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Experiences of Kurdish war-wounded refugees in communication with Swedish authorities through interpreter.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99023
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2010 Feb;78(2):160-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Nabi Fatahi
Lena Nordholm
Bengt Mattsson
Mikael Hellström
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital and The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, 413 45 Gothenburg, Sweden. nabi.fatahi@allmed.gu.se
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2010 Feb;78(2):160-5
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Communication
Communication Barriers
Cultural Characteristics
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Iran - ethnology
Language
Male
Physician-Patient Relations
Refugees - psychology
Sweden
Translating
War
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To study experiences of war-wounded Kurdish refugees with respect to cross-cultural communication through interpreters. METHOD: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten men, aged 31-42. Content analysis was used for analysis and interpretation of data. RESULT: War-wounded Kurdish refugees experienced a number of difficulties regarding communication through interpreters, mainly related to the insufficient language link to the Swedish authorities, particularly health care personnel. In many instances, interpreters were selected based on the immigrant's citizenship rather than mother tongue, leading to a more complex, tri-lingual interpretation situation. Differences in cultural background, fear, suspicion and lack of confidence in interpreters were addressed as other problems by the participants. CONCLUSION: Interpreter competence and patient confidence in the interpreter are essential for an adequate cross-cultural health communication. Assignment of interpreters should be based on knowledge of the patient's/client's mother tongue, rather than citizenship, and the outcome is improved by a common ethnic and cultural background of interpreter and patient/client. Our study should be considered as a pilot study, and the results should be validated in larger cohorts as well as in other ethnic and language groups. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: In order to minimize communication misunderstandings, complicated tri-lingual interpretation situations should be avoided. Interpreters should ideally be assigned according to patient's/client's mother tongue rather than citizenship. Interpreters' competence and patient's/client's confidence in interpreter may have significant impact on communication outcome.
Notes
RefSource: Patient Educ Couns. 2010 Feb;78(2):139-40
PubMed ID
19375263 View in PubMed
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