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A 1-year randomized study to evaluate the effects of a dose reduction in oral contraceptives on lipids and carbohydrate metabolism: 20 microg ethinyl estradiol combined with 100 microg levonorgestrel.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176202
Source
Contraception. 2005 Feb;71(2):111-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Sven O Skouby
Jan Endrikat
Bernd Düsterberg
Werner Schmidt
Christoph Gerlinger
Jens Wessel
Henri Goldstein
Joergen Jespersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Frederiksberg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, DK 2000 Copenhagen F, Denmark. sven.skouby@fh.hosp.dk
Source
Contraception. 2005 Feb;71(2):111-7
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - metabolism
C-Peptide - blood
Carbohydrate Metabolism - drug effects
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Contraceptive Agents, Female - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Contraceptives, Oral, Combined - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Denmark
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Ethinyl Estradiol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Fatty Acids, Nonesterified - blood
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Levonorgestrel - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Lipid Metabolism - drug effects
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
To evaluate the impact on lipid and carbohydrate variables of a combined one-third ethinyl estradiol (EE)/levonorgestrel (LNG) dose reduction in oral contraceptives.
In an open-label, randomized study, a dose-reduced oral contraceptive containing 20 microg EE and 100 microg LNG (20 EE/100 LNG) was compared with a reference preparation containing 30 microg EE and 150 microg LNG (30 EE/150 LNG). One-year data from 48 volunteers were obtained.
We found a decrease of HDL2 cholesterol and increases of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and total triglycerides in both treatment groups from baseline to the 13th treatment cycle. Although for four of six variables, the changes in the 20 EE group were lower compared with the 30 EE group, none of the differences between the two treatments were statistically significant. The median values for the fasting levels of insulin, C-peptide and free fatty acids slightly increased or remained unchanged while the fasting glucose levels slightly decreased after 13 treatment cycles. While the glucose area under the curve (AUC) (0-3 h) was similar in both groups during the OGTT, the insulin AUC(0-3 h) was less increased in the 20 EE/100 LNG group compared with the 30 EE/150 LNG group. None of the differences between the treatment groups for any of the carbohydrate metabolism variables were statistically significant at any time point. Both study treatments were safe and well tolerated by the volunteers.
Similar effects on the lipid and carbohydrate profiles were found for both preparations. The balanced one-third EE dose reduction in this new oral contraceptive caused slightly lower, but insignificant, changes in the lipid and carbohydrate variables compared with the reference treatment.
PubMed ID
15707560 View in PubMed
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The 21-year follow-up of the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study: risk factor levels, secular trends and east-west difference.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180902
Source
J Intern Med. 2004 Apr;255(4):457-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
M. Juonala
J S A Viikari
N. Hutri-Kähönen
M. Pietikäinen
E. Jokinen
L. Taittonen
J. Marniemi
T. Rönnemaa
O T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
The Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
Source
J Intern Med. 2004 Apr;255(4):457-68
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Patient Dropouts
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study is an on-going multicentre study of atherosclerosis precursors in Finnish children and young adults. We have collected risk factor data in the 21-year follow-up performed in 2001. The aims of this analysis were to examine the levels, secular trends and east-west difference in risk factors amongst young adults.
Population based follow-up study.
A total of 2283 participants aged 24-39 years in 2001 (63.5% of the original cohort).
Levels of serum lipids, apolipoproteins, blood pressure and smoking.
The mean serum total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations in 24-39-year-old adults were 5.16, 3.27, 1.29 and 1.34 mmol L(-1), respectively. Total cholesterol (5.21 vs. 5.12 mmol L(-1), P = 0.046), HDL cholesterol (1.31 vs. 1.28 mmol L(-1), P = 0.027), systolic blood pressure (118 vs. 115 mmHg, P
PubMed ID
15049880 View in PubMed
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Absolute and relative accelerometer thresholds for determining the association between physical activity and metabolic syndrome in the older adults: The Generation-100 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287938
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2017 05 16;17(1):109
Publication Type
Article
Date
05-16-2017
Author
Nina Zisko
Javaid Nauman
Silvana Bucher Sandbakk
Nils Petter Aspvik
Øyvind Salvesen
Trude Carlsen
Hallgeir Viken
Jan Erik Ingebrigtsen
Ulrik Wisløff
Dorthe Stensvold
Source
BMC Geriatr. 2017 05 16;17(1):109
Date
05-16-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry - methods
Aged
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Exercise - physiology
Female
Humans
Hypertension - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Male
Metabolic Syndrome - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Motor Activity
Norway - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
When assessing population adherence to physical activity (PA) recommendation using accelerometers, absolute intensity threshold definition is applied despite having limited validity in those with low cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), who are unable to reach them (e.g older adults). Thus, PA thresholds relative to CRF may be an alternative approach. We compared the proportion of the older adults meeting the PA recommendation when PA is assessed using absolute versus sex-and-CRF-adjusted (relative) accelerometer thresholds and determined the association between relative versus absolute moderate PA (MPA), vigorous PA (VPA) and moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) and metabolic syndrome (MetS).
