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Aml1 gene rearrangements and mutations in radiation-associated acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16922
Source
J Radiat Res (Tokyo). 2005 Jun;46(2):249-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Sergiy Klymenko
Klaus Trott
Michael Atkinson
Karin Bink
Vladimir Bebeshko
Dimitry Bazyka
Iryna Dmytrenko
Iryna Abramenko
Nadia Bilous
Andrei Misurin
Horst Zitzelsberger
Michael Rosemann
Author Affiliation
Department of Haematology, Research Centre for Radiation Medicine, Kyiv, Ukraine. klymenko_sergiy@yahoo.co.uk
Source
J Radiat Res (Tokyo). 2005 Jun;46(2):249-55
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adult
Aged
Causality
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Core Binding Factor Alpha 2 Subunit
DNA Mutational Analysis
DNA-Binding Proteins - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency
Humans
Incidence
Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute - epidemiology - genetics - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Myelodysplastic Syndromes - epidemiology - genetics - metabolism
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - genetics - metabolism
Power Plants
Proto-Oncogene Proteins - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Transcription Factors - genetics
Translocation, Genetic - genetics - radiation effects
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
Several studies suggested a causal link between AML1 gene rearrangements and both radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Fifty-three AML samples were analyzed for the presence of AML1 abnormalities using fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Of these patients, 24 had experienced radiation exposure due to the Chernobyl accident, and 29 were non-irradiated spontaneous AML cases and served as controls. AML1/ETO translocations were found in 9 of 29 spontaneous AML but only in 1 of 24 radiation-associated AML cases. This difference between translocation frequencies is statistically significant in the age-unstratified cohorts (p=0.015). Following age stratification, the difference becomes less pronounced but remains on borderline significance (p=0.053). AML1 mutation status was assessed in 5 clean-up workers at Chernobyl NPP with MDS, or AML following MDS, by direct sequencing of genomic DNA from the coding region (exon 3 through 8). In one patient who developed MDS following an acute radiation syndrome, a hexanucleotide duplication of CGGCAT in exon 8 was found, inserted after base position 1502. Our results suggest that AML1 gene translocations are infrequent in radiation-induced leukemogenesis but are consistent with the idea that radiation may contribute to the development of MDS through AML1 gene mutation.
PubMed ID
15988144 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of symmetrical translocations for retrospective biodosimetry in radiation workers of the Mayak nuclear-industrial complex (Southern Urals) using FISH-chromosome painting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204096
Source
Int J Radiat Biol. 1998 Oct;74(4):431-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
Author
K. Salassidis
H. Braselmann
N D Okladnikova
S. Pressl
G. Stephan
G. Snigiryova
M. Bauchinger
Author Affiliation
GSF-National Research Center for Environment and Health, Institute of Radiobiology, Neuherberg, Germany.
Source
Int J Radiat Biol. 1998 Oct;74(4):431-9
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Chromosome Aberrations
Chromosomes - radiation effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Female
Gamma Rays - adverse effects
Humans
In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
Lymphocytes
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - etiology
Occupational Diseases
Occupational Exposure
Plutonium - toxicity
Radiometry
Retrospective Studies
Russia
Translocation, Genetic - genetics
Abstract
Frequencies of symmetrical translocations were determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for retrospective biodosimetry in workers occupationally exposed to external gamma-rays and internal plutonium at the Mayak nuclear-industrial complex (Southern Urals, Russia).
Chromosome analyses were carried out on peripheral lymphocytes from 75 Mayak workers who had received their main exposures between 1948 and 1963. Cumulative external gamma-ray doses between 0.02 and 9.91 Sv and plutonium burdens ranging between 0.26 and 18.5 kBq are reported. As controls, 33 unexposed persons from non-contaminated areas of the Southern Urals were used. Whole-chromosome painting probes for chromosomes 1, 4 and 12 were used simultaneously with a pancentromeric probe.
