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Update on trauma care in Canada. 1. Recent advances in thermal injuries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227901
Source
Can J Surg. 1990 Dec;33(6):439-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1990
Author
E E Tredget
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
Can J Surg. 1990 Dec;33(6):439-42
Date
Dec-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Burns - metabolism - mortality - surgery
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Clinical Protocols - standards
Energy Metabolism
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Patient transfer
Prognosis
Sex Factors
Skin Transplantation
Survival Rate
Traumatology - standards - trends
Wound Healing
Abstract
Thermal injury frequently occurs in traumatized patients in North America and causes serious morbidity and mortality, predominantly to children and young adults. Over the past decade, considerable technologic advances have improved survival after burn injury. Ongoing research coupled with current surgical advances in equipment, technique, early wound closure and alternative forms of wound coverage offer the potential for greater survival with enhanced quality of life for traumatized patients with burn injuries. However, sepsis and inhalation injury remain important ongoing causes of death, for which the understanding and solutions appear to be unfolding as research into the multisystem effects of the inflammatory process continues.
PubMed ID
2253118 View in PubMed
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Update on trauma care in Canada. 2. Update on pediatric trauma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227900
Source
Can J Surg. 1990 Dec;33(6):443-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1990
Author
G K Blair
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, British Columbia's Children's Hospital, Vancouver.
Source
Can J Surg. 1990 Dec;33(6):443-6
Date
Dec-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Clinical Protocols - standards
Databases, Factual
Decision Trees
Humans
Pediatrics - standards - trends
Traumatology - standards - trends
Abstract
Selective conservatism is the key to the rational management of pediatric trauma, realizing that children may harbour severe occult injuries. The modern treatment of childhood abdominal trauma best exemplifies this approach: nonoperative management of splenic trauma is now standard for children, and a selective conservative approach is advised in the handling of childhood liver and pancreatic injuries. Prevention of childhood injuries should be the goal. The development of a national database of childhood trauma should provide the basis for action to educate and legislate for prevention. When prevention fails, however, up-to-date quality pediatric trauma care is the key.
PubMed ID
2253119 View in PubMed
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