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5th Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference and Forum (2012) : "Resilience in a changing world". [Abstract book]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297025
Source
Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference Forum 2012. UAF Bristol Bay Campus, Dillingham, Alaska, March 28-31, 2012. 50 p.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2012
NOTES 17 Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference Forum 2012 Local Alaska Native Traditional Knowledge in relation to marine mammals and our way of life or “Piciryaraq” (Yup’ik Eskimo) Helen M. Aderman, Marine Mammal Program
  1 document  
Source
Western Alaska Interdisciplinary Science Conference Forum 2012. UAF Bristol Bay Campus, Dillingham, Alaska, March 28-31, 2012. 50 p.
Date
2012
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
3624398
Keywords
Alaska
Fisheries
Marine science
Traditional knowledge
Subsistence
Sustainable energy
Waste disposal
Food security
Ecosystems
Education
Documents
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Aboriginal Food Security in Northern Canada: An assessment of the state of knowledge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297086
Source
Expert Panel on the State of Knowledge of Food Security in Northern Canada, Council of Canadian Academies.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2014
task assigned to us. Rather, the trepidation resulted from knowing just how much evidence there is from scientific research and documentation, and also from a rich base of traditional knowledge and grey literature that informs the subject, but of which a comprehensive review has never been
  1 document  
Source
Expert Panel on the State of Knowledge of Food Security in Northern Canada, Council of Canadian Academies.
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
4736035
Keywords
Canada, Northern
Naive Poeples
Nutrition
Food security
Traditional knowledge
Experience
Policies
Notes
ISBN 978-1-926558-73-8 (pbk.)
ISBN 978-1-926558-74-5 (pdf)
Documents

foodsecurity_fullreporten.pdf

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Assessing the efforts to include the traditional knowledge of Indigenous Peoples into the projects and activities of the Arctic Council.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296933
Source
M.Sc. thesis, Department of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2014
Author
Thornton, Jessica
Source
M.Sc. thesis, Department of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh.
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Dissertation
Keywords
Arctic Council
Traditional knowledge
Abstract
The creation of the Arctic Council in 1996 represented a new chapter in Arctic cooperation, and the forum has since been instrumental in efforts to protect the Arctic environment and support sustainable development in the region. It is a unique forum consisting of eight Arctic states (Finland, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Iceland, Russia, Canada, and the United States) and six indigenous peoples’ organizations (the Arctic Athabaskan Council, Aleut International Association, Gwich’in Council International, Inuit Circumpolar Council, Russian Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North, and the Saami Council) that hold the status of Permanent Participants, as well as observers from various non-Arctic states and organizations. The involvement of indigenous organizations to such a degree is unique. With current environmental and geopolitical changes in the Arctic, interest in the Arctic Council has grown in intensity, which places unprecedented pressure on the Permanent Participants. In a world that is already experiencing the effects of climate change, it is critical that the indigenous communities of the North are considered and actively involved in decision-making, policy-making, and science in the Arctic. As a result, the main goal of this dissertation is to examine the ways in which the participation of the Permanent Participants can be strengthened within this forum. Because sustainable development remains a top priority for the council, the author also examines the way in which sustainable development has been understood by the council, which unearths a number of tensions when attempting to involve indigenous perspectives. Ultimately, this dissertation demonstrates how indigenous participation will require the equal and full inclusion of traditional knowledge into Arctic Council activities. Although this has been a long-term goal of the council, little concrete progress has been made in ensuring the inclusion of traditional knowledge, and the reasons for this are examined. By analysing the existing literature, policy documents, and interviews with experts such as indigenous leaders and representatives from the Permanent Participant organizations and anthropologists, this dissertation demonstrates the need to adopt a fuller understanding of sustainable development that seriously takes into account the perspectives of indigenous peoples in the Arctic. Furthermore, the interviews conducted demonstrate that traditional knowledge is inseparable from the people who hold this knowledge, and consequently the efforts to include traditional knowledge into the Arctic Council can be considered as a part of a much larger project: that of empowering indigenous communities in the Arctic. As a result this dissertation examines themes such as power, hegemony, and representation, all of which are central to the effort to include traditional knowledge into Arctic Council activities and projects.