Compared with the control group, a significantly elevated translocation frequency was found for the total study group and for either of two subsets with (48 subjects) and without (27 subjects) plutonium incorporation. The dicentric frequency was not significantly different from the control level. In the pooled data set, translocation frequencies showed a significant dependence on cumulative external gamma-ray doses. Plutonium uptake had no substantial influence. Individual dose estimates for 21 cases exhibiting at least five translocations ranged between 0.5 and 1.8 Gy, which is substantially lower than the workers' registered personal doses.
At 35-40 years after protracted exposure to low-dose rate external gamma-rays, the postulated lifetime stability of translocations cannot be confirmed. Apparently, the natural loss of translocation-bearing peripheral lymphocytes cannot be fully compensated so that a temporal decline even of transmissible aberrations takes place. As a consequence, individual retrospective biodosimetry estimates cannot be obtained reliably from the remaining fraction of translocations.
PubMed ID
9798953 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of applicability of archived cytological lung cancer specimens for molecular genetic analysis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272105
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2015;61(6):968-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
N V Mityushkina
A G Ievleva
A N Poltoratsky
A O Ivantsov
A I Budovsky
V I Novik
E N Imyanitov
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2015;61(6):968-71
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - genetics
Antineoplastic Agents - pharmacology
Biological Specimen Banks
DNA Repair - drug effects - genetics
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic - drug effects
Genetic Testing
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - genetics
Molecular Biology
Molecular Targeted Therapy
Mutation
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases - genetics
Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor - genetics
Russia
Specimen Handling
Translocation, Genetic
Abstract
Molecular genetic analysis of lung tumors is often essential for the proper choice of therapy. EGFR mutation is a well-known marker of sensitivity to gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib; ALK-translocations make tumor sensitive to several ALK inhibitors; low intratumoral expression of DNA repair genes (ERCC1, BRCA1, etc.) may increase the therapeutic index of platinum-based drugs. Usually these markers are evaluated using formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissues. The goal of this work was to assess utility of archived cytological lung cancer specimens as an alternative source of material for molecular genetic testing. We analyzed paired histological and cytological lung adenocarcinoma specimens. Comparison of results within the pairs showed that cytological material can be used instead of histological material for qualitative analyses (detection of EGFR mutations or ALK-translocations); however, gene expression measurements, obtained by quantitative real-time PCR, may differ significantly in histological and cytological samples from the same patient.
PubMed ID
26995989 View in PubMed
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Associations between oxytocin-related genes and autistic-like traits.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259494
Source
Soc Neurosci. 2014;9(4):378-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Daniel Hovey
Anna Zettergren
Lina Jonsson
Jonas Melke
Henrik Anckarsäter
Paul Lichtenstein
Lars Westberg
Source
Soc Neurosci. 2014;9(4):378-86
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antigens, CD38 - genetics
Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Nuclear Translocator - genetics
Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors - genetics
Child
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive - genetics - psychology
Female
Genotyping Techniques
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Language Development Disorders - genetics
Male
Membrane Glycoproteins - genetics
Oxytocin - genetics
Parents
Phenotype
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Repressor Proteins - genetics
Social Behavior
Stereotyped Behavior
Sweden
Abstract
Oxytocin has repeatedly been shown to influence human behavior in social contexts; also, a relationship between oxytocin and the pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been suggested. In the present study, we investigated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the oxytocin gene (OXT) and the genes for single-minded 1 (SIM1), aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator 2 (ARNT2) and cluster of differentiation 38 (CD38) in a population of 1771 children from the Child and Adolescent Twin Study in Sweden (CATSS). Statistical analyses were performed to investigate any association between SNPs and autistic-like traits (ALTs), measured through ASD scores in the Autism-Tics, ADHD and other Co-morbidities inventory. Firstly, we found a statistically significant association between the SIM1 SNP rs3734354 (Pro352Thr) and scores for language impairment (p = .0004), but due to low statistical power this should be interpreted cautiously. Furthermore, nominal associations were found between ASD scores and SNPs in OXT, ARNT2 and CD38. In summary, the present study lends support to the hypothesis that oxytocin and oxytocin neuron development may have an influence on the development of ALTs and suggests a new candidate gene in the search for the pathophysiology of ASD.
