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17 records – page 1 of 2.

American Indian health: Innovations in health care, promotion, and policy

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102365
Source
Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2000
Author
Rhoades, E, ed.
Source
Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Aboriginal peoples
Alaska Natives
Alcoholism
American Indians
Cancer
Cardiovascular diseases
Demographics
Diabetes
Diet
Diseases
Environmental health
Genetic polymorphism
Health conditions
Health status
Indian health services
Maternal, child, and youth health
Mental health
Nutrition
Oral Health
Research ethics
Substance abuse
Suicide
Tobacco use
Traditional medicine
Abstract
Part I: Demographics of Indian health
Part II: Political and administrative bases of Indian health
Part III: Major diseases and health conditions affecting Indians
Part IV: Special cultural and ethical considerations
Notes
Available at UAA/APU Consortium Library, General Collection, W84.AA1 A512 2000
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Bill C-51: Proposed federal regulation of traditional medicine

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257055
Source
Pages 394-404 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
2010
@Qi INDIGENOUS HEALTH AND WELLBEING Bill C-51: Proposed federal regulation of trad itional medicine BILL C-51: PROPOSED FEDERAL REGULATION OF TRADITIONAL MEDICINE Patrick Hutchins Orr Barrister & Solicitor, Independent Legislative Counsel, Ontario, Nunavut and the Northwest Territories
  1 document  
Author
Orr P
Author Affiliation
Independent Legislative Counsel, Ontario, Nunavut and the Northwest Territories, Canada
Source
Pages 394-404 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Aboriginal
Bill C-51
Canadian Food and Drugs Act
Medicine
Traditional medicine
Parliament
Abstract
Bill C-51 was introduced in Parliament in 2008. The Bill included changes to the Canadian Food and Drugs Act that some argue would have a significant effect on the delivery of traditional medicine by Aboriginal healers in Canada. Although the Bill has "died on the order paper," it is likely to be reintroduced by the current government in substantially the same form. The paper identifies the elements of the proposed changes in the federal government's legislative policy towards the practice of traditional medicine, as contained in the proposed legislation, discusses their possible effects on the practice of traditional medicine and assesses the potential ramifications on the rights of Aboriginal persons to practice traditional medicine.
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First Nations traditional models of wellness--Environmental scan in British Columbia

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99671
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
  1 website  
Author
First Nations Health Society
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural healing
Data Collection
Elders
Health programs
Knowledge-keepers
Shared wisdom
Traditional healers
Traditional knowledge
Traditional medicines
Traditional practices
Traditional wellness
Abstract
In September 2009, the FN Health Society on behalf of the First Nations Health Council conducted an environmental scan to gather information from the 123 First Nations Health Centers in British Columbia (BC) on their views and perspectives of traditional models of wellness or traditional practices and medicines. This project is aimed at providing background information for the FN Health Society to undertake further work if needed, on promoting traditional models of wellness within BC for First Nations.
Online Resources
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Indigenous Peoples & Health : Workshop '93 = Pueblos Indigenas y Salud : Taller '93 : Winnipeg, Canada [April 13-18, 1993]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292739
Source
Manitoba : Canadian Society for International Health. 107 p.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
1993

"Knowing women" : narratives of healing and traditional life from Kodiak Island, Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76368
Source
DAI, 49, no. 06A, (1998): 1545
Date
1998
Author
Mulcahy, Joanne Burke.
Author Affiliation
University of Pennsylvania
Source
DAI, 49, no. 06A, (1998): 1545
Date
1998
Keywords
Folklore; Anthropology; Women's studies; Ethnic and racial studies; Kodiak Island, Alaska; Women and history; traditional medicine and healing. Traditional medicine--Alaska--Kodiak Island. Women--Alaska--Kodiak Island.
Abstract
Native Women on Kodiak Islan, Alaska, tell a different story of the past than that recreated by the visible, dominant cultural forms. This study explores the differences in women's perceptions, values, and beleives based on oral history interviews. These were conducted on Kodiak during two years as a resident, then intermittenly over a seven-year period. Conclusions are based on participant-observation, comparison of ethnographic materials, and analysis of gener as a critical factor in the construction of identity, cultural values, and history.
Notes
Dissertation held at Consortium Library: General Collection WB50.AA5 1988
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Source
Lichen Secondary Metabolites, B. Rankovic (ed.) : Springer International Publishing : Chapter 2.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2015
Chapter 2 Lichens Used in Traditional Medicine Stuart D. Crawford Abstract Lichens are used in traditional medicines by cultures across the world, particularly in temperate and arctic regions. Knowledge of these medicinal uses is available to us because of the contributions of traditional
  1 document  
Author
Crawford, Stuart D.
Source
Lichen Secondary Metabolites, B. Rankovic (ed.) : Springer International Publishing : Chapter 2.
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
4078580
Keywords
Traditional medicine
Lichens
Secondary metabolites
Storage carbohydrates
Abstract
Lichens are used in traditional medicines by cultures across the world, particularly in temperate and arctic regions. Knowledge of these medicinal uses is available to us because of the contributions of traditional knowledge holders in these cultures.
The traditional medicinal uses of 52 lichen genera are summarized in this paper. Cultures in different regions of the world tend to emphasize different lichen genera in their traditional medicines, with Usnea being the most widely used genus. The folk taxonomy of lichens within a given culture is not synonymous with the scientific taxonomy and reflects the cultural value of those lichens and the traditional method of their identification. Even within western science the identity and taxonomy of lichens have not remained constant throughout history.
Lichens in traditional medicine are most commonly used for treating wounds, skin disorders, respiratory and digestive issues, and obstetric and gynecological concerns. They have been used for both their secondary metabolites and their storage carbohydrates. The European uses of lichens have been exported worldwide and sometimes influence the use of lichens by other cultures. These European uses started in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries and arose from interpretations of Ancient Greek uses, as well as the application of the doctrine of signatures.
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Life experiences in care, illness, health, and healing among Inupiat practitioners of traditional healing in Northwest Arctic Alaska : a qualitative exploration