Cross-sectional study of 509 men and 567 women aged 70-77. Accelerometer assessed MPA, VPA and MVPA were analyzed using absolute and relative thresholds. Meeting the PA-recommendation was defined as amounting =150 min/week in MPA/MVPA or 75 min/week in VPA, respectively. CRF was directly measured as peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak). MetS was defined as 3 or more of the following: elevated waist circumference, fasting glucose, hypertension, triglycerides, decreased HDL-cholesterol or diabetes, dyslipidemia or hypertension medication.
Higher proportion of the population met the recommendation when PA was assessed with relative compared to absolute thresholds: VPA (72.4% vs. 1.7%) and MVPA (75.2% vs. 33.8%). Logistic regression analysis revealed that men and women not meeting the relative-MVPA or VPA recommendation had higher likelihood of MetS (Men: MVPA OR: 1.59, 95% CI: 1.08-2.33.
1.81, 95%CI: 1.23-2.67 and Women: MVPA OR: 2.12, 95% CI: 1.36-3.31; VPA OR: 1.95, 95% CI: 1.29-2.95), compared to men and women meeting the relative MVPA or VPA recommendation. There was no significant association between MetS and absolute MVPA, MPA or VPA recommendations in the fully adjusted model.
The association between meeting/not meeting the PA recommendation and MetS differed with method. Not meeting relative MVPA and VPA recommendation was associated with significantly higher likelihood for presence of MetS. Since relative intensity is part of the current PA recommendation, it should be considered when assessing population PA and associated health risks in the older adults.
Clinical Trial Registration: NCT01931111 (Date of trial registration: July 19, 2013).
Notes
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PubMed ID
28511695 View in PubMed
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Acception of cholesterol from cells in men of the Russian population correlates with concentration of pre-beta1 high-density lipoproteins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182095
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2003 Oct;136(4):366-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
A P Serdyuk
K. Lasselin
G. Castro
O A Litinskaya
G. Frushar
V A Metel'skaya
Author Affiliation
Department of Metabolic Disorders, State Research Center for Preventive Medicine, Russian Ministry of Health, Moscow. vicamet@orc.ru
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2003 Oct;136(4):366-8
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Apolipoprotein A-I - blood
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - chemistry
Cell Line, Tumor
Chemical Fractionation
Cholesterol - blood - chemistry - metabolism
Cholesterol, HDL - blood - chemistry - isolation & purification
Electrophoresis, Gel, Two-Dimensional
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Phosphatidylcholine-Sterol O-Acyltransferase - blood
Rats
Russia - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
We analyzed subfraction composition of HDL and cholesterol-acceptor properties of the plasma in Russian men with high and low HDL cholesterol. HDL were subfractionated by two-dimensional electrophoresis in agarose-polyacrylamide gel. The content of pre-beta1 HDL increased in individuals with high concentration of HDL cholesterol and strictly correlated with acception of cellular cholesterol in both groups.
