated by Haitian registered nurses who spoke French and Creole.
Group interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed for themes. Adult participants represented younger and older members of the community. They were from different socioeconomic backgrounds.
Knowledge about donation was influenced by the media, personal beliefs and experience, and level of trust in the health care system. Participants' recommendations on how to address OTD issues within the Haitian community were shaped by beliefs about wholeness, perceived need for donation and key persons who could influence decision-making behaviour.
The level of distrust with the health care system and the study consent process used with participants might have affected the degree of participation and disclosure in discussions.
PubMed ID
23691717 View in PubMed
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Applying indigenous community-based participatory research principles to partnership development in health disparities research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134004
Source
Fam Community Health. 2011 Jul-Sep;34(3):246-55
Publication Type
Article
Author
Suzanne Christopher
Robin Saha
Paul Lachapelle
Derek Jennings
Yoshiko Colclough
Clarice Cooper
Crescentia Cummins
Margaret J Eggers
Kris Fourstar
Kari Harris
Sandra W Kuntz
Victoria Lafromboise
Deborah Laveaux
Tracie McDonald
James Real Bird
Elizabeth Rink
Lennie Webster
Author Affiliation
Montana State University, Bozeman 59717, USA. suzanne@montana.edu
Source
Fam Community Health. 2011 Jul-Sep;34(3):246-55
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community-Based Participatory Research - methods
Community-Institutional Relations
Consumer Participation
Cooperative Behavior
Health Services Research
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American
Intervention Studies
Questionnaires
Trust
United States
Universities
Abstract
This case study of community and university research partnerships utilizes previously developed principles for conducting research in the context of Native American communities to consider how partners understand and apply the principles in developing community-based participatory research partnerships to reduce health disparities. The 7 partnership projects are coordinated through a National Institutes of Health-funded center and involve a variety of tribal members, including both health care professionals and lay persons and native and nonnative university researchers. This article provides detailed examples of how these principles are applied to the projects and discusses the overarching and interrelated emergent themes of sharing power and building trust.
PubMed ID
21633218 View in PubMed
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[A report of experiences from Finland: creating trust thanks to plants in nursing].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104697
Source
Krankenpfl Soins Infirm. 2014;107(2):26-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014

391 records – page 1 of 40.