PubMed ID
24635660 View in PubMed
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A balanced translocation truncates Neurotrimin in a family with intracranial and thoracic aortic aneurysm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119966
Source
J Med Genet. 2012 Oct;49(10):621-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Tiia M Luukkonen
Minna Pöyhönen
Aarno Palotie
Pekka Ellonen
Sonja Lagström
Joseph H Lee
Joseph D Terwilliger
Riitta Salonen
Teppo Varilo
Author Affiliation
Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland FIMM, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Med Genet. 2012 Oct;49(10):621-9
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actins - genetics
Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic - complications - genetics
Chromosome Breakage
Chromosome Mapping
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 10
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11
DNA Copy Number Variations
Family
Finland
GPI-Linked Proteins - genetics
Gene Frequency
Genes, Dominant
Genotype
Humans
Intracranial Aneurysm - complications - genetics
Karyotyping
Neural Cell Adhesion Molecules - genetics
Pedigree
Pilot Projects
Registries
Translocation, Genetic
Abstract
Balanced chromosomal rearrangements occasionally have strong phenotypic effects, which may be useful in understanding pathobiology. However, conventional strategies for characterising breakpoints are laborious and inaccurate. We present here a proband with a thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) and a balanced translocation t(10;11) (q23.2;q24.2). Our purpose was to sequence the chromosomal breaks in this family to reveal a novel candidate gene for aneurysm.
Intracranial aneurysm (IA) and TAAs appear to run in the family in an autosomal dominant manner: After exploring the family history, we observed that the proband's two siblings both died from cerebral haemorrhage, and the proband's parent and parent's sibling died from aortic rupture. After application of a genome-wide paired-end DNA sequencing method for breakpoint mapping, we demonstrate that this translocation breaks intron 1 of a splicing isoform of Neurotrimin at 11q25 in a previously implicated candidate region for IAs and AAs (OMIM 612161).
Our results demonstrate the feasibility of genome-wide paired-end sequencing for the characterisation of balanced rearrangements and identification of candidate genes in patients with potentially disease-associated chromosome rearrangements. The family samples were gathered as a part of our recently launched National Registry of Reciprocal Balanced Translocations and Inversions in Finland (n=2575), and we believe that such a registry will be a powerful resource for the localisation of chromosomal aberrations, which can bring insight into the aetiology of related phenotypes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23054244 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Int J Cancer. 1997 Jan 6;70(1):1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-6-1997
Author
J. Avila-Cariño
N. Lewin
Y. Tomita
A. Szeles
A. Sandlund
S. Mosolits
H. Mellstedt
G. Klein
E. Klein
Author Affiliation
Microbiology and Tumor Biology Center, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. Javier.Avila-Carino@mtc.ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 1997 Jan 6;70(1):1-8
Date
Jan-6-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antigens, CD - metabolism
Cell Survival
Cell Transformation, Viral - physiology
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 18 - genetics
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 22 - genetics
Herpesvirus 4, Human - classification - immunology
Humans
Immunophenotyping
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Chronic, B-Cell - genetics - immunology - pathology - virology
Male
Phenotype
T-Lymphocytes - immunology
T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic - immunology
Translocation, Genetic
Tumor Cells, Cultured
Tumor Markers, Biological - metabolism
Tumor Virus Infections - immunology
Viral Proteins - analysis
Abstract
In studies concerning the interaction of B-CLL cells and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), we encountered one patient whose cells had several unusual properties. In addition to the B-cell markers, the CLL cells expressed the exclusive T-cell markers CD3 and CD8 and carried a translocation t(18,22)(q21;q11), involving the bcl-2 and Ig lambda loci. The patient represents the 4th reported CLL case with this translocation. The CLL cells could be infected and immortalized by the indigenous and by the prototype B958 virus in vitro. The T-cell markers were not detectable on the established lines. In all experiments the immortalized lines originated from the CLL cells. Their preferential emergence over virus-infected normal B cells may be coupled to the high expression of the bcl-2 gene due to the translocation. In spite of the sensitivity of CLL cells to EBV infection in vitro, no EBNA-positive cells were detected in the ex vivo population. In vitro, we could generate cytotoxic function in T-lymphocyte cultures which acted on autologous EBV-infected CLL cells. Therefore we assume that if such cells emerged in vivo they were eliminated by the T-cell response.