PubMed ID
14714084 View in PubMed
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Activated and total coagulation factor VII, and fibrinogen in coronary artery disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54392
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 1998;32(2):87-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
R. Danielsen
P T Onundarson
H. Thors
B. Vidarsson
J H Morrissey
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Landspítalinn, University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 1998;32(2):87-95
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angina Pectoris - metabolism
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Arteriosclerosis - metabolism
Coronary Disease - diagnosis - metabolism - surgery
Coronary Thrombosis - metabolism
Disease Progression
Factor VII - biosynthesis
Factor VIIa - biosynthesis
Female
Fibrinogen - biosynthesis
Heart Catheterization
Humans
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - metabolism
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Risk assessment
Sex Characteristics
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Fibrinogen (FBG) and total coagulation factor VII (FVIIc) concentrations are higher in those patients with coronary artery disease who are at increased future risk of acute ischemic events. The relationship between activated factor VII (FVIIa) and cardiovascular events, however, has not been intensively studied. Data were collected from 401 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography because of suspected coronary artery disease. Conventional risk factors FVIIc, FVIIa and FBG were assessed in relation to the severity of coronary artery disease, left ventricular ejection fraction, and previous clinical events. A strong positive correlation was found between FVIIa and FVIIc (p
PubMed ID
9636964 View in PubMed
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Adipose co-expression networks across Finns and Mexicans identify novel triglyceride-associated genes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118360
Source
BMC Med Genomics. 2012;5:61
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Blake E Haas
Steve Horvath
Kirsi H Pietiläinen
Rita M Cantor
Elina Nikkola
Daphna Weissglas-Volkov
Aila Rissanen
Mete Civelek
Ivette Cruz-Bautista
Laura Riba
Johanna Kuusisto
Jaakko Kaprio
Teresa Tusie-Luna
Markku Laakso
Carlos A Aguilar-Salinas
Päivi Pajukanta
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Genetics, Gonda Center, Los Angeles, California, 90095-7088, USA.
Source
BMC Med Genomics. 2012;5:61
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Case-Control Studies
Finland
Gene Expression Profiling
Gene Expression Regulation
Gene Regulatory Networks - genetics
Genetic Loci - genetics
Genome-Wide Association Study
Humans
Immunity - genetics
Inflammation - blood - genetics
Mexico
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Triglycerides - blood - genetics
Twins - genetics
Abstract
High serum triglyceride (TG) levels is an established risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). Fat is stored in the form of TGs in human adipose tissue. We hypothesized that gene co-expression networks in human adipose tissue may be correlated with serum TG levels and help reveal novel genes involved in TG regulation.
Gene co-expression networks were constructed from two Finnish and one Mexican study sample using the blockwiseModules R function in Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA). Overlap between TG-associated networks from each of the three study samples were calculated using a Fisher's Exact test. Gene ontology was used to determine known pathways enriched in each TG-associated network.
We measured gene expression in adipose samples from two Finnish and one Mexican study sample. In each study sample, we observed a gene co-expression network that was significantly associated with serum TG levels. The TG modules observed in Finns and Mexicans significantly overlapped and shared 34 genes. Seven of the 34 genes (ARHGAP30, CCR1, CXCL16, FERMT3, HCST, RNASET2, SELPG) were identified as the key hub genes of all three TG modules. Furthermore, two of the 34 genes (ARHGAP9, LST1) reside in previous TG GWAS regions, suggesting them as the regional candidates underlying the GWAS signals.
This study presents a novel adipose gene co-expression network with 34 genes significantly correlated with serum TG across populations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23217153 View in PubMed
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Adiposity measures as indicators of metabolic risk factors in adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98426
Source
Obes Facts. 2009;2(5):294-301
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Martin Neovius
Sophia M Rossner
Karin Vågstrand
Yvonne Linné von Hausswolff-Juhlin
Johan Hoffstedt
Ulf Ekelund
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. martin.neovius@ki.se
Source
Obes Facts. 2009;2(5):294-301
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Body Composition
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Insulin - blood
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology - metabolism
Obesity - epidemiology - metabolism
Prevalence
ROC Curve
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Waist Circumference
Abstract
AIM: To examine the relation between adiposity assessment methods (percentage body fat (%BF), BMI, and waist circumference (WC)) and individual metabolic risk factors (f-insulin, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides) and a combined measure of metabolic risk. METHODS: Crosssectional study of 300 males (BMI 20.8 +/- 3.0 kg/m(2)) and females (BMI 21.3 +/- 2.9 kg/m(2)) 17 years of age. F-insulin and components of the metabolic syndrome defined by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) were used as metabolic risk indicators, with samples stratified into BMI, %BF, and WC groups, respectively. Diagnostic accuracy was expressed as the area under the ROC curve (AUC). RESULTS: In males, diagnostic accuracy for HDL and f-insulin was poor to fair for BMI (AUC 0.70, p = 0.001; 0.60, p = 0.22), WC (0.68, p = 0.003; 0.63, p = 0.11), and %BF (0.65, p = 0.009; 0.66, p = 0.04). The diagnostic accuracy for triglycerides was greater for all three measures (BMI 0.92, WC 0.95, %BF 0.87; all p or =2 metabolic risk factors (AUCs 0.76-0.91, p
