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305 records – page 1 of 31.

Abnormal regulation of the LDL-R and HMG CoA reductase genes in subjects with familial hypercholesterolemia with the "French Canadian mutation".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211598
Source
Atherosclerosis. 1996 Jul;124(1):103-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
L. Yu
S. Qiu
J. Genest
Author Affiliation
Cardiovascular Genetics Laboratory, Clinical Research Institute of Montréal, Québec Canada.
Source
Atherosclerosis. 1996 Jul;124(1):103-17
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anticholesteremic Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Cells, Cultured
Enzyme Induction
Enzyme Inhibitors - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Ethnic Groups - genetics
Female
Fibroblasts - metabolism
France - ethnology
Gene Expression Regulation - drug effects
Haploidy
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl CoA Reductases - genetics
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Hyperlipoproteinemia Type II - drug therapy - ethnology - genetics
Lipoproteins, LDL - metabolism
Lovastatin - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Male
Prevalence
RNA, Messenger - biosynthesis - genetics
Receptors, LDL - genetics - metabolism
Sequence Deletion
Transcription, Genetic
Treatment Failure
Abstract
Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is seen with high frequency in the province of Québec, Canada. A large deletion (> 10 kb) of the 5'-end of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) gene is the major mutation of the LDL-R in FH subjects in Québec (approximately 60% of FH subjects). No mRNA is produced from the allele bearing the mutation, and cellular cholesterol obtained by receptor-mediated endocytosis is under the control of the non-deletion allele. We have previously reported that some patients with the 10-kb deletion (approximately 9%) fail to respond to the hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG CoA reductase) inhibitor class of medications. We studied mRNA levels of the LDL-R and HMG CoA reductase genes in response to the HMG CoA reductase inhibitor lovastatin in a time- and dose-dependent fashion in cultured human skin fibroblasts and we devised an in vitro model to study the response to drug therapy in subjects with FH. We determined mRNA levels by RNase protection assay in skin fibroblasts obtained from controls (n = 3) and FH subjects with the > 10-kb deletion (responders, n = 3; non responders, n = 3; to drug therapy). We measured 125I-LDL binding on skin fibroblasts grown in the presence of lipoprotein-deficient serum with or without 1 microM lovastatin, using 10 micrograms/mL of 125I-LDL protein. Control subjects exhibited coordinate regulation of the LDL-R and HMG CoA reductase genes in response to lovastatin, 0.1-25 microM, for 0-24 h. Correlation coefficients between mRNA levels of both genes were > 0.9 in controls and FH subjects. However, by linear regression analysis, the corresponding slopes for the correlation between both genes were 0.98 (controls), 3.36 and 3.63 (FH responders and non-responders), indicating a pattern of dissociated but still coordinate regulation in FH subjects. The magnitude of increase of mRNA levels of the LDL-R gene was approximately five-fold over LPDS in controls, two-fold in FH responders and two-fold in non-responders. Binding studies using 125I-LDL reveal that a control subject and all responders had a 2-2.5-fold increase in binding to cell surface receptors but two out of three FH non-responders showed no increase in binding in response to 1 microM lovastatin. The LDL-R and HMG CoA reductase genes are expressed in coordinate regulation in fibroblasts from subjects with FH due to the > 10-kb deletion, but with a proportionately greater up-regulation of the HMG CoA reductase gene. Some subjects, with FH caused by the > 10-kb deletion of the LDL-R gene, who fail to respond to HMG CoA reductase inhibitors have abnormal LDL receptor binding activity at the cell surface in response to lovastatin in vitro.
