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1 Canadian Field Hospital in Haiti: surgical experience in earthquake relief.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122035
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Max Talbot
Bethann Meunier
Vincent Trottier
Michael Christian
Tracey Hillier
Chris Berger
Vivian McAlister
Scott Taylor
Author Affiliation
1 Canadian Field Hospital, Canadian Forces, Montreal, QC. max_talbot@hotmail.com
Source
Can J Surg. 2012 Aug;55(4):271-4
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Earthquakes
Female
Haiti
Hospitals, Packaged - organization & administration
Humans
International Cooperation
Male
Multiple Trauma - etiology - surgery
Operating Rooms
Relief Work - organization & administration
Surgical Procedures, Operative - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The Canadian Forces' (CF) deployable hospital, 1 Canadian Field Hospital, was deployed to Haiti after an earthquake that caused massive devastation. Two surgical teams performed 167 operations over a 39-day period starting 17 days after the index event. Most operations were unrelated to the earthquake. Replacing or supplementing the destroyed local surgical capacity for a brief period after a disaster can be a valuable contribution to relief efforts. For future humanitarian operations/disaster response missions, the CF will study the feasibility of accelerating the deployment of surgical capabilities.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22854149 View in PubMed
Less detail

[4-stage system of treatment of patients with injuries of the musculo-skeletal apparatus].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246734
Source
Vestn Khir Im I I Grek. 1979 Nov;123(11):97-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1979
Author
A V Vorontsov
T N Kukushkina
Iu M Dokish
Source
Vestn Khir Im I I Grek. 1979 Nov;123(11):97-100
Date
Nov-1979
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dislocations - rehabilitation - therapy
First Aid
Fractures, Bone - rehabilitation - therapy
Humans
Length of Stay
Rehabilitation Centers - organization & administration
Russia
Transportation of Patients
Trauma Centers - organization & administration
Abstract
The four-step system for the treatment of traumatological patients contributes to earlier rehabilitation and shortens the time fo staying in hospitals. It also decreases the invalidism percentage.
PubMed ID
160650 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 4-year review of severe pediatric trauma in eastern Ontario: a descriptive analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191929
Source
J Trauma. 2002 Jan;52(1):8-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2002
Author
Martin H Osmond
Maureen Brennan-Barnes
Allyson L Shephard
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. osmond@cheo.on.ca
Source
J Trauma. 2002 Jan;52(1):8-12
Date
Jan-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidental Falls - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Child Abuse - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
Trauma Severity Indices
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The objective of this study was to describe a population of children admitted to a tertiary care pediatric hospital with severe trauma to identify key areas for injury prevention research, and programming.
Retrospective chart review conducted on all children 0-17 years admitted to the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO) between April 1, 1996, and March 31, 2000, following acute trauma. Each record was reviewed and assigned an ISS using the AIS 1990 revision. All cases with an ISS > 11 were included in the study.
There were 2610 trauma cases admitted to CHEO over the study period. Of these, 237 (9.1%) had severe trauma (ISS > 11). Sixty-two percent were male. Twenty-nine percent were between the ages of 10 and 14 years, 27% between 5 and 9 years, 16% between 15 and 17 years, 15% between 1 and 4 years, and 13% less than 1 year old. The most common mechanisms of injury were due to motor vehicle traffic (39%), falls (24%), child abuse (8%), and sports (5%). Of those resulting from motor vehicle traffic, 53 (57%) were occupants, 22 (24%) were pedestrians, and 18 (19%) were cyclists. When combining traffic and nontraffic mechanisms, 26 (11% of all severe trauma cases) occurred as a result of cycling incidents. The most severe injury in 65% of patients was to the head and neck body region.
Research efforts and activities to prevent severe pediatric trauma in our region should focus on road safety, protection from head injuries, avoidance of falls, and prevention of child abuse.
