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Access to healthcare and alternative health-seeking strategies among undocumented migrants in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132993
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:560
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Dan Biswas
Maria Kristiansen
Allan Krasnik
Marie Norredam
Author Affiliation
Danish Research Centre for Migration, Ethnicity and Health, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Øster Farimagsgade 5A, DK-1014 Copenhagen, Denmark. dabi@sund.ku.dk
Source
BMC Public Health. 2011;11:560
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asia - ethnology
Denmark
Emergency Nursing
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Nurses
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Transients and Migrants
Young Adult
Abstract
As in many European countries, undocumented migrants in Denmark have restricted access to healthcare. The aim of this study is to describe and analyse undocumented migrants' experiences of access to healthcare, use of alternative health-seeking strategies; and ER nurses' experiences in encounters with undocumented migrants.
Qualitative design using semi-structured interviews and observations. The participants included ten undocumented South Asian migrants and eight ER nurses.
Undocumented migrants reported difficulties accessing healthcare. The barriers to healthcare were: limited medical rights, arbitrariness in healthcare professionals' attitudes, fear of being reported to the police, poor language skills, lack of network with Danish citizens, lack of knowledge about the healthcare system and lack of knowledge about informal networks of healthcare professionals. These barriers induced alternative health-seeking strategies, such as self-medication, contacting doctors in home countries and borrowing health insurance cards from Danish citizens. ER nurses expressed willingness to treat all patients regardless of their migratory status, but also reported challenges in the encounters with undocumented migrants. The challenges for ER nurses were: language barriers, issues of false identification, insecurities about the correct standard procedures and not always being able to provide appropriate care.
Undocumented migrants face formal and informal barriers to the Danish healthcare system, which lead to alternative health-seeking strategies that may have adverse effects on their health. This study shows the need for policies and guidelines, which in accordance with international human rights law, ensure access to healthcare for undocumented migrants and give clarity to healthcare professionals.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21752296 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Sep 4;168(36):3008-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-4-2006
Author
Marie L Nørredam
Annette Sonne Nielsen
Allan Krasnik
Author Affiliation
Københavns Universitet, Institut for Folkesundhedsvidenskab, Afdeling for Sundhedstjenesteforskning, København K. m.norredam@pubhealth.ku.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Sep 4;168(36):3008-11
Date
Sep-4-2006
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural Characteristics
Denmark - epidemiology - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
European Union
Health Services Accessibility
Human Rights
Humans
Morbidity
Mortality
Red Cross
Refugees - psychology
Transients and Migrants - psychology
Abstract
Migrants include a broad category of individuals moving from one place to another, either forced or voluntarily. Ethnicity and migration are interacting concepts which may act as determinants for migrants' health and access to health care. This access to health care may be measured by studying utilisation patterns or clinical outcomes like morbidity and mortality. Migrants' access to health care may be affected by several factors relating to formal and informal barriers. Informal barriers include economic and legal restrictions. Formal barriers include language and psychological and sociocultural factors.
Notes
ReprintIn: Dan Med Bull. 2007 Feb;54(1):48-917349225
PubMed ID
16999890 View in PubMed
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[Access to health care for undocumented immigrants. Rights and practice].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167338
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Sep 4;168(36):3011-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-4-2006
Author
Anne Rytter Hansen
Allan Krasnik
Erling Høg
Author Affiliation
Københavns Universitet, Institut for Folkesundhedsvidenskab, Afdeling for Sundhedstjenesteforskning. annerytterhansen@hotmail.com
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Sep 4;168(36):3011-3
Date
Sep-4-2006
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Emigration and Immigration
Health Services Accessibility
Human Rights
Humans
Physician's Practice Patterns
Refugees
Transients and Migrants
Abstract
The purpose of this article is to illuminate undocumented immigrants' right to access to health care and their access in practice. Undocumented immigrants have a right to equal access to health care. Access to more than emergency health care in Denmark is dependent on immigration status. Medical doctors' duty to treat does not apply to non-emergency health needs, and the options existing in this situation remain ambiguous. In practice, undocumented immigrants in Denmark are able to receive more than emergency health care through unofficial networks of health care providers.
