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Actionable nuggets: knowledge translation tool for the needs of patients with spinal cord injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269783
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2015 May;61(5):e240-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Mary Ann McColl
Alice Aiken
Karen Smith
Alexander McColl
Michael Green
Marshall Godwin
Richard Birtwhistle
Kathleen Norman
Gabrielle Brankston
Michael Schaub
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2015 May;61(5):e240-8
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Australia
Family Practice - education
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Needs Assessment
Newfoundland and Labrador
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Primary Health Care
Spinal Cord Injuries
Translational Medical Research - methods
Abstract
To present the results of a pilot study of an innovative methodology for translating best evidence about spinal cord injury (SCI) for family practice.
Review of Canadian and international peer-reviewed literature to develop SCI Actionable Nuggets, and a mixed qualitative-quantitative evaluation to determine Nuggets' effect on physician knowledge of and attitudes toward patients with SCI, as well as practice accessibility.
Ontario, Newfoundland, and Australia.
Forty-nine primary care physicians.
Twenty Actionable Nuggets (pertaining to key health issues associated with long-term SCI) were developed. Nugget postcards were mailed weekly for 20 weeks to participating physicians. Prior knowledge of SCI was self-rated by participants; they also completed an online posttest to assess the information they gained from the Nugget postcards. Participants' opinions about practice accessibility and accommodations for patients with SCI, as well as the acceptability and usefulness of Nuggets, were assessed in interviews.
With Actionable Nuggets, participants' knowledge of the health needs of patients with SCI improved, as knowledge increased from a self-rating of fair (58%) to very good (75%) based on posttest quiz results. The mean overall score for accessibility and accommodations in physicians' practices was 72%. Participants' awareness of the need for screening and disease prevention among this population also increased. The usefulness and acceptability of SCI Nugget postcards were rated as excellent.
Actionable Nuggets are a knowledge translation tool designed to provide family physicians with concise, practical information about the most prevalent and pressing primary care needs of patients with SCI. This evidence-based resource has been shown to be an excellent fit with information consumption processes in primary care. They were updated and adapted for distribution by the Canadian Medical Association to approximately 50,000 primary care physicians in Canada, in both English and French.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26167564 View in PubMed
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An interdisciplinary knowledge translation intervention in long-term care: study protocol for the vitamin D and osteoporosis study (ViDOS) pilot cluster randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124096
Source
Implement Sci. 2012;7:48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Courtney C Kennedy
George Ioannidis
Lora M Giangregorio
Jonathan D Adachi
Lehana Thabane
Suzanne N Morin
Richard G Crilly
Sharon Marr
Robert G Josse
Lynne Lohfeld
Laura E Pickard
Susanne King
Mary-Lou van der Horst
Glenda Campbell
Jackie Stroud
Lisa Dolovich
Anna M Sawka
Ravi Jain
Lynn Nash
Alexandra Papaioannou
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1, Canada. kennedyc@hhsc.ca
Source
Implement Sci. 2012;7:48
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone Density Conservation Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Calcium - administration & dosage
Dietary Supplements
Drug Utilization
Fractures, Bone - prevention & control
Homes for the Aged - organization & administration
Humans
Information Dissemination
Inservice training
Leadership
Long-Term Care - organization & administration
Nursing Homes - organization & administration
Ontario
Osteoporosis - prevention & control
Pilot Projects
Reminder Systems
Translational Medical Research - organization & administration
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Abstract
Knowledge translation (KT) research in long-term care (LTC) is still in its early stages. This protocol describes the evaluation of a multifaceted, interdisciplinary KT intervention aimed at integrating evidence-based osteoporosis and fracture prevention strategies into LTC care processes.
The Vitamin D and Osteoporosis Study (ViDOS) is underway in 40 LTC homes (n = 19 intervention, n = 21 control) across Ontario, Canada. The primary objectives of this study are to assess the feasibility of delivering the KT intervention, and clinically, to increase the percent of LTC residents prescribed =800 IU of vitamin D daily. Eligibility criteria are LTC homes that are serviced by our partner pharmacy provider and have more than one prescribing physician. The target audience within each LTC home is the Professional Advisory Committee (PAC), an interdisciplinary team who meets quarterly. The key elements of the intervention are three interactive educational sessions led by an expert opinion leader, action planning using a quality improvement cycle, audit and feedback reports, nominated internal champions, and reminders/point-of-care tools. Control homes do not receive any intervention, however both intervention and control homes received educational materials as part of the Ontario Osteoporosis Strategy. Primary outcomes are feasibility measures (recruitment, retention, attendance at educational sessions, action plan items identified and initiated, internal champions identified, performance reports provided and reviewed), and vitamin D (=800 IU/daily) prescribing at 6 and 12 months. Secondary outcomes include the proportion of residents prescribed calcium supplements and osteoporosis medications, and falls and fractures. Qualitative methods will examine the experience of the LTC team with the KT intervention. Homes are centrally randomized to intervention and control groups in blocks of variable size using a computer generated allocation sequence. Randomization is stratified by home size and profit/nonprofit status. Prescribing data retrieval and analysis are performed by blinded personnel.
