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72 records – page 1 of 8.

Adaptation and failure of adaptation to extreme natural environments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5798
Source
Forensic Sci. 1975 Feb;5(1):81-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1975
Author
A W Sloan
Source
Forensic Sci. 1975 Feb;5(1):81-9
Date
Feb-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Anoxia
Arctic Regions
Body Temperature Regulation
Environment
Frostbite
Heat Exhaustion
Humans
Hypothermia
Tropical Climate
Abstract
Although the environmental stresses to which man is subjected on the ground are less than those commonly encountered in aviation or under water, they may still exceed an individual's powers of adaptation. Extremes of temperature, commonly encountered in the Arctic or the tropics, may occur in regions of normally temperate climate and lead to failure of temperature regulation, resulting in hypothermia, frostbite, heat exhaustion, or heat stroke. High mountains impose additional hazards due to high winds and lack of oxygen, and deep mines are dangerous work-places because of high temperature and humidity. Some physiological acclimatization occurs in extreme natural environments and the dangers may be reduced by appropriate clothing, diet and behaviour.
PubMed ID
1132866 View in PubMed
Less detail

Air-insulated clothing for specific naval purposes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57341
Source
Proc R Soc Med. 1969 Mar 3;62(3):277-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-3-1969
Author
J D Walters
Source
Proc R Soc Med. 1969 Mar 3;62(3):277-83
Date
Mar-3-1969
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clothing
Cold Climate
Humans
Hypothermia - prevention & control
Male
Naval Medicine
Steam
Tropical Climate
Ventilation
PubMed ID
5768358 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Jun 20;111(16):2006-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-1991
Author
E. Lien
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1991 Jun 20;111(16):2006-7
Date
Jun-20-1991
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brazil - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Ships
Travel
Tropical Climate
Typhoid Fever - epidemiology - transmission
PubMed ID
1866743 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Characteristics of the course of Botkin's disease in different climatic conditions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57145
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1972 Aug;8:48-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1972
Author
A N Mitropol'skii
L N Zhuk
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1972 Aug;8:48-50
Date
Aug-1972
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cold Climate
Hepatitis A - diagnosis
Humans
Male
Tropical Climate
PubMed ID
4638625 View in PubMed
Less detail

A climatology based on reanalysis of baroclinic developmental regions in the extratropical northern hemisphere.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95466
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2008 Dec;1146:235-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
de la Torre Laura
Nieto Raquel
Noguerol Marta
Añel Juan Antonio
Gimeno Luis
Author Affiliation
Facultade de Ciencias de Ourense, Universidade de Vigo, Ourense, Spain. ltr@uvigo.es
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2008 Dec;1146:235-55
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Atmospheric Pressure
Cyclones
Mediterranean Sea
Tropical Climate
Abstract
Regions of the occurrence of different phenomena related to the development of baroclinic disturbances are reviewed for the Northern Hemisphere extratropics, using National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research reanalysis data. The occurrence of height lows appears to be related to the orography near the earth's surface and with surface- and upper-air cyclogenesis in the upper troposphere. Over the cyclone tracks, the surface maxima appear to be trapped by land masses, whereas over the Mediterranean Sea they are located on the lee side of mountain ranges. The forcing terms of the geopotential tendency and omega equations mark the genesis (and, by the vorticity advection terms, the path) of the extratropical cyclones on the storm track. They occur mostly over the western coast of the oceans, beginning and having maxima on the lee side of the Rocky Mountains and the Tibetan Plateau. Their associated fronts form from the cold air coming from the continents and converging with the warm air over the Gulf and Kuroshio currents. Evident trends are found only for the Atlantic cyclone track (positive) and the Pacific cyclone track (negative) until the last decade when the tendency reverses. Over the southern Pacific, the number of fronts is lower during 1978-1997, coinciding with a period of strong El Ni?o Southern Oscillation episodes. This information is important for validating numerical models in order to predict changes associated with climate change and to study the behavior of extratropical cyclones and fronts.
PubMed ID
19076418 View in PubMed
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[Clinical and treatment characteristics of amebiasis in children in a hot climate]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41594
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1978 Sep-Oct;(5):28-9
Publication Type
Article

A combined Arctic-tropical climate pattern controlling the inter-annual climate variability of wintertime PM2.5 over the North China Plain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298557
Source
Environ Pollut. 2019 Feb; 245:607-615
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Kan Yi
Junfeng Liu
Xuejun Wang
Jianmin Ma
Jianying Hu
Yi Wan
Jiayu Xu
Haozhe Yang
Huazhen Liu
Songlin Xiang
Shu Tao
Author Affiliation
Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University, 100871, Beijing, People's Republic of China.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2019 Feb; 245:607-615
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution - analysis
Beijing
China
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Meteorology
Particulate Matter - analysis
Seasons
Tropical Climate
Abstract
In recent years, the Chinese government has made tremendous efforts to reduce the emissions of atmospheric pollutants throughout the country. An apparent improvement in air quality was observed in Beijing and its adjacent region during the winter of 2017/2018. However, caution should be taken in directly attributing this improvement to air control actions without taking the effects of climate variability into account. Here, we develop a statistical prediction model that can successfully predict the variability of wintertime PM2.5 concentrations observed over these regions. Our analysis indicates that the remarkable decrease in PM2.5 concentrations over the North China Plain (NCP) observed during the winter of 2017/2018 can be largely explained by changes in meteorological conditions. To clarify which climate factors control the inter-annual variability of wintertime PM2.5 pollution over the NCP, we further reconstructed a 30-year time series of wintertime PM2.5 levels over the NCP over the period of 1988-2017 using our statistical model. Through our analysis, we found that the combined Arctic-tropical climate effects related to the ENSO and Arctic warming controlled the inter-annual variability of wintertime PM2.5 over the NCP. Specifically, the rapid warming of the Barents-Kara Sea region enhances the Siberian High and thus plays an important role in improving the air quality over the NCP during the 2017/2018 wintertime. These results help us understand the role of climate variability in modulating air quality, especially its contributions to the winter of 2017/2018. These results may assist in the evaluation of current air control actions and the revision of relevant policy for the future, which are urgently needed for China.
PubMed ID
30476890 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Comparative ethnic studies on the practical life of native peoples against cold and heat]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4406
Source
Nippon Seirigaku Zasshi. 1968;30(3):129-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
1968

72 records – page 1 of 8.