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96 records – page 1 of 10.

Source
Chandler, San Francisco, CA. Pages 61-84, 175-201.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1967
Author
Oswalt, W.H.
Author Affiliation
University of California (Los Angeles)
Source
Chandler, San Francisco, CA. Pages 61-84, 175-201.
Date
1967
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Blood groups, general
Cold adaptation
Basal metabolic rate
Cholesterol
Cutaneous pain threshold
Birth rate
Fertility
Diarrhea
Anemia
Arthritis
Hydatid disease, general
Hepatitis A
Trichinosis
Mortality rates
Shamanic healing
Pregnancy
Infanticide
Child care
Facial ornamentation
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 96. UAA/APU Consortium, Alaskana Collection E99.E7 O783 1967. UAF - Rasmuson Library E99.E7 O783 ALASKA.
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An outbreak of trichinellosis due to consumption of bear meat infected with Trichinella nativa, in 2 northern Saskatchewan communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30741
Source
J Infect Dis. 2003 Sep 15;188(6):835-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2003
Author
Roberta S Schellenberg
Ben J K Tan
James D Irvine
Donna R Stockdale
Alvin A Gajadhar
Bouchra Serhir
Juri Botha
Cheryl A Armstrong
Shirley A Woods
Joseph M Blondeau
Tammy L McNab
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. r.schellenberg@shaw.ca.
Source
J Infect Dis. 2003 Sep 15;188(6):835-43
Date
Sep-15-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Albendazole - therapeutic use
Animals
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - therapeutic use
Antinematodal Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Food Contamination
Humans
Infant
Male
Meat - parasitology
Mebendazole - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Prednisone - therapeutic use
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Parasitic - drug therapy - epidemiology - parasitology
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Trichinella - growth & development - isolation & purification
Trichinosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - parasitology
Ursidae - parasitology
Abstract
In June 2000, bear meat infected with Trichinella nativa was consumed by 78 individuals in 2 northern Saskatchewan communities. Interviews and blood collections were performed on exposed individuals at the onset of the outbreak and 7 weeks later. All exposed individuals were treated with mebendazole or albendazole, and symptomatic patients received prednisone. Confirmed cases were more likely to have consumed dried meat, rather than boiled meat (P
PubMed ID
12964114 View in PubMed
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[An outbreak of trichinosis in Zaporozhe]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44906
Source
Sov Med. 1966 Sep;29(9):111-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1966

Arctic trichinosis. Communicable Disease Bulletin 11, for week ending June 6, 1980.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29
Source
Page 91 in Communicable Disease Bulletins 1975-1981.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Source
Page 91 in Communicable Disease Bulletins 1975-1981.
Date
1982
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Barrow
Hooper Bay
Kivalina
Point Hope
Trichinosis
Trichinella spiralis
Diet, traditional
Zoonosis
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2088.
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Arctic trichinosis presenting as prolonged diarrhea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2577
Source
Gastoenterology. 1986 Oct; 91(4):938-946.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
J. Viallet
J D MacLean
C A Goresky
M. Staudt
G. Routhier
C. Law
Author Affiliation
McGill University
Source
Gastoenterology. 1986 Oct; 91(4):938-946.
Date
1986
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Salluit
Trichinosis
Diet, traditional
Epidemics
Trichinella spiralis
Adult
Animals
Arctic Regions
Diarrhea - etiology
Disease Outbreaks - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Inuits
Male
Meat
Middle Aged
Pinnipedia - parasitology
Time Factors
Trichinellosis - complications - epidemiology - transmission
Walruses - parasitology
Abstract
We describe an outbreak of trichinosis after the consumption of raw walrus meat in 10 Inuit inhabitants of a northern community. During the presentation of the illness, diarrhea was found in all subjects and was the dominant symptom in 8 of the 10 cases. Myalgia (60%) and muscle weakness (50%) were much less prominent complaints. The diarrhea was characteristically prolonged, lasting up to 14 wk (average 5.8 wk), as opposed to comparatively short episodes of myalgia (average 5.4 days) and muscle weakness (average 4.5 days). Prolonged diarrhea with little or no muscle symptomatology in an epidemic form represents a previously unrecognized clinical presentation of trichinosis. It remains to be determined whether this new clinical presentation is related to variant biological behavior of arctic Trichinella, to previous exposure to the parasite, or to other factors.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2121.
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Arctic trichinosis: Two Alaskan outbreaks from walrus meat

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1566
Source
Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1979 Jan;139(1):102-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1979
Author
Margolis, HS
Middaugh, JP
Burgess, RD
Author Affiliation
U.S. Centers for Disease Control
Source
Journal of Infectious Diseases. 1979 Jan;139(1):102-105
Date
Jan-1979
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Barrow
Diet, traditional
Epidemics
Trichinella spiralis
Trichinosis
Zoonosis
Alaska
Animals
Disease Outbreaks
Disease Reservoirs
Eosinophilia - complications
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Flocculation Tests
Humans
Male
Pinnipedia - parasitology
Prednisone - therapeutic use
Thiabendazole - therapeutic use
Trichinellosis - diagnosis - drug therapy - transmission
Walruses - parasitology
Abstract
The arctic form of Trichinella spiralis that infects terrestrial and marine mammals is of importance in public health because persons living in arctic regions still depend on wild animals for economic subsistence. In 1975, an extended common-source epidemic of trichinosis attributed to consumption of walrus meat involved 29 persons in Barrow, Alaska. Of those persons eating this meat, 64% became ill, and the rate of infection of persons eating meat prepared with little or no cooking was four times as great as that of persons eating cooked meat. One year later a second outbreak occurred when a family ate partially cooked meat from an infected walrus. Clinical illness differed little from the disease acquired in temperature climates; however, only 70% had a positive bentonite flocculation titer, whereas 96% had eosinophilia. These epidemics of trichinosis are the first reported in Alaska to be associated with the consumption of walrus meat.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2110.
PubMed ID
571446 View in PubMed
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Source
Alaska Today. 12:28-29.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984-85
Author
Wells, V.
Source
Alaska Today. 12:28-29.
Date
1984-85
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Barrow
Frozen body
Trauma
Anthracosis
Pneumonia
Pleurisy
Trichinosis
Blood poisoning
Malnutrition
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 218.
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Source
Alaska's Health. 4:5-6.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1946
Author
Williams, R.B.
Author Affiliation
Alaska Department of Health
Source
Alaska's Health. 4:5-6.
Date
1946
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Trichinosis
Zoonosis
Diet, traditional
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2122.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 908.
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96 records – page 1 of 10.