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Climate change and hazards associated with ice use in Northern Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301002
Source
Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research. Vol. 40, no. 4: pp.647-659.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
associated with ice use for hunting and travel. This trend is related to changing ice conditions. Instrumental records show later ice freeze-up and earlier breakup since the late 1970s, increasing temperatures, and changes in weather in the case study communities. Elders and mature community members
  1 document  
Author
Ford, James D.
Pearce, Tristan
Gilligan, Justin
Smit, Barry
Oakes, Jill
Source
Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research. Vol. 40, no. 4: pp.647-659.
Date
2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
3520972
Keywords
Igloolik
Churchill
Ulukhaktok
Ice conditions
Hunting
Traveling
Traditional knowledge
Abstract
Research conducted with the communities of Igloolik, Ulukhaktok, and Churchill in northern Canada documents increasing exposure to hazards associated with ice use for hunting and travel. This trend is related to changing ice conditions. Instrumental records show later ice freeze-up and earlier breakup since the late 1970s, increasing temperatures, and changes in weather in the case study communities. Elders and mature community members, drawing upon their traditional knowledge, describe similar changes in ice and other climate-related conditions in recent years. These changes are increasing the risks of utilizing the ice for hunting and travel and they are reducing access to traditional food. Change in risk-taking behavior among users of the ice has also been documented in Igloolik and Ulukhaktok over the last few decades and has shaped the implications of more recent changes in ice conditions. Comparison between the communities reveals uneven consequences of changing ice conditions which is linked to the nature of ice use, local physiological setting, and community socio-cultural dynamics.
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If all ambulances could fly: Putting provincial standards of emergency care access to the test in Northern British Columbia

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101163
Source
Canadian Journal of Rural Medicine. 2005 Summer;10(3):163-168
Publication Type
Article
Date
Summer-2005
Services are being met in Northern British Columbia. In particular, we com- pare results obtained using the more commonly used straight-line, or “as the crow flies,” method with those obtained using a more sophisticated method that estimates travel time using digitally referenced road network data. Results
  1 document  
Author
McGregor, J
Hanlon, N
Emmons, S
Voaklander, D
Kelly, K
Author Affiliation
University of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC
Source
Canadian Journal of Rural Medicine. 2005 Summer;10(3):163-168
Date
Summer-2005
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
240211
Keywords
British Columbia
Canada
Distances
Emergency Treatment
Geographical Information Systems (GIS)
Population distributions
Road network data
Shortest-route analysis
Travel times
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Geographic access to emergency treatment remains an important public policy concern as rural emergency medical systems respond to various pressures to centralize services. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) are effective tools to determine what proportion of a given population is adequately served by existing or proposed service distributions.METHODS: This study compares 2 GIS approaches to determining whether recent standards of emergency care access established by the British Columbia Ministry of Health Services are being met in Northern British Columbia. In particular, we compare results obtained using the more commonly used straight-line, or "as the crow flies," method with those obtained using a more sophisticated method that estimates travel time using digitally referenced road network data.RESULTS: Both methods reveal that provincial standards of emergency access are not being met in Northern British Columbia.CONCLUSION: In terms of comparing the 2 approaches, the network technique indicated a lower level of access and was more accurate in identifying populations residing inside and outside the "golden hour" of emergency care.
PubMed ID
16079032 View in PubMed
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Literature review of Eskimo knowledge of the sea ice environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298794
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-65-7. 57 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
May 1966
October 1965. Air Force program monitor is Dr. Frederick A. Milan, ALRE, Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. This technical report has been reviewed and is approved. ii 1 ' ABSTRACT This report concerns travel and survival on Arctic sea ice. Information is totally derived from literature and
  1 document  
Author
Nelson, Richard K.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-65-7. 57 p.
Date
May 1966
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
4787620
Keywords
Alaska
Eskimo
Sea ice
Travel
Survival
Subsistence hunting
Abstract
This report concerns travel and survival on Arctic sea ice. Information is totally derived from literature and deals mainly with Alaskan Eskimo practices but includes some from areas of the Canadian Arctic. Much of the information is anecdotal and unsystematic observation made by pioneers and explorers familiar with the Arctic and the Eskimo. The report lists environmental phenomena or "stimuli" which are likely to occur in the Arctic, and the activities or "responses" which the sea ice traveler must make in order to cope with these external forces or to utilize resources which the environment provides. The author has segregated a series of external forces and resources, and has suggested one or several ways to deal with them. These are divided into the physical environment and biological environment. The first includes temperature, wind, precipitation, atmospheric phenomena, astronomical phenomena, and the sea ice itself. The second includes all sources of energy available to the sea ice hunter: invertebrates, fish, birds and mammals.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.65-7
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Performance of dentists working with the Grenfell Regional Health Services: productivity and services