Notes
ReprintIn: Dan Med Bull. 2007 Feb;54(1):50-117349226
PubMed ID
16999891 View in PubMed
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Access to health care for undocumented migrant children and pregnant women: the paradox between values and attitudes of health care professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126329
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2013 Feb;17(2):292-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Mónica Ruiz-Casares
Cécile Rousseau
Audrey Laurin-Lamothe
Joanna Anneke Rummens
Phyllis Zelkowitz
François Crépeau
Nicolas Steinmetz
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. monica.ruizcasares@mcgill.ca
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2013 Feb;17(2):292-8
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Child
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Policy
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Healthcare Disparities
Human Rights
Humans
Middle Aged
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Access to health care for undocumented migrant children and pregnant women confronts human rights and professional values with political and institutional regulations that limit services. In order to understand how health care professionals deal with these diverging mandates, we assessed their attitudes toward providing care to this population. Clinicians, administrators, and support staff (n = 1,048) in hospitals and primary care centers of a large multiethnic city responded to an online survey about attitudes toward access to health care services. Analysis examined the role of personal and institutional correlates of these attitudes. Foreign-born respondents and those in primary care centers were more likely to assess the present access to care as a serious problem, and to endorse broad or full access to services, primarily based on human rights reasons. Clinicians were more likely than support staff to endorse full or broad access to health care services. Respondents who approved of restricted or no access also endorsed health as a basic human right (61.1%) and child development as a priority (68.6%). A wide gap separates attitudes toward entitlement to health care and the endorsement of principles stemming from human rights and the best interest of the child. Case-based discussions with professionals facing value dilemmas and training on children's rights are needed to promote equitable practices and advocacy against regulations limiting services.
PubMed ID
22399247 View in PubMed
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Access to primary and preventive care among foreign-born adults in Canada and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141023
Source
Health Serv Res. 2010 Dec;45(6 Pt 1):1693-719
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Lydie A Lebrun
Lisa C Dubay
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, 624 North Broadway, Room 447, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. llebrun@jhsph.edu
Source
Health Serv Res. 2010 Dec;45(6 Pt 1):1693-719
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Preventive Health Services
Primary Health Care
Transients and Migrants
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
To conduct cross-country comparisons and assess the effect of foreign birth on access to primary and preventive care in Canada and the United States.
Secondary data from the 2002 to 2003 Joint Canada-United States Survey of Health.
Descriptive and comparative analyses were conducted, and logistic regression models were used to assess the effect of immigrant status and country of residence on access to care. Outcomes included measures of health care systems and processes, utilization, and patient perceptions.
In adjusted analyses, immigrants in Canada fared worse than nonimmigrants regarding having timely Pap tests; in the United States, immigrants fared worse for having a regular doctor and an annual consultation with a health professional. Immigrants in Canada had better access to care than immigrants in the United States; most of these differences were explained by differences in socioeconomic status and insurance coverage across the two countries. However, U.S. immigrants were more likely to have timely Pap tests than Canadian immigrants, even after adjusting for potential confounders.