Our study will contribute to an improved understanding of the feasibility and acceptability of a multifaceted intervention aimed at translating knowledge to LTC practitioners. Lessons learned from this study will be valuable in guiding future research and understanding the complexities of translating knowledge in LTC.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22624776 View in PubMed
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An overview of the British Columbia Glomerulonephritis network and registry: integrating knowledge generation and translation within a single framework.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106448
Source
BMC Nephrol. 2013;14:236
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Sean Barbour
Monica Beaulieu
Jagbir Gill
Ognjenka Djurdjev
Heather Reich
Adeera Levin
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Sean.Barbour@vch.ca.
Source
BMC Nephrol. 2013;14:236
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Community Networks - statistics & numerical data
Glomerulonephritis - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Prevalence
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Systems Integration
Translational Medical Research - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Glomerulonephritis (GN) is a group of rare kidney diseases with a substantial health burden and high risk of progression to end-stage renal disease. Research in GN has been limited by poor availability of large comprehensive registries. Substantial variations in access to and administration of treatment and outcomes in GN have been described. Leveraging provincial resources and existing infrastructure, the British Columbia (BC) GN Network is an initiative which serves to combine research and clinical care objectives. The goal of the BC GN Network is to coordinate and improve health care, including robust data capture, on all patients with GN in BC, a Canadian province of over 4.6 million people. This provincial initiative will serve as a model for Canadian or other national and international endeavours.
The BC Provincial Renal Agency (BCPRA) is the provincial governmental agency responsible for health delivery for all kidney patients in BC. The BC GN Network has been created by the BCPRA to ensure high quality and equitable access to care for all patients with GN and is a platform for evidence based clinical care programs and associated health policy. All patients with biopsy-proven GN are registered at the time of kidney biopsy into the BCPRA provincial database of kidney disease patients, forming the BC GN Registry. Thereafter, all laboratory results and renal related outcomes are captured automatically. Histology data and core clinical variables are entered into the database. Additional linkages between the GN Registry and administrative databases ensure robust capture of medications, hospital admissions, health care utilization, comorbidities, cancer and cardiac outcomes, and vital statistics.
The BC GN Network and Registry is a unique model in that it combines robust data capture, data linkages, and health care delivery and evaluation into one integrated system. This model utilizes existing health infrastructure to prospectively capture population level data on patients with GN, producing a rich dataset capable of real-time identification and evaluation of GN health policy initiatives, of supporting observational cohort studies and health services research in GN, and of facilitating patient recruitment into GN clinical trials.
Notes
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 2000 Mar;35(3):448-5710692270
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PubMed ID
24168011 View in PubMed
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Applying the knowledge to action framework to plan a strategy for implementing breast cancer screening guidelines: an interprofessional perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113253
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2013 Sep;28(3):481-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Sarah Munce
Monika Kastner
Heidi Cramm
Shalini Lal
Sarah-Maude Deschêne
Mohammad Auais
Dawn Stacey
Melissa Brouwers
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Policy, Management & Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. sarah.munce@utoronto.ca
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2013 Sep;28(3):481-7
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - prevention & control
Canada
Clinical Competence - standards
Cooperative Behavior
Early Detection of Cancer - standards
Faculty
Female
Health Plan Implementation
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Information Dissemination
Neoplasm Staging
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Prognosis
Translational Medical Research
Abstract
Integrated knowledge translation (IKT) interventions may be one solution to improving the uptake of clinical guidelines. IKT research initiatives are particularly relevant for breast cancer research and initiatives targeting the implementation of clinical guidelines and guideline implementation initiatives, where collaboration with an interdisciplinary team of practitioners, patients, caregivers, and policy makers is needed for producing optimum patient outcomes. The objective of this paper was to describe the process of developing an IKT strategy that could be used by guideline developers to improve the uptake of their new clinical practice guidelines on breast cancer screening. An interprofessional group of students as well as two faculty members met six times over three days at the KT Canada Summer Institute in 2011. The team used all of the phases of the action cycle in the Knowledge to Action Framework as an organizing framework. While the entire framework was used, the step involving assessing barriers to knowledge use was judged to be particularly relevant in anticipating implementation problems and being able to inform the specific KT interventions that would be appropriate to mitigate these challenges and to accomplish goals and outcomes. This activity also underscored the importance of group process and teamwork in IKT. We propose that an a priori assessment of barriers to knowledge use (i.e., level and corresponding barriers), along with the other phases of the Knowledge to Action Framework, is a strategic approach for KT strategy development, implementation, and evaluation planning and could be used in the future planning of KT strategies.