PubMed ID
8800498 View in PubMed
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Acute otitis media in children younger than 2 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107561
Source
JAMA Pediatr. 2013 Dec;167(12):1171-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Alejandro Hoberman
Aino Ruohola
Nader Shaikh
Paula A Tähtinen
Jack L Paradise
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Source
JAMA Pediatr. 2013 Dec;167(12):1171-2
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Amoxicillin-Potassium Clavulanate Combination - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Finland
Humans
Infant
Otitis Media - drug therapy
Pennsylvania
Treatment Failure
Treatment Outcome
PubMed ID
23999574 View in PubMed
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[Acute tubular necrosis in patients after kidney transplantation: associated factors and impact on functional survival of the graft].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216261
Source
Ann Chir. 1995;49(8):674-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
E. Bergeron
M. Aboujaoudé
G. Saint-Louis
J. Corman
C. Smeeters
P. Daloze
Author Affiliation
Unité de Transplantation, Hôpital Notre-Dame, Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
Ann Chir. 1995;49(8):674-9
Date
1995
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Diabetes Mellitus - surgery
Female
Glomerulonephritis - surgery
Graft Rejection - epidemiology - etiology
Graft Survival
Humans
Incidence
Kidney Transplantation - adverse effects - mortality
Kidney Tubular Necrosis, Acute - etiology - mortality
Male
Nephritis, Interstitial - surgery
Postoperative Complications
Treatment Failure
Abstract
Acute tubular necrosis (ATN) represents a serious problem in kidney transplantation. We have reviewed the causes and effects of ATN on kidney transplant patients treated in our hospital between June 1981 and December 1992. We analyzed 359 consecutive kidney transplants performed in 338 patients (213 male and 125 female). There were 311 first grafts. The actuarial functional graft survival (AFGS) was 85% at 1 year and 58.2% at 10 years. The incidence of long-term chronic rejection, the 1-year creatinine blood level (CBL) and the AFGS are summarized: [table: see text] The donor age and the PRA level were significantly correlated with ATN occurrence. ATN after transplantation was associated with a poorer function and survival of the kidney graft. Better donor and patient selection could decrease the occurrence of ATN, thus improving the graft outcome.
PubMed ID
8561419 View in PubMed
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Adalimumab (Humira) restores clinical response in patients with secondary loss of efficacy from infliximab (Remicade) or etanercept (Enbrel): results from the STURE registry at Karolinska University Hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13711
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2005 Sep-Oct;34(5):353-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
M C Wick
S. Ernestam
S. Lindblad
J. Bratt
L. Klareskog
R F van Vollenhoven
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2005 Sep-Oct;34(5):353-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Monoclonal - therapeutic use
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Psoriatic - drug therapy
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy
Drug resistance
Humans
Immunoglobulin G - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor - therapeutic use
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Treatment Failure
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha - antagonists & inhibitors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To determine whether the tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) antagonist adalimumab (Humira) can be efficacious after secondary loss of efficacy (i.e. loss of clinical response in patients who had initially demonstrated clinical response) to infliximab (Remicade) or etanercept (Enbrel). PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied 36 patients from the Stockholm TNF-alpha follow-up registry (STURE) who received adalimumab after secondary loss of efficacy to infliximab (group A, n = 27) or etanercept (group B, n = 9), and 26 patients who were started on adalimumab as the first TNF-alpha antagonist (group C). RESULTS: In group A, the baseline disease activity score 28 (DAS28) at infliximab institution was 5.5+/-0.2. During infliximab treatment, the mean best DAS28 was 3.7+/-0.2 (p
PubMed ID
16234182 View in PubMed
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Adenoidectomy versus chemoprophylaxis and placebo for recurrent acute otitis media in children aged under 2 years: randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30523
Source
BMJ. 2004 Feb 28;328(7438):487
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-2004
Author
Petri Koivunen
Matti Uhari
Jukka Luotonen
Aila Kristo
Risto Raski
Tytti Pokka
Olli-Pekka Alho
Author Affiliation
University of Oulu, PO Box 5000, FIN-90014, Finland. petri.koivunen@ppshp.fi
Source
BMJ. 2004 Feb 28;328(7438):487
Date
Feb-28-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoidectomy - methods
Anti-Infective Agents - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Ear Ventilation - methods
Otitis Media - prevention & control - surgery
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sulfisoxazole - therapeutic use
Treatment Failure