PubMed ID
11791045 View in PubMed
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[6 principles of the therapeutic and diagnostic process in severe combined mechanical injury and the characteristics of their realization during the staged treatment of victims].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213090
Source
Vestn Khir Im I I Grek. 1996;155(5):80-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
I A Eriukhin
V G Marchuk
V F Lebedev
V V Boiarintsev
Source
Vestn Khir Im I I Grek. 1996;155(5):80-4
Date
1996
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Emergencies
First Aid
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Military Personnel
Multiple Trauma - diagnosis - rehabilitation - surgery
Russia
Trauma Centers
Abstract
Great experience with treatment and a comprehensive investigation of the severe combined trauma allowed the authors to choose six basic principles to be followed in diagnosing and treatment of this surgical pathology whose peculiarity is the phenomenon of mutual aggravation of the injuries. Following these principles, especially at surgical hospitals, promotes complete diagnosing, choice of the rational treatment policy in order to avoid medical errors and severe posttraumatic and postshock complications and to improve the outcomes. The authors prove expediency of organization of the multifield specialized centers for treatment of patients with the severe combined traumas.
PubMed ID
9123768 View in PubMed
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A 10-year incidence of acute whiplash injuries after road traffic crashes in a defined population in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122426
Source
PM R. 2012 Oct;4(10):739-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Johan Styrke
Britt-Marie Stålnacke
Per-Olof Bylund
Peter Sojka
Ulf Björnstig
Author Affiliation
Division of Surgery, Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, 901 85 Umeå, Sweden. johan.styrke@surgery.umu.se
Source
PM R. 2012 Oct;4(10):739-47
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data - trends
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Automobiles
Bicycling
Catchment Area (Health)
Child
Child, Preschool
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Humans
Incidence
Insurance Claim Reporting - statistics & numerical data - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Trauma Centers
Whiplash Injuries - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine the annual incidence of acute whiplash injuries after road traffic crashes in a geographic catchment area in Northern Sweden during the period 2000-2009.
Descriptive epidemiology determined by prospectively collected data from a defined population.
The study was conducted at a public hospital in Sweden.
The population of the hospital's catchment area (136,600 inhabitants in 1999 and 144,500 in 2009).
At the emergency department, all injured persons (approximately 11,000 per year) were asked to answer a questionnaire about the injury incident. Data from the medical records also were analyzed. From 2000-2009, 15,506 persons were injured in vehicle crashes. Persons who were subject to an acute neck injury within whiplash-associated disorder grades 1-3 were included. The overall and annual incidences were calculated as incidence. Age, gender, type of injury event, and direction of impact were described. The incidences were compared with national statistics on insurance claims from 2003, 2007, and 2008 to detect changes in the proportions of claims.
The annual incidence of acute whiplash injuries. Secondary outcome measures were types of injury events, age and gender distribution, changes in the proportion of rear-end crashes during 2000-2009, and changes in the proportion of insurance claims during 2003-2008.
During 2000-2009, 3297 cases of acute whiplash injury were encountered. The overall incidence was 235/100,000/year. The average yearly increase in incidence was 1.0%. Women comprised 51.9% and men 48.1% of the injured. Car occupants (86.4%) and bicycle riders (6.1%) were most frequently injured. The proportion of rear-end crashes decreased from 55% to 45% from 2000-2009. The proportion of insurance claims significantly decreased between 2003 and 2008 (P
PubMed ID
22819305 View in PubMed
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The 1993 Fraser N. Gurd Lecture: The view from the edge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217361
Source
J Trauma. 1994 Sep;37(3):379-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
G W Fitzgerald
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Charles S. Curtis Memorial Hospital, St. Anthony, Newfoundland, Canada.