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Back to the future: using traditional food and knowledge to promote a healthy future among Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295969
Source
In: Indigenous People's Food Systems by Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment. Chapter 1. p. 9-22.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2009
. Walter Hitschfield Geographic Information Centre, McGill University Library. Indigenous Peoples’ food systems | Inuit10 Photographic section >> III Abstract Evidence of nutrition and epidemiologic transition in Inuit communities prompted a case study where traditional knowledge and traditional
  1 document  
Author
Egeland, Grace M.
Charbonneau-Roberts, Guylaine
Kuluguqtuq, Johnny
Kilabuk, Jonah
Okalik, Looee
Soueida, Rula
Kuhnlein, Harriet V.
Source
In: Indigenous People's Food Systems by Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment. Chapter 1. p. 9-22.
Date
2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
704305
Keywords
Inuit
Traditional foods
Pangnirtung, Nunavut
Traditional knowledge
Abstract
Evidence of nutrition and epidemiologic transition in Inuit communities prompted a case study where traditional knowledge and traditional food is used as a basis for a community health-promotion effort to help improve overall diet quality including healthy market food choices. The current Inuit diet in the Baffin community involves a mix of traditional and market food. Caribou was the most commonly consumed traditional food item. Overall, 41 percent of energy was obtained from traditional food among 62 percent of respondents reporting traditional food consumption within the past 24 hours in the community health screening. Simultaneously, 58 percent of adults reported consuming an average of two cans of carbonated beverages in the past day, amounting to 10 percent of energy intake. Furthermore, the percent of n-3 fatty acids in plasma as a marker of traditional food consumption was inversely related to the percent of transfat in plasma as a marker of unhealthy market food choices (Spearman rho = -.44, p-value =.01). The data illustrate that traditional food is replaced by unhealthy market food choices.
A high prevalence of metabolic syndrome was observed (34 percent of 47 non-diabetic participants) using the new International Diabetes Federation criteria. Further, food insecurity was commonly reported, with 48 percent indicating that it was true or sometimes true that they “eat less or skip a meal because there isn’t enough money to buy food”; and 28 percent indicating “yes” to “in the last month there was not enough to eat in your house”. Fortunately, nearly all respondents (82 percent) indicated that friends and relatives shared their traditional food. The data illustrate that costs of market food items need to be considered in health promotion campaigns, and that traditional food promotion and sharing networks can help mitigate the rapid acculturation and transitions being observed. Finally, using traditional knowledge of indigenous food systems may be an effective way to promote healthy market food choices in an effort to prevent the adverse effects of acculturation.
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'Bushcraft' and 'Indigenous Knowledge' transformations of a concept in the modern world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297019
Source
School of Anthropology and Conservation, University of Kent. 320 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2016
  1 document  
Author
Fenton, Lisa
Source
School of Anthropology and Conservation, University of Kent. 320 p.
Date
2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
29597515
Keywords
Saami Kuksa
Traditional knowledge
Bushcraft
Sami
Bow-drill
Trapping
Abstract
The relationship between ‘bushcraft’ and ‘indigenous knowledge’ is investigated through a historical review, an examination of ethnographic literature, fieldwork amongst bushcraft practitioners, and through original case studies. Fieldwork was carried out in Sweden, the USA, and the UK. Case studies of the Saami ‘kuksa’, the ‘figure 4’ deadfall trap, and making fire by friction are used to explore a number of themes in the contemporary bushcraft world: the role of skilled-practice, ethical values, notions of an individually experienced connection with nature, practice as a personal transformative experience, and as an intersubjective relationship between practitioner and craft engagement with the material affordances in the landscape. It is argued that motivations for practice foreground a relationship with an environmental experience that counters ‘alienation’ through the development of techniques required to spend un-insulated time in nature which counter modern Western technocratic lifestyles. Bushcraft destabilises apparently similar categories of activity, particularly tourism, outdoor adventure recreation and education, historical reenactment and survivalism.
Documents