In both countries, foreign-born populations had worse access to care than their native-born counterparts for some indicators but not others. However, few differences in access to care were found when direct cross-country comparisons were made between immigrants in Canada versus the United States, after accounting for sociodemographic differences.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20819107 View in PubMed
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Acupuncture for substance abuse treatment in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174951
Source
J Urban Health. 2005 Jun;82(2):285-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Patricia A Janssen
Louise C Demorest
Elizabeth M Whynot
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V62-1Y6. pjanssen@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
J Urban Health. 2005 Jun;82(2):285-95
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Therapy - utilization
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Charities
Community Health Services - utilization
Humans
Middle Aged
Poverty Areas
Questionnaires
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - prevention & control - therapy
Transients and Migrants - statistics & numerical data
Urban health
Urban Health Services - utilization
Abstract
In British Columbia, Canada, the City of Vancouver's notorious Downtown Eastside (DES) represents the poorest urban population in Canada. A prevalence rate of 30% for HIV and 90% for hepatitis C makes this a priority area for public-health interventions aimed at reducing the use of injected drugs. This study examined the utility of acupuncture treatment in reducing substance use in the marginalized, transient population. Acupuncture was offered on a voluntary, drop-in basis 5 days per week at two community agencies. During a 3-month period, the program generated 2,755 client visits. A reduction in overall use of substances (P=.01) was reported by subjects in addition to a decrease in intensity of withdrawal symptoms including "shakes," stomach cramps, hallucinations, "muddle-headedness," insomnia, muscle aches, nausea, sweating, heart palpitations, and feeling suicidal, P
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PubMed ID
15872191 View in PubMed
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[Additional hosts of tapeworms and factors in the transmission of diphyllobothriasis in the Lower Priamur region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239073
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1985 Mar-Apr;(2):24-8
Publication Type
Article

Afro-American migrant farmworkers: a culture in isolation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192427
Source
AIDS Care. 2001 Dec;13(6):789-801
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
M. Gadon
R M Chierici
P. Rios
Author Affiliation
Tufts University School of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, Baystate Medical Center 01199, USA. mgadon@mass.med.org
Source
AIDS Care. 2001 Dec;13(6):789-801
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
African Americans
Agriculture
Female
Focus Groups
HIV Infections - transmission
Haiti - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Jamaica - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Sexual Behavior
Social Isolation
Transients and Migrants
United States
Abstract
Increasing rates of HIV infection have been found in migrant farmworkers in the USA over the past decade. By virtue of lifestyle, language and culture, these workers are not exposed to the typical media HIV prevention messages. To determine their level of knowledge about this disease for use in prevention messages targeted specifically to this population, five gender specific focus groups were conducted among Haitian, Jamaican and African-American migrant farmworkers in upstate New York. The focus groups revealed that the health belief system of these Afro-American migrant workers primarily reflects that of their indigenous culture. This impacts their interpretation and utilization of risk aversive behaviours. The data also suggest that the culture of migrancy itself affects the extent of risky behaviours practised, but further studies are needed to examine this phenomenon.
PubMed ID
11720648 View in PubMed
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[A genetic and demographic study of Dagestan highland populations and migrants to the lowlands. The relationship between levels of consanguinity, homozygosity and physiologic sensitivity].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213559
Source
Genetika. 1996 Jan;32(1):93-102
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1996
Author
K B Bulaeva
T A Pavlova
S M Charukhilova
I E Bodia
G G Guseinov
S Kh Akhkuev
Source
Genetika. 1996 Jan;32(1):93-102
Date
Jan-1996
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Altitude
Consanguinity
Dagestan
Demography
Environmental health
Female
Genetics, Population
Homozygote
Humans
Male
Transients and Migrants
Abstract
This is a continuation of a series of papers devoted to studying the genetic mechanisms of adaptation in migrants from isolated highland populations of Dagestan to new ecological conditions (lowlands). This paper describes the main results of studying the relationship between levels of inbreeding, homozygosity, and physiological sensitivity. Earlier, we found that decreased resistance to changing environmental factors in migrants to lowlands from the Dagestan highlands was connected with their high level of homozygosity. The data obtained allow us to assume that missing links in this chain of events include, in addition to parameters of inbreeding level, parameters of neurophysiological sensitivity, including absolute and differential sensitivity of various analyzers sensory systems, which are from 65 to 75% genetically determined. Migrants from highland auls (villages) to lowlands exhibited a decreased rate of sensomotor reactions in response to light and sound of various intensities, as well as decreased differential color sensitivity in the long-, medium-, and short-wave ranges of the spectrum, compared to highlanders. The results suggest the selective mortality of migrants from highlands to lowlands during adaptation to new conditions. Those migrants who dies were characterized by specific gene complexes that determined the characteristic features of expression of a number of interrelated polymorphic and quantitative traits. Thus, the high levels of homozygosity and inbreeding were accompanied by a greater neurophysiological sensitivity and lower indices of body weight and height.
PubMed ID
8647428 View in PubMed
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449 records – page 1 of 45.