Source
J Trauma. 1994 Sep;37(3):379-86
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Delivery of Health Care
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Off-Road Motor Vehicles
Rural Population
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
PubMed ID
8083897 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A 5-year series. Injuries in moped and motorcycle accidents].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241814
Source
Lakartidningen. 1983 Jun 15;80(24):2514-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-1983

Abbreviated Injury Scale: not a reliable basis for summation of injury severity in trauma facilities?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122288
Source
Injury. 2013 May;44(5):691-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Kjetil G Ringdal
Nils Oddvar Skaga
Morten Hestnes
Petter Andreas Steen
Jo Røislien
Marius Rehn
Olav Røise
Andreas J Krüger
Hans Morten Lossius
Author Affiliation
Department of Research, Norwegian Air Ambulance Foundation, Drøbak, Norway. kjetil.ringdal@norskluftambulanse.no
Source
Injury. 2013 May;44(5):691-9
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abbreviated Injury Scale
Benchmarking
Clinical Coding
Female
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Male
Norway
Reproducibility of Results
Trauma Centers
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
Injury severity is most frequently classified using the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) as a basis for the Injury Severity Score (ISS) and the New Injury Severity Score (NISS), which are used for assessment of overall injury severity in the multiply injured patient and in outcome prediction. European trauma registries recommended the AIS 2008 edition, but the levels of inter-rater agreement and reliability of ISS and NISS, associated with its use, have not been reported.
Nineteen Norwegian AIS-certified trauma registry coders were invited to score 50 real, anonymised patient medical records using AIS 2008. Rater agreements for ISS and NISS were analysed using Bland-Altman plots with 95% limits of agreement (LoA). A clinically acceptable LoA range was set at ± 9 units. Reliability was analysed using a two-way mixed model intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) statistics with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) and hierarchical agglomerative clustering.
Ten coders submitted their coding results. Of their AIS codes, 2189 (61.5%) agreed with a reference standard, 1187 (31.1%) real injuries were missed, and 392 non-existing injuries were recorded. All LoAs were wider than the predefined, clinically acceptable limit of ± 9, for both ISS and NISS. The joint ICC (range) between each rater and the reference standard was 0.51 (0.29,0.86) for ISS and 0.51 (0.27,0.78) for NISS. The joint ICC (range) for inter-rater reliability was 0.49 (0.19,0.85) for ISS and 0.49 (0.16,0.82) for NISS. Univariate linear regression analyses indicated a significant relationship between the number of correctly AIS-coded injuries and total number of cases coded during the rater's career, but no significant relationship between the rater-against-reference ISS and NISS ICC values and total number of cases coded during the rater's career.
Based on AIS 2008, ISS and NISS were not reliable for summarising anatomic injury severity in this study. This result indicates a limitation in their use as benchmarking tools for trauma system performance.
PubMed ID
22831922 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abdominal injuries in a low trauma volume hospital--a descriptive study from northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264480
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2014;22:48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Patrik Pekkari
Per-Olof Bylund
Hans Lindgren
Mikael Öman
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2014;22:48
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Adolescent
Adult
Disease Management
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospital Mortality - trends
Hospitals, Low-Volume - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Injury Severity Score
Length of Stay - trends
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Abdominal injuries occur relatively infrequently during trauma, and they rarely require surgical intervention. In this era of non-operative management of abdominal injuries, surgeons are seldom exposed to these patients. Consequently, surgeons may misinterpret the mechanism of injury, underestimate symptoms and radiologic findings, and delay definite treatment. Here, we determined the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment of traumatic abdominal injuries at our hospital to provide a basis for identifying potential hazards in non-operative management of patients with these injuries in a low trauma volume hospital.
This retrospective study included prehospital and in-hospital assessments of 110 patients that received 147 abdominal injuries from an isolated abdominal trauma (n = 70 patients) or during multiple trauma (n = 40 patients). Patients were primarily treated at the University Hospital of Umeå from January 2000 to December 2009.
The median New Injury Severity Score was 9 (range: 1-57) for 147 abdominal injuries. Most patients (94%) received computed tomography (CT), but only 38% of patients with multiple trauma were diagnosed with CT
Notes
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PubMed ID
25124882 View in PubMed
Less detail

[About investigations of socioeconomic consequences of neurotrauma].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150502
Source
Zh Vopr Neirokhir Im N N Burdenko. 2009 Jan-Mar;(1):65-8
Publication Type
Article

1604 records – page 1 of 161.