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Addressing health inequities through indigenous involvement in health-policy discourses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121593
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2012 Jun;44(2):108-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Alycia J Fridkin
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2012 Jun;44(2):108-22
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Policy
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Indians, North American
Medically underserved area
Transcultural Nursing - organization & administration - standards
Abstract
Although the health of Indigenous peoples is affected by structural inequities, interventions to address health inequities are often focused locally rather than at a structural level where they could play a transformative role. Addressing structural health inequities by involving Indigenous peoples in health-policy discourses can serve to address power imbalances that are implicit in policymaking processes. Using an analytical framework based on interdisciplinary perspectives rooted in critical and decolonizing approaches, the author presents a discussion of theoretical considerations for including Indigenous peoples in policy discourses as a means of addressing health inequities. She argues that the involvement of Indigenous peoples in health-policy discourses has the potential to mitigate epistemological colonialism, push forward an agenda of decolonization, and address health inequities caused by inequitable systems of power. The article concludes with suggestions for future research and implications for nursing and health professionals of addressing structural inequities through attention to policy discourses.
PubMed ID
22894009 View in PubMed
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Core Competencies for Indigenous Public Health, Evaluation and Research (CIPHER): a health inequity mitigation strategy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121592
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2012 Jun;44(2):123-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012

Cultural care of Thai immigrants in Uppsala: a study of transcultural nursing in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52278
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2000 Oct;11(4):274-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
P C Lundberg
Author Affiliation
Uppsala University, Sweden.
Source
J Transcult Nurs. 2000 Oct;11(4):274-80
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Sweden
Thailand - ethnology
Transcultural Nursing - organization & administration
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to discover and describe the meanings and expressions of cultural care of a group of Thai immigrants in Sweden. Participants included 15 key informants and 24 general informants living in and around the town of Uppsala. The conceptual framework was provided by Leininger's theory of cultural care diversity and universality. Use was made of the ethnonursing method and the Sunrise Model in the search for multiple and related dimensions that influenced the generic and professional care practices of the Thai immigrants. Four major themes were formulated. Thus, care (a) means family and kinship relationships as expressed in daily life, (b) is expressed in traditional gender roles, (c) means religious beliefs as expressed in the Buddhist worship, and (d) means support of traditional health care practices. These themes support the cultural care theory and also confirm the Sunrise Model.
PubMed ID
11982036 View in PubMed
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Cultural considerations: developing a nursing care delivery system for a Hispanic community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224253
Source
Nurs Clin North Am. 1992 Mar;27(1):107-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
R. Adams
E H Briones
A R Rentfro
Author Affiliation
Valley Baptist Medical Center, Harlingen, TX.
Source
Nurs Clin North Am. 1992 Mar;27(1):107-17
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Culture
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Mexican Americans
Middle Aged
Nursing Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Organizational Innovation
Texas
Transcultural Nursing - organization & administration
Visitors to Patients
Abstract
Transcultural nursing should be the main focus of the nurse in any setting. Increased mobility of society demonstrates the need to understand anthropologic and cultural differences. The Valley provides a laboratory in which transcultural nursing can be examined more closely. Cadena recommends that MA nurses remain open to personal feelings generated by relationships with MA patients. The astute nurse assesses each patient's level of assimilation and provides care based on the findings. Comprehensive communication and patient and family participation are the keys to successful transcultural nursing. Sensitivity to modesty and pride translates into professional understanding of holistic needs rather than humiliation and alienation of the patient. At VBMC, these concepts are translated into working systems through the UACs and the bedside-managed care delivery system.
PubMed ID
1545982 View in PubMed
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Engaging with communities to foster health: the experience of inner-city children and families with learning circles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121594
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2012 Jun;44(2):86-106
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
M Judith Lynam
Erin Grant
Katie Staden
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2012 Jun;44(2):86-106
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Child
Community Networks - organization & administration
Family Health
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Transcultural Nursing - organization & administration
Urban Population
Abstract
The authors briefly introduce a clinical outreach initiative that is innovative because of the types of partnerships that have been formed within an inner-city community context. The initiative was designed to foster access to primary health care and specialized services for children and families who are vulnerable because of their social and material circumstances.Through ongoing engagement and dialogue, the clinicians and the community have developed a number of points of engagement with the children and families.The authors use the case of Learning Circles to describe ways in which Indigenous knowledge and ways of being influenced the approaches taken to working with children and families. They reflect upon the ways in which this approach influenced community engagement and consider its potential for achieving health equity.
PubMed ID
22894008 View in PubMed
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Exploring perinatal health in Indo-Canadian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196193
Source
Can Nurse. 2000 Apr;96(4):18-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
M J Lynam
B. Gurm
R. Dhari
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia School of Nursing.
Source
Can Nurse. 2000 Apr;96(4):18-24
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
British Columbia
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
India - ethnology
Maternal-Child Nursing - organization & administration
Needs Assessment
Nursing Methodology Research
Perinatal Care - organization & administration
Pregnancy - ethnology - psychology
Transcultural Nursing - organization & administration
Women - psychology
Abstract
Although many health concerns of women in India differ from those of Indian women in Canada, both groups of women have a high incidence of low birthweight babies. The question of how best to improve the health status of pregnant Indo-Canadian women and consequently improve pregnancy outcomes is a complex one. It involves the availability and allocation of financial and human resources, the integration of Indian cultural beliefs and attitudes with Western biomedical knowledge, the status of women in Indian culture, and Canadian social and economic issues such as demographic changes, changes in the role of the family, government policies, economic restructuring and so on.
Notes
Comment In: Can Nurse. 2000 Jun;96(6):311865479
PubMed ID
11143648 View in PubMed
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20 records – page 1 of 2.