PubMed ID
23749437 View in PubMed
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Asthma education program for First Nations children: an exemplar of the knowledge-to-action framework.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108105
Source
Can Respir J. 2013 Jul-Aug;20(4):295-300
Publication Type
Article
Author
Maureen L Douglas
Shawna L McGhan
Danielle Tougas
Nancy Fenton
Christopher Sarin
Oxana Latycheva
A Dean Befus
Author Affiliation
Alberta Asthma Centre, University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
Can Respir J. 2013 Jul-Aug;20(4):295-300
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - epidemiology - ethnology - therapy
Canada - epidemiology
Caregivers - education
Child
Curriculum
Disease Management
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Information Dissemination
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Review Literature as Topic
Translational Medical Research - methods
Abstract
The prevalence of asthma in Aboriginal children is 6% to 14%. Gaps in knowledge regarding asthma and its management exist in First Nations (FN) communities, and culturally relevant education and resources are required. Studies have recommended that the children's asthma education program, the 'Roaring Adventures of Puff', be modified through partnership with FN communities to be culturally appropriate.
To adapt this knowledge tool and design an effective implementation process for FN knowledge users (children with asthma and care providers), guided by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research knowledge translation framework.
The problem was identified, knowledge was identified/reviewed/selected (literature review); knowledge was adapted to the local context (FN working and advisory groups); barriers to knowledge use were assessed (by knowledge users); and interventions were selected, tailored and implemented (modified curricula and the creation of a new activity book and web-based resources, and regional coordinators, asthma educator mentors and community teams were recruited).
Major outcomes were the adapted tools and blueprints for tailoring implementation. Additional outcomes were preliminary observations and outputs from the iterative processes, including information about local context and barriers. Specific additions were roles for community members supported by asthma educators (applying FN teaching models and addressing health care demands); relevant triggers (addressing knowledge gaps); and FN images and stories, themes of circle, sacred teachings, nature and family/elders (culture and addressing low reading levels).
The framework model provides a logical, valuable tool for adapting a knowledge tool and implementation process to new knowledge users. Future research should measure uptake, effect on health outcomes of FN asthma sufferers and sustainability.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23936889 View in PubMed
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Barriers to implementation of stroke rehabilitation evidence: findings from a multi-site pilot project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124055
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2012;34(19):1633-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Mark T Bayley
Amanda Hurdowar
Carol L Richards
Nicol Korner-Bitensky
Sharon Wood-Dauphinee
Janice J Eng
Marilyn McKay-Lyons
Edward Harrison
Robert Teasell
Margaret Harrison
Ian D Graham
Author Affiliation
Neuro Rehabilitation Program, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. Bayley.Mark@torontorehab.on.ca
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2012;34(19):1633-8
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Communication
Education, Continuing
Evidence-Based Medicine
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - education
Humans
Pilot Projects
Professional Competence
Qualitative Research
Rehabilitation Centers - organization & administration
Stroke - rehabilitation
Translational Medical Research
Abstract
To describe the barriers to implementation of evidence-based recommendations (EBRs) for stroke rehabilitation experienced by nurses, occupational therapists, physical therapists, physicians and hospital managers.
The Stroke Canada Optimization of Rehabilitation by Evidence project developed EBRs for arm and leg rehabilitation after stroke. Five Canadian stroke inpatient rehabilitation centers participated in a pilot implementation study. At each site, a clinician was identified as the "local facilitator" to promote the 6-month implementation. A research coordinator observed the process. Focus groups done at completion were analyzed thematically for barriers by two raters.
A total of 79 rehabilitation professionals (23 occupational therapists, 17 physical therapists, 23 nurses and 16 directors/managers) participated in 21 focus groups of three to six participants each. The most commonly noted barrier to implementation was lack of time followed by staffing issues, training/education, therapy selection and prioritization, equipment availability and team functioning/communication. There was variation in perceptions of barriers across stakeholders. Nurses noted more training and staffing issues and managers perceived fewer barriers than frontline clinicians.
Rehabilitation guideline developers should prioritize evidence for implementation and employ user-friendly language. Guideline implementation strategies must be extremely time efficient. Organizational approaches may be required to overcome the barriers. [Box: see text].
PubMed ID
22631218 View in PubMed
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CADR and JCDA: partners in knowledge translation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113109
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2013;79:d76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013

[Canine cancer patients are included in translational research].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274746
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2014 Jul 7;176(28):V01130041
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-7-2014
Author
Betina Børresen
Malene Martini Clausen
Anders Elias Hansen
Kamilla Westarp Zornhagen
Annemarie Thuri Kristensen
Svend Aage Engelholm
Andreas Kjær
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2014 Jul 7;176(28):V01130041
Date
Jul-7-2014
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Denmark
Disease Models, Animal
Dog Diseases - diagnosis - radiotherapy
Dogs
Humans
Molecular Imaging - methods
Neoplasms - diagnosis - radiotherapy - veterinary
Positron-Emission Tomography - methods
Translational Medical Research
Abstract
Cancer bearing dogs represent a unique clinical cancer model with a direct potential for accelerating translation into human patients. A research collaboration between the veterinary and human medical facilities at Copenhagen University and Rigshospitalet has taken offset in this. Canine cancer patients are implemented for development of new strategies in molecular imaging and radiotherapy. The obtained results will be used to guide human clinical trials.
PubMed ID
25291999 View in PubMed
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CDA and CIHR partner to promote health equity for Aboriginal Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107091
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2013;79:d135
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013

100 records – page 1 of 10.