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76577
Source
Pages 410-413 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Circumpolar Health 84:410-413 PERFORMANCE OF DENTISTS WORKING WITH THE GRENFELL REGIONAL HEALTH SERVICES: PRODUCTIVITY AND SERVICES JAMES G. MESSER Since the early 1960s many isolated northern Canadian communities have depended on the services of travelling dentists. Since that time
  1 document  
Author
Messer, J. G.
Author Affiliation
Dental Services, Grenfell Regional Health Services, St. Anthony, Newfoundland
Source
Pages 410-413 in R. Fortuine, ed. Circumpolar Health 84. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, 6th, Anchorage, 13-18 May, 1984. University of Washington Press, Seattle. 1985.
Date
1985
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Backup assistance
Equipment
Grenfell Regional Health Services
Travelling clinics
Travelling dentists
Treatment patterns
Work output
Work patterns
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Rural and remote obstetric care close to home: program description,evaluation and discussion of Sioux Lookout Meno Ya Win Health Centre obstetrics

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101169
Source
Canadian Journal of Rural Medicine. 2009 Spring;14(2):75-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Spring-2009
SOGC report identified a need for increased opportunities for Aboriginal women to deliver close to home in a familiar environment.2 BARRIERS Rural women are increasingly required to travel for obstetric services.3 This need for travel results in poorer birth outcomes.4 For women from remote
  1 document  
Author
Dooley, J
Kelly, L
St. Pierre-Hansen, N
Antone, I
Guilfoyle, J
O'Driscoll, T
Author Affiliation
Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Sioux Lookout, Ontario
Source
Canadian Journal of Rural Medicine. 2009 Spring;14(2):75-79
Date
Spring-2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
File Size
127136
Keywords
Canada
Complications
Cultural supports
Maternal care
Models of care
Obstetric services
Prenatal Care
Program coordination
Sioux Lookout
Telehealth evaluations
Travel
Abstract
PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal women in rural and remote settings struggle to access obstetric care close to home.OBJECTIVE OF THE PROGRAM: To deliver a full range of modern and safe obstetric care to 28 remote Aboriginal communities served by rural-based health care.PROGRAM DESCRIPTION: Rural family physicians provide intrapartum, cesarean delivery and anesthesia services to 350 rural, primarily Aboriginal women in a collegial, supportive environment.CONCLUSION: Rural and remote obstetric services need support before they fail. Patient volume, remote location and organizational culture are key elements. Evidence teaches us that outcomes are best when women deliver closer to home.
PubMed ID
19379632 View in PubMed
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Self-reported illness among travelers to the Russian Far East

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102186
Source
Pages 351-355 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Arctic Medical Research l'OI. 53: Suppl. 2, pp. 351-355, 1994 Self-reported Illness Among Travelers to the Russian Far East1 Michael Beller and Mindy Schloss Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Anchorage, Alaska. Abstract: This study evaluated the risk of travelers to the
  1 document  
Author
Beller, M
Schloss, M
Author Affiliation
Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Anchorage, Alaska
Source
Pages 351-355 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Air travel
Alaska
Anchorage
Commercial flights
Diarrhea
Gastrointestinal symptoms
Passengers
Respiratory symptoms
Russia
Russian Far East
Travelers
Abstract
This study evaluated the risk of travelers to the Russian Far East developing acute gastrointestinal or respiratory symptoms. Passengers and crew on 10 commercial airline flights from the Russian Far East to the United States were asked to complete a health questionnaire that asked age, sex, country of residence, length of stay, foods and beverages consumed, and about gastrointestinal or "flu" like symptoms. Questionnaires were returned by 353 of 662 persons (53.3 percent). The most frequently reported symptoms were diarrhea (N= 18; 5.1 percent) and "flu" symptoms (N=15; 4.2 percent). Among those people who reported symptoms, most were sick for 3 days or less, although 10 (27.0 percent) were still sick at the time they entered the United States. Age and sex were not associated with symptoms. Persons who drank untreated tap water were more likely to have gastrointestinal symptoms (relative risk=2.7; 95 percent confidence interval=I.2, 5.9), while those who drank bottled or canned fruit juice were protected (relative risk=0.4; 95 percent confidence interval=0.2, 0.8). The incidence of "flu" symptoms was similar to the rate in the United States, while the incidence of gastrointestinal symptoms was increased and only slightly less than the rate among travelers to developing countries. Travelers may wish to restrict consumption of untreated tap water and increase consumption of fruit juices. Additional work is needed to identify the pathogens responsible for acute illnesses among travelers to the Russian Far East.
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6 records – page 1 of 1.