PubMed ID
20057196 View in PubMed
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Adolescent cholesterol metabolism predicts coronary risk factors at middle age: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157567
Source
Transl Res. 2008 May;151(5):260-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Tatu A Miettinen
Helena Gylling
Olli T Raitakari
Maarit Hallikainen
Jorma Viikari
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Internal Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. tatu.a.miettinen@helsinki.fi
Source
Transl Res. 2008 May;151(5):260-6
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - etiology
Child
Cholesterol - blood - metabolism
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Risk factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Atherosclerosis develops at an early age. We studied whether cholesterol metabolism in adolescence is related to coronary risk factors later during the adult years. A random population sample of 12-year-old (n=162), 15-year-old (n=158), and 18-year-old (n=148) boys who participated in the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study was studied for major coronary risk factors in 1980 and 2001. These values were related to noncholesterol sterols and their quartiles in 1980 (ie, markers of cholesterol absorption and synthesis). In 1980, serum triglycerides, body mass index (BMI), and systolic blood pressure were lower and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was higher in high absorbers versus low absorbers. This difference, except HDL cholesterol, was maintained after follow-up (eg, in 2001, systolic blood pressure was 123+/-1 mm Hg in low absorbers vs 119+/-1 mm Hg in high absorbers, P
PubMed ID
18433708 View in PubMed
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Adult family members and their resemblance of coronary heart disease risk factors: the Cardiovascular Disease Study in Finnmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54463
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 1997 Sep;13(6):623-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
T. Brenn
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. tormod@ism.uit.no
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 1997 Sep;13(6):623-30
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood pressure
Chi-Square Distribution
Cholesterol - blood
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Family Characteristics
Family Health
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Spouses
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Coronary heart disease tends to run in families, and the familial resemblance of major risk factors for the disease was examined among various types of adult family members. Family units were assembled from a total of 4,738 men and women who took part in a cross sectional health survey in four Norwegian municipalities where all inhabitants between 20 and 52 years of age were invited. After adjusting for age and other confounders, correlation coefficients were derived as a measure of the degree of resemblance. Viewed across all types of investigated familial relationships, similarity was found to be stronger for total cholesterol than for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, and also stronger for systolic than for diastolic blood pressure. Between husbands and wives (3,060 subjects), correlations were small (between 0.02 and 0.06), except for 0.11 for total cholesterol. Lipid and blood pressure correlations ranged from 0.13 to 0.27 for parents and their offspring (471 subjects, p
PubMed ID
9324207 View in PubMed
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Aerobic fitness thresholds to define poor cardiometabolic health in children and youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299130
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2019 Feb; 29(2):240-250
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Eivind Aadland
Sigmund Alfred Anderssen
Lars Bo Andersen
Geir Kåre Resaland
Elin Kolle
Jostein Steene-Johannessen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sport, Food and Natural Sciences, Faculty of Education, Arts and Sports, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Sogndal, Norway.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2019 Feb; 29(2):240-250
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anthropometry
Blood pressure
Cardiorespiratory fitness
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Oxygen consumption
Reference Values
Risk factors
Triglycerides - blood
Waist Circumference
Abstract
Aerobic fitness is an apparent candidate for screening children and youth for poor cardiometabolic health and future risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Yet, age- and sex-specific cut points for children and youth determined using a maximal protocol and directly measured peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak ) does not exist. We used a nationally representative sample of 1462 Norwegian children and youth (788 boys and 674 girls aged 8.7-10.4 years and 14.7-16.7 years) who in 2005-2006 performed a maximal cycle ergometer test with direct measurement of VO2peak , along with measurement of several other risk factors for CVD (systolic blood pressure, waist circumference:height ratio, total:high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, triglycerides, Homeostasis Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance). Based on the proportion of children having clustering (least favorable quartile) of 6 (1.6%), =5 (5.2%), and =4 (10.6%) CVD risk factors, we established the 2nd, 5th, and 10th percentile cut points for VO2peak (mL/kg/min) for children and youth aged 8-18 years. Classification accuracy was determined using the Kappa coefficient (k), sensitivity, and specificity. For boys, the 2nd, 5th, and 10th percentile VO2peak cut points were 33.6-36.4, 36.3-39.8, and 38.7-43.0 mL/kg/min, respectively. For girls, the corresponding cut points were 29.7-29.1, 32.4-31.4, and 34.8-33.5 mL/kg/min Together with BMI, but without more invasive measures of traditional risk factors for CVD, these cut points can be used to screen schoolchildren for poor cardiometabolic health with moderate discriminating ability (k = 0.53).
PubMed ID
30375665 View in PubMed
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932 records – page 1 of 94.