PubMed ID
8985083 View in PubMed
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Biological dosimetry of Chernobyl cleanup workers: Inclusion of data on age and smoking provides improved radiation dose estimates

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67505
Source
Radiat Res. 1999 Dec;152(6):655-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
Moore, DH
Tucker, JD
Author Affiliation
Research Institute, California Pacific Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143-0808, USA
Source
Radiat Res. 1999 Dec;152(6):655-64
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Calibration
Cells, Cultured
Chi-Square Distribution
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1 - radiation effects
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 2 - radiation effects
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 4 - radiation effects
Comparative Study
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Occupational Exposure
Poisson Distribution
Power Plants
Radiation Dosage
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Russia
Smoking
Translocation, Genetic - radiation effects
Ukraine
Abstract
We report the results of a study of chromosome translocations in 126 Russian subjects who participated in the cleanup activities at Chernobyl and another 53 subjects, from other places in Russia, who were not exposed at Chernobyl. In agreement with our earlier study, we find increased translocation frequencies among the exposed compared to Russian controls. We describe statistical methods for estimating the dose of ionizing radiation determined by scoring chromosome translocations found in circulating lymphocytes sampled several years after exposure. Two statistical models were fitted to the data. One model assumed that translocation frequencies followed an overdispersed Poisson distribution. The second model assumed that translocation frequencies followed a negative binomial distribution. In addition, the effects of radiation exposure were modeled as additive or as multiplicative to the effects of age and smoking history. We found that the negative binomial model fit the data better than the overdispersed Poisson model. We could not distinguish between the additive and the multiplicative model with our data. Individual dose estimates ranged from 0 (for 43 subjects) to 0.56 Gy (mean 0.14 Gy) under the multiplicative model and from 0 to 0.95 Gy (mean 0.15 Gy) under the additive model. Dose estimates were similar under the two models when the number of translocations was less than 4 per 100 cells. The additive model tended to estimate larger doses when the number of translocations was greater than 4 per 100 cells. We also describe a method for estimating upper 95% tolerance bounds for numbers of translocations in unexposed individuals. We found that inclusion of data on age and smoking history was important for dose estimation. Ignoring these factors could result in gross overestimation of exposures, particularly in older subjects who smoke.
PubMed ID
10581536 View in PubMed
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Cellular drug sensitivity in MLL-rearranged childhood acute leukaemia is correlated to partner genes and cell lineage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17095
Source
Br J Haematol. 2005 Apr;129(2):189-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
J. Palle
B M Frost
E. Forestier
G. Gustafsson
P. Nygren
M. Hellebostad
O G Jonsson
J. Kanerva
K. Schmiegelow
R. Larsson
G. Lönnerholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, University Children's Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. josefine.palle@akademiska.se
Source
Br J Haematol. 2005 Apr;129(2):189-98
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Antineoplastic Agents - pharmacology
Cell Lineage
Child
Child, Preschool
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 9
Comparative Study
Cytarabine - pharmacology
Cytotoxicity Tests, Immunologic
DNA-Binding Proteins - genetics
Doxorubicin - pharmacology
Drug Resistance, Neoplasm - genetics
Female
Fluorometry
Gene Rearrangement
Glucocorticoids - pharmacology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, L1 - genetics - immunology
Leukemia, Myeloid - genetics - immunology
Male
Myeloid-Lymphoid Leukemia Protein
Prospective Studies
Proto-Oncogenes - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Statistics, nonparametric
Transcription Factors - genetics
Translocation, Genetic
Abstract
Rearrangements in the 11q23 region, the site of the mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL) gene, are found in both childhood acute myeloid (AML) and lymphoblastic (ALL) leukaemia. We studied the in vitro drug resistance by the fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay (FMCA) in 132 children with AML and 178 children with ALL (aged 0-17 years). In AML, children with t(9;11) (n = 10) were significantly more sensitive to cytarabine (P
PubMed ID
15813846 View in PubMed
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109 records – page 1 of 11.