207Bushcraft-and-Indigenous-Knowledge--transformations-of-a-concept-in-the-m.pdf

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Climate change and health adaptation in northern First Nation and Inuit communities program

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96116
Source
Page 479 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
the gap, Health Canada - First Nations and Inuit Health Branch has developed a community-based research program, which aims to integrate both scientific studies and traditional knowledge, to help northern First Nations and Inuit increase their knowledge and capacity to develop health-adaptation
  1 document  
Author
McClymont Peace, D.
Myers, E.
Author Affiliation
First Nation and Inuit Health Branch, Environmental Health Research Division, Health Canada
Source
Page 479 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Community-based research
Food security
Health-adaptation strategies
Human health in a changing climate
Ice monitoring and safety
Northern First Nations and Inuit communities
Relevant communication material
Traditional knowledge
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 11. Community-based Participatory Research.
Documents
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Climate change and Indigenous Peoples : a synthesis of current impacts and experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295961
Source
United States Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, General Technical Report. PNW-GTR-944. 136 pp.
Date
October 2016
: climate change, indigenous, tribal, adaptation, traditional knowledge. Contents 1 Introduction 2 Climate Impacts on Indigenous Peoples in the United States 5 Framework for Understanding Climate Impacts on Indigenous Peoples 5 Tribal Sovereignty and Self-Determination 12 Climate Change and
  1 document  
Author
Norton-Smith, Kathryn
Lynn, Kathy
Chief, Karletta
Cozzetto, Karen
Donatuto, Jamie
Redsteer, margaret Hiza
Kruger, Linda E.
Maldonado, Julie
Viles, Carson
Whyte, Kyle P.
Source
United States Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, General Technical Report. PNW-GTR-944. 136 pp.
Date
October 2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
File Size
1397796
Keywords
Alaska
Indians of North America
Tribal
Adaptation
Indigenous
Climate change
Traditional knowledge
Health
Food security
Traditional foos
Displacement
Abstract
A growing body of literature examines the vulnerability, risk, resilience, and adaptation of indigenous peoples to climate change. This synthesis of literature brings together research pertaining to the impacts of climate change on sovereignty, culture, health, and economies that are currently being experienced by Alaska Native and American Indian tribes and other indigenous communities in the United States. The knowledge and science of how climate change impacts are affecting indigenous peoples contributes to the development of policies, plans, and programs for adapting to climate change and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This report defines and describes the key frameworks that inform indigenous understandings of climate change impacts and pathways for adaptation and mitigation, namely, tribal sovereignty and self-determination, culture and cultural identity, and indigenous community health indicators. It also provides a comprehensive synthesis of climate knowledge, science, and strategies that indigenous communities are exploring, as well as an understanding of the gaps in research on these issues. This literature synthesis is intended to make a contribution to future efforts such as the 4th National Climate Assessment, while serving as a resource for future research, tribal and agency climate initiatives, and policy development.
Documents
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Community-Based Marine Mammal Research in Alaska - Bowhead and beluga whales, walruses, and ice seals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297015
Source
Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Arctic Marine Mammal Program. 23 slides.
Publication Type
Report
Date
[2016]
, intestine for parasites •Blood for disease •Female reproductive tracts for productivity Traditional Knowledge Traditional Knowledge: Seals and Seal Hunting Community: _______________ Surveyor name: _______________ Date: _____________________ Household name: _______________ When (what
  1 document  
Author
Bryan, Anna
Source
Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Arctic Marine Mammal Program. 23 slides.
Date
[2016]
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
6822293
Keywords
Alaska
Bowhead whales
Beluga whales
Walruses
Ice seals
Traditional knowledge
Documents

D2_Community-Research_Bryan.pdf

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A community based wildlife health survey in Nunavut, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296439
Source
Second AMAP International Symposium on Environmental Pollution of the Arctic. Rovaniemi, 1-4 October 2002. Poster session I10.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2002
. Preliminary surveys of Inuit traditional knowledge confirmed changes in wildlife health and behaviour. The Nunavut Wildlife Health Project (NWHP) is a pioneering collaboration between Inuit communities in Nunavut, World Wildlife Fund-Canada and Trent University. This pilot project is designed to
  1 document  
Author
Sang, S.
Balch, G.
Metcalfe, C.
Author Affiliation
World Wildlife Fund-Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Source
Second AMAP International Symposium on Environmental Pollution of the Arctic. Rovaniemi, 1-4 October 2002. Poster session I10.
Date
2002
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
237472
Keywords
Nunavut
Arctic
Wildlife
Ecosystems
Traditional knowledge
Documents
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Contaminants, health, effective risk assessment and communication in the circumpolar north

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286400
Source
Pages 346-350 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
determining the safety of food items. This is predominately based on physical ind icators . Of the H EDM interviewees, there were varied levels of experience for including traditional knowledge in risk management; 45% had direct experience, 36% had experience in other aspects of research and 18% had
  1 document  
Author
Katelyn Friendship
Chris Furgal
Author Affiliation
Frost Centre for Canadian Studies- Indigenous Studies, Indigenous Studies Department, Trent University, Peterborough, Canada
Indigenous Environmental Studies Program, Trent University, Peterborough, Canada
Source
Pages 346-350 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Risk Management
Risk perception
Traditional foods
Contaminants
Traditional knowledge
Collaboration
Arctic Regions
Cross-cultural misunderstandings
Environment and health research
Indigenous knowledge
Politicization of information
Abstract
Objectives: With a better understanding of northern Indigenous risk perceptions related to food safety, this research aims to identify the role that Indigenous knowledge can play in risk assessment and management processes in order to support and ensure more culturally relevant and effective benefit-risk management strategies. Study design: This work is a part of a circumpolar review that is conducting case study evaluations in four regions on the topic of Indigenous environmental health benefit-risk assessment and communication in relation to contaminant exposure through the consumption of traditional/country foods. Methods: This project examines a series of events and communities in Yukon Territory, Canada. Forty-one interviews with traditional food experts (TFE) and environment and health decision-makers (HEDM) were conducted and analysed for thematic content. The research also included an extensive document review. Results: Overall, people are confident in their own ways of determining the safety of food items. This is predominately based on physical indicators. Of the HEDM interviewees, there were varied levels of experience for including traditional knowledge in risk management; 45% had direct experience, 36% had experience in other aspects of research and 18% had no direct experience. All interviewees discussed collaboration as a valuable process for effective risk management. Conclusions: â??Effective risk management" is dictated by the effort given to include the affected communities or populations. Yukon First Nations have their own way for determining food safety, and these methods and perceptions need to be considered in the framing of risk issues and from the initial stages of the management process. True collaboration is crucial for effectiveness.
Documents
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31 records – page 1 of 4.