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908 records – page 1 of 91.

Source
Lakartidningen. 2006 Sep 13-19;103(37):2662; discussion 2665-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Seidal Tomas
Author Affiliation
Länsjukhuset i Halmstad. tomas.seidal@lthalland.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2006 Sep 13-19;103(37):2662; discussion 2665-6
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
European Union
Female
Humans
International Cooperation
Pregnancy
Sweden
Travel
Women's Rights
Notes
Comment On: Lakartidningen. 2006 Jul 26-Aug 8;103(30-31):2238-916921980
Comment On: Lakartidningen. 2006 Jun 28-Jul 11;103(26-27):2067; discussion 206716881284
PubMed ID
17022188 View in PubMed
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[A case from general practice (10): Acute diarrhea during foreign travel].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220873
Source
Z Arztl Fortbild (Jena). 1993 Jun 12;87(6):523-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-12-1993
Author
H. Berndt
Author Affiliation
Klinik für Innere Medizin (Charité), Humboldt-Universität, Berlin.
Source
Z Arztl Fortbild (Jena). 1993 Jun 12;87(6):523-4
Date
Jun-12-1993
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diagnosis, Differential
Diarrhea - etiology
Duodenal Ulcer - complications - diagnosis
Humans
Male
Moscow
Peptic Ulcer Hemorrhage - complications - diagnosis
Travel
PubMed ID
8333219 View in PubMed
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Access by air: Mission Air provides vital link.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222916
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1992 Nov-Dec;1(6):22-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
T. Barr
Author Affiliation
Mission Air Transportation Network, Toronto.
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1992 Nov-Dec;1(6):22-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft - economics
Canada
Fund Raising - methods
Humans
Industry - economics
Interinstitutional Relations
Organizational Objectives
Transportation of Patients - economics - methods
Travel
Voluntary Health Agencies - organization & administration
Abstract
Every year thousands of Canadians must travel far from home to receive specialized medical treatment or diagnosis. For many individuals, funds for air travel are limited. The Mission Air Network removes some of this stress by arranging free flights for patients and family members or escorts, using seats donated by commercial, corporate and government sponsors.
PubMed ID
10123350 View in PubMed
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Accessibility to air travel correlates strongly with increasing melanoma incidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16510
Source
Melanoma Res. 2006 Feb;16(1):77-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Yolanda Z Agredano
Joanna L Chan
Ranch C Kimball
Alexa B Kimball
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California, USA.
Source
Melanoma Res. 2006 Feb;16(1):77-81
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft
Comparative Study
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Holidays - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Income - statistics & numerical data
Melanoma - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Sunlight
Travel - statistics & numerical data
Ultraviolet Rays - adverse effects
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
As the cost of air travel has decreased substantially in the USA and Europe over the past few decades, leisure travel to vacation destinations during the winter months has expanded significantly. This trend has probably increased the incidence of significant ultraviolet radiation exposure and sunburn in a broader population who could not previously afford this kind of travel. The purpose of this study was to analyse the correlation between increasing accessibility to air travel and melanoma incidence. This ecological study surveyed air travel patterns and melanoma incidence over the past three decades. Melanoma age-adjusted incidence was obtained from the United States Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results 9 Registry Database, 1975-2000, and the Cancer Registry of Norway, 1965-2000. United States mean inflation-adjusted airfare prices for four airports linked to leisure destinations (Miami, Los Angeles, San Diego, Phoenix) were compared with melanoma incidence. Parallel analyses were performed using annual domestic passenger-kilometres and melanoma incidence in Norway. Declining United States leisure-specific airfares corresponded strongly with increasing melanoma incidence (r = 0.96, r = 0.92, P