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of adenoidectomy compared with long term chemoprophylaxis and placebo in the prevention of recurrent acute otitis media in children aged between 10 months and 2 years. DESIGN: Randomised, double blind, controlled trial. SETTING: Oulu University Hospital, a tertiary centre in Finland. PARTICIPANTS: 180 children aged 10 months to 2 years with recurrent acute otitis media. INTERVENTION: Adenoidectomy, sulfafurazole (sulphisoxazole) 50 mg/kg body weight, given once a day for six months or placebo. Follow up lasted for two years, during which time all symptoms and episodes of acute otitis media were recorded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Intervention failure (two episodes in two months or three in six months or persistent effusion) during follow up, number of episodes of acute otitis media, number of visits to a doctor because of any infection, and antibiotic prescriptions Number of prescriptions, and days with symptoms of respiratory infection. RESULTS: Compared with placebo, interventions failed during both the first six months and the rest of the follow up period of 24 months similarly in the adenoidectomy and chemoprophylaxis groups (at six months the differences in risk were 10% (95% confidence interval -9% to 29%) and 18% (-2% to 38%), respectively). No significant differences were observed between the groups in the numbers of episodes of acute otitis media, visits to a doctor, antibiotic prescriptions, and days with symptoms of respiratory infection. CONCLUSIONS: Adenoidectomy, as the first surgical treatment of children aged 10 to 24 months with recurrent acute otitis media, is not effective in preventing further episodes. It cannot be recommended as the primary method of prophylaxis.
PubMed ID
14769785 View in PubMed
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Adherence to Antihypertensive Therapy and Elevated Blood Pressure: Should We Consider the Use of Multiple Medications?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273360
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0137451
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Khedidja Hedna
Katja M Hakkarainen
Hanna Gyllensten
Anna K Jönsson
Karolina Andersson Sundell
Max Petzold
Staffan Hägg
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0137451
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antihypertensive Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Medication Adherence
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Failure
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Although a majority of patients with hypertension require a multidrug therapy, this is rarely considered when measuring adherence from refill data. Moreover, investigating the association between refill non-adherence to antihypertensive therapy (AHT) and elevated blood pressure (BP) has been advocated.
Identify factors associated with non-adherence to AHT, considering the multidrug therapy, and investigate the association between non-adherence to AHT and elevated BP.
A retrospective cohort study including patients with hypertension, identified from a random sample of 5025 Swedish adults. Two measures of adherence were estimated by the proportion of days covered method (PDC=80%): (1) Adherence to any antihypertensive medication and, (2) adherence to the full AHT regimen. Multiple logistic regressions were performed to investigate the association between sociodemographic factors (age, sex, education, income), clinical factors (user profile, number of antihypertensive medications, healthcare use, cardiovascular comorbidities) and non-adherence. Moreover, the association between non-adherence (long-term and a month prior to BP measurement) and elevated BP was investigated.
Non-adherence to any antihypertensive medication was higher among persons
Notes
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PubMed ID
26359861 View in PubMed
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Anaplastic ependymoma: treatment of pediatric patients with or without craniospinal radiation therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4023
Source
J Neurosurg. 1997 Jun;86(6):943-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
T E Merchant
T. Haida
M H Wang
J L Finlay
S A Leibel
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA.
Source
J Neurosurg. 1997 Jun;86(6):943-9
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Brain - radiation effects
Brain Neoplasms - radiotherapy - therapy
Child
Child, Preschool
Combined Modality Therapy
Ependymoma - radiotherapy - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
Retrospective Studies
Spinal Cord - radiation effects
Survival Analysis
Treatment Failure
Abstract
The authors conducted a retrospective review of the clinical and treatment characteristics and outcomes in 28 pediatric patients with anaplastic ependymoma treated with radiation therapy since the advent of computerized tomography (CT) (1978-1994). Twelve patients received craniospinal irradiation followed by a boost to the primary site, two received whole-brain radiation therapy followed by a boost to the primary site, and the remaining 14 were treated with focal radiation therapy. The mean dose to the primary site was 5486 cGy. With a median follow-up period of 86 months for the 14 surviving patients (range 31-201 months), the median disease-free survival, measured from the date of diagnosis to the time of recurrence after radiation therapy, was 40 months. The median disease-free survival measured from the start of radiation therapy was 32 months. The median overall survival rate has not been reached and the actuarial estimates of overall survival rates at 5 and 10 years were 56% and 38%, respectively. According to univariate analysis, the disease-free survival rate was significantly improved (p
PubMed ID
9171172 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic switch during treatment with antibiotics against respiratory tract infections in ambulatory care in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291301
Source
Infect Dis (Lond). 2017 Nov - Dec; 49(11-12):854-858
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Mari Blandhol
Thekla Tysland
Hege Salvesen Blix
Sigurd Høye
Author Affiliation
a Faculty of Medicine , University of Oslo , Oslo , Norway.