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76367
Source
MAI, 31, no. 03, (1992): 1200
Date
1992
Author
Brew, N.E.
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Anchorage
Source
MAI, 31, no. 03, (1992): 1200
Date
1992
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Health Sciences; Nursing; Traditional medicine; Eskimo Medicine Traditional medicine--Alaska. Eskimos--Medicine--Alaska.
Abstract
The Inupiat of northwest Alaska, once dependent upon themselves for staying healthy and treating illness in a harsh environment, today have access to modern healthcare via an innovative hub system. The availability of modern healthcare and other human services has come at a cost, however, in terms of local Native control and the practice of traditional Native lifeways. Nurses and other healthcare providers outside the culture can improve the quality of care they provide by becoming culturally informed and providing culturally congruent care. Caring is assumed to be the central essence and primary activity of nursing. This study explored the life experiences of six Inupiat traditional healers in caring, health, illness, and healing. Ideas about caring are discussed, and ways of implementing these findings in the provision of quality care are suggested.
Notes
Dissertations: Held at Consurtium Library Alaskana Collection E99.E7 B748 1992
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Medical reasons for a change in the management of health services for Canadian Indian and Inuit communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2315
Source
Pages 334-337 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, UmeÃ?Â¥, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
  1 document  
Author
Shedden, D.A.
Author Affiliation
Department of National Health and Welfare (Canada)
Source
Pages 334-337 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, UmeÃ?Â¥, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Acculturation
Community Health Services
Social Change
Traditional medicine
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1605.
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Medicinal flora of the Alaska Natives: A compilation of knowledge from literary sources of Aleut, Alutiiq, Athabascan, Eyak, Haida, Inupiat, Tlingit, Tsimshian, and Yupik traditional healing methods using plants

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2765
Source
Anchorage, Alaska: Alaska Natural Heritage Program. Environment and Natural Resources Institute. University of Alaska Anchorage.
Date
1999
  1 document  
Author
Garibaldi, A.
Source
Anchorage, Alaska: Alaska Natural Heritage Program. Environment and Natural Resources Institute. University of Alaska Anchorage.
Date
1999
Geographic Location
U.S.
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Eskimos--medicine--Alaska
Traditional ecological knowledge
Traditional medicine--Alaska
Eskimos--ethnobotany--Alaska
Indians of North America--ethnobotany--Alaska
Indians of North America--medicine--Alaska
Alternative medicine--Alaska
Materia medica, vegetable--Alaska
Ethnobotany--Alaska
Botany, medical--Alaska
Wild plants, edible--Alaska
Abstract
This book is a comprehensive collection of traditional plant knowledge gathered from literature sources. It is not intended to be a guide book or "how-to" for using medicinal plants. It is, however, designed to be a tool for referencing traditional Alaska Native uses of healing with plants and provides baseline data for communities wishing to further enhance their knowledge of cultural plant usage.
Notes
Alaska E 98. M4 G37 1999
http://aknhp.uaa.alaska.edu/traditional_use/Med_Flora_AK_Natives.pdf
SMM Nov 2004
Documents

Med_Flora_AK_Natives.pdf

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Mental health services for American Indians: Neither feast nor famine

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101997
Source
White Cloud Journal of American Indian/Alaska Native Mental Health. 1978;1(2):3-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Summer-1978
Author
Beiser, M
Attneave, CL
Source
White Cloud Journal of American Indian/Alaska Native Mental Health. 1978;1(2):3-10
Date
Summer-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska Natives
American Indians
Healers
Indian Health Service Mental Health Programs
Indian leadership
Inpatient programs
Mental health
Outpatient services
Paraprofessionals
Residential treatment center
Traditional medicine
Abstract
The Indian Health Service, a division of the United States Public Health Service, is responsible for providing mental health services to approximately 500,000 American Indian and Alaska Native people. During the past 13 years the service has built a mental health program with inpatient and outpatient services, innovative projects to alleviate special Indian mental health problems, and statistical reporting procedures, all under increasing Indian leadership. During 1974, the mental health outpatient services reached three percent of reservation Indians. Inpatient services were provided by two hospitals and contracts with state hospitals. Future plans provide for increased services for children, new inpatient facilities, and expanded support of innovative approaches in Bureau of Indian Affairs dormitory personnel training and traditional Native American healers.
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17 records – page 1 of 2.