PubMed ID
16432460 View in PubMed
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Source
J Trauma. 2010 Dec;69(6):1350-61; discussion 1361
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Syed Morad Hameed
Nadine Schuurman
Tarek Razek
Darrell Boone
Rardi Van Heest
Tracey Taulu
Nasira Lakha
David C Evans
D Ross Brown
Andrew W Kirkpatrick
Henry T Stelfox
Dianne Dyer
Mary van Wijngaarden-Stephens
Sarvesh Logsetty
Avery B Nathens
Tanya Charyk-Stewart
Sandro Rizoli
Lorraine N Tremblay
Frederick Brenneman
Najma Ahmed
Elsie Galbraith
Neil Parry
Murray J Girotti
Guiseppe Pagliarello
Nancy Tze
Kosar Khwaja
Natalie Yanchar
John M Tallon
J Andrew I Trenholm
Candance Tegart
Ofer Amram
Myriam Berube
Usmaan Hameed
Richard K Simons
Author Affiliation
Research Committee of the Trauma Association of Canada, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. morad.hameed@vch.ca
Source
J Trauma. 2010 Dec;69(6):1350-61; discussion 1361
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Catchment Area (Health)
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Questionnaires
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Trauma Centers
Travel
Abstract
Trauma is a leading cause of morbidity, potential years of life lost and health care expenditure in Canada and around the world. Trauma systems have been established across North America to provide comprehensive injury care and to lead injury control efforts. We sought to describe the current status of trauma systems in Canada and Canadians' access to acute, multidisciplinary trauma care.
A national survey was used to identify the locations and capabilities of adult trauma centers across Canada and to identify the catchment populations they serve. Geographic information science methods were used to map the locations of Level I and Level II trauma centers and to define 1-hour road travel times around each trauma center. Data from the 2006 Canadian Census were used to estimate populations within and outside 1-hour access to definitive trauma care.
In Canada, 32 Level I and Level II trauma centers provide definitive trauma care and coordinate the efforts of their surrounding trauma systems. Most Canadians (77.5%) reside within 1-hour road travel catchments of Level I or Level II centers. However, marked geographic disparities in access persist. Of the 22.5% of Canadians who live more than an hour away from a Level I or Level II trauma centers, all are in rural and remote regions.
Access to high quality acute trauma care is well established across parts of Canada but a clear urban/rural divide persists. Regional efforts to improve short- and long-term outcomes after severe trauma should focus on the optimization of access to pre-hospital care and acute trauma care in rural communities using locally relevant strategies or novel care delivery options.
PubMed ID
20838258 View in PubMed
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Access to treatment and educational inequalities in cancer survival.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266954
Source
J Health Econ. 2014 Jul;36:98-111
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Jon H Fiva
Torbjørn Hægeland
Marte Rønning
Astri Syse
Source
J Health Econ. 2014 Jul;36:98-111
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cancer Care Facilities - utilization
Educational Status
Female
Geography
Health Behavior
Health Services Accessibility
Health Status Disparities
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Physician-Patient Relations
Quality of Health Care
Referral and Consultation - standards - statistics & numerical data
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Specialization - standards - statistics & numerical data
Survival Analysis
Travel
Abstract
The public health care systems in the Nordic countries provide high quality care almost free of charge to all citizens. However, social inequalities in health persist. Previous research has, for example, documented substantial educational inequalities in cancer survival. We investigate to what extent this may be driven by differential access to and utilization of high quality treatment options. Quasi-experimental evidence based on the establishment of regional cancer wards indicates that (i) highly educated individuals utilized centralized specialized treatment to a greater extent than less educated patients and (ii) the use of such treatment improved these patients' survival.