Source
Infect Dis (Lond). 2017 Nov - Dec; 49(11-12):854-858
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care
Anti-Bacterial Agents - administration & dosage
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Norway
Penicillin V - administration & dosage
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy
Treatment Failure
Abstract
To compare antibiotic treatment failure evaluated as switch from one type of antibiotics to another in ambulatory care.
Data on all dispensed doxycycline, amoxicillin, phenoxymethylpenicillin and macrolides in Norway June 2013 - May 2015, was retrieved from the Norwegian Prescription Database. We computed switch rates for the selected antibiotics on day 1-28 after initial dispensing, and the corresponding odds-ratios, adjusted for patients´ age and gender, and prescribers´ specialty.
Of 1.860.036 dispensed antibiotics, 103.076 (5.5%) were switched within 28 days. Within 10 days after the index date, the switch rate was highest for phenoxymethylpenicillin (4.1%), followed by amoxicillin (2.5%), macrolides and doxycycline (2.2%).
The switch rate after initial dispensing of phenoxymethylpenicillin is higher than that of more broad-spectrum antibiotics. However, it is still low, supporting the recommendation of phenoxymethylpenicillin as first line treatment when an antibiotic is indicated for a respiratory tract infection in primary care.
PubMed ID
28741975 View in PubMed
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The antihypertensive effect of fermented milk in individuals with prehypertension or borderline hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100641
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2010 Oct;24(10):678-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
L. Usinger
L T Jensen
B. Flambard
A. Linneberg
H. Ibsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Glostrup University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark. lotusi01@glo.regionh.dk
Source
J Hum Hypertens. 2010 Oct;24(10):678-83
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Cultured Milk Products - metabolism
Denmark
Double-Blind Method
Female
Fermentation
Heart rate
Humans
Hypertension - diet therapy - physiopathology
Lactobacillus helveticus - metabolism
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Placebo Effect
Prehypertension - diet therapy - physiopathology
Time Factors
Treatment Failure
Abstract
Fermented milk (FM) with putative antihypertensive effect in humans could be an easy applicable lifestyle intervention against hypertension. The mode of action is supposed to be through active milk peptides, shown to possess in vitro ACE-inhibitory effect. Blood pressure (BP) reductions upto 23?mm?Hg have been reported in spontaneously hypertensive rats fed FM. Results from human studies of the antihypertensive effect are inconsistent. However, many studies suffer from methodological weaknesses, as insufficient blinding and the use of office BP measurements. We conducted a randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled study of the antihypertensive effect of Lactobacillus helveticus FM in 94 prehypertensive and borderline hypertensive subjects. The participants were randomised into three treatment groups with a daily intake of 150?ml of FM, 300?ml of FM or placebo (chemically acidified milk). The primary outcome was repeated 24-h ambulatory BP measurements. There were no statistically significant differences in the outcome between the groups (systolic BP (SBP), P=0.9; diastolic BP (DBP), P=0.2). However, the group receiving 300?ml FM had reduced BP across the 8-week period in several readings, which could be compatible with a minor antihypertensive effect. Heart rate and lipids remained unchanged between groups. Hence, our study does not support earlier studies measuring office BP-measurements, reporting antihypertensive effect of FM. Based on straight performed 24-h ambulatory BP measurements, milk fermented with Lactobacillus helveticus does not posses significant antihypertensive effect.
PubMed ID
20147968 View in PubMed
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305 records – page 1 of 31.