PubMed ID
24780404 View in PubMed
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Accidents and unpleasant incidents: worry in transport and prediction of travel behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149384
Source
Risk Anal. 2009 Sep;29(9):1217-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Agathe Backer-Grøndahl
Aslak Fyhri
Pål Ulleberg
Astrid Helene Amundsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Transport Economics, NO-0349, Oslo, Norway. abg@toi.no
Source
Risk Anal. 2009 Sep;29(9):1217-26
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anxiety
Humans
Middle Aged
Norway
Transportation
Travel
Young Adult
Abstract
Worry on nine different means of transport was measured in a Norwegian sample of 853 respondents. The main aim of the study was to investigate differences in worry about accidents and worry about unpleasant incidents, and how these two sorts of worry relate to various means of transport as well as transport behavior. Factor analyses of worry about accidents suggested a division between rail transport, road transport, and nonmotorized transport, whereas analyses of worry about unpleasant incidents suggested a division between transport modes where you interact with other people and "private" transport modes. Moreover, mean ratings of worry showed that respondents worried more about accidents than unpleasant incidents on private transport modes, and more about unpleasant incidents than accidents on public transport modes. Support for the distinction between worry about accidents and unpleasant incidents was also found when investigating relationships between both types of worry and behavioral adaptations: worry about accidents was more important than worry about unpleasant incidents in relation to behavioral adaptations on private means of transport, whereas the opposite was true for public means of transport. Finally, predictors of worry were investigated. The models of worry about accidents and worry about unpleasant incidents differed as to what predictors turned out significant. Knowledge about peoples' worries on different means of transport is important with regard to understanding and influencing transport and travel behavior, as well as attending to commuters' welfare.
PubMed ID
19645756 View in PubMed
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The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in Denmark. A report from the Copenhagen study group of AIDS on the first 20 Danish patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8796
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1985;217(2):213-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
J. Gerstoft
J O Nielsen
E. Dickmeiss
T. Rønne
P. Platz
L. Mathiesen
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1985;217(2):213-24
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - immunology - transmission
Adult
Africa, Central
Denmark
Homosexuality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Travel
United States
Abstract
Twenty Danish patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) had been diagnosed by January 1984, 14 of them after 1982. Eighteen patients were male homosexuals, 8 of whom had visited the USA after 1979, 2 were heterosexual males with a history of sexual contacts in Central Africa, suggesting a transmission of AIDS from woman to man. AIDS has not been observed in drug abusers, hemophiliacs or transfused non-risk persons in Denmark. The clinical picture varied according to the presence of Kaposi sarcoma or the type of opportunistic infections, but was in general similar to that reported from the USA. Investigation of T-lymphocyte subsets revealed that the AIDS patients differed from controls and healthy homosexual men by having either a very low number of helper cells or a low helper/suppressor cell ratio. Functional immunological studies revealed a decreased natural killer cell activity and decreased blast transformation by mitogens. The survival two years after diagnosis was 16%.
PubMed ID
3993435 View in PubMed
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Acquired risk factors for venous thromboembolism in medical patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95327
Source
Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program. 2005;:458-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Prandoni Paolo
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Padua, Via Ospedale Civile, 105, Padua 35128, Italy. paoloprandoni@tin.it
Source
Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program. 2005;:458-61
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Dehydration - complications
Female
Fractures, Bone - complications
Humans
Paralysis - complications
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Puerperal Disorders - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Travel
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a serious and potentially fatal disorder, which often complicates the course of hospitalized patients, but may also affect ambulatory and otherwise healthy people. While the introduction of thromboprophylactic measures is expected to have reduced the occurrence of postoperative VTE, there is an increasing awareness of the importance of medical conditions in determining thromboembolic events. Among the conditions that predispose patients to VTE are increasing age, cancer and its treatment, prolonged immobility, stroke or paralysis, previous VTE, congestive heart failure, acute infection, pregnancy or puerperium, dehydration, hormonal treatment, varicose veins, long air travel, acute inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatologic disease, and nephrotic syndrome. Other factors that have recently been associated with an increased risk of VTE disorders include persistent elevation of D-dimer and atherosclerotic disease. Recognition of the incidence and clinical importance of thrombosis will most likely encourage more widespread use of antithrombotic prophylaxis in medical patients.
PubMed ID
16304420 View in PubMed
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908 records – page 1 of 91.