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Alaska Native local and traditional knowledge inventory and bibliographic data base report

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2766
Source
Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies, University of Alaska Anchorage. 31 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
1998
Alaska Native Local and Traditional Knowledge Inventory and Bibliographic Data Base Report By Carl M. Hild Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies Under Agreement with Alaska Native Science Commission 27 February 1998 PART ONE - OVERVIEW “We have the wolf by his ears and we
  1 document  
Author
Hild, Carl M.
Source
Institute for Circumpolar Health Studies, University of Alaska Anchorage. 31 p.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
152003
Keywords
Alaska Natives
Traditional knowledge
Notes
Prepared under agreement with the Alaska Native Science Commission
Documents

Hild-Carl_Alaska-Native-Local-and-Traditional-Knowledge...1998.pdf

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Assessing the efforts to include the traditional knowledge of Indigenous Peoples into the projects and activities of the Arctic Council.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296933
Source
M.Sc. thesis, Department of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2014
Author
Thornton, Jessica
Source
M.Sc. thesis, Department of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh.
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Dissertation
Keywords
Arctic Council
Traditional knowledge
Abstract
The creation of the Arctic Council in 1996 represented a new chapter in Arctic cooperation, and the forum has since been instrumental in efforts to protect the Arctic environment and support sustainable development in the region. It is a unique forum consisting of eight Arctic states (Finland, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Iceland, Russia, Canada, and the United States) and six indigenous peoples’ organizations (the Arctic Athabaskan Council, Aleut International Association, Gwich’in Council International, Inuit Circumpolar Council, Russian Association of Indigenous Peoples of the North, and the Saami Council) that hold the status of Permanent Participants, as well as observers from various non-Arctic states and organizations. The involvement of indigenous organizations to such a degree is unique. With current environmental and geopolitical changes in the Arctic, interest in the Arctic Council has grown in intensity, which places unprecedented pressure on the Permanent Participants. In a world that is already experiencing the effects of climate change, it is critical that the indigenous communities of the North are considered and actively involved in decision-making, policy-making, and science in the Arctic. As a result, the main goal of this dissertation is to examine the ways in which the participation of the Permanent Participants can be strengthened within this forum. Because sustainable development remains a top priority for the council, the author also examines the way in which sustainable development has been understood by the council, which unearths a number of tensions when attempting to involve indigenous perspectives. Ultimately, this dissertation demonstrates how indigenous participation will require the equal and full inclusion of traditional knowledge into Arctic Council activities. Although this has been a long-term goal of the council, little concrete progress has been made in ensuring the inclusion of traditional knowledge, and the reasons for this are examined. By analysing the existing literature, policy documents, and interviews with experts such as indigenous leaders and representatives from the Permanent Participant organizations and anthropologists, this dissertation demonstrates the need to adopt a fuller understanding of sustainable development that seriously takes into account the perspectives of indigenous peoples in the Arctic. Furthermore, the interviews conducted demonstrate that traditional knowledge is inseparable from the people who hold this knowledge, and consequently the efforts to include traditional knowledge into the Arctic Council can be considered as a part of a much larger project: that of empowering indigenous communities in the Arctic. As a result this dissertation examines themes such as power, hegemony, and representation, all of which are central to the effort to include traditional knowledge into Arctic Council activities and projects.
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Traditional environmental knowledge as a relevant source for ecosystem management? Case studies and stories from Arctic co-management boards.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297012
Source
University of Cambridge. 14 slides.
Publication Type
Report
Date
[2006?]
  1 document  
Author
Debusmann, Martin Eduard
Author Affiliation
Scott Polar Research Institute
Source
University of Cambridge. 14 slides.
Date
[2006?]
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
70844
Keywords
Alaska
Traditional knowledge
Management boards
Documents
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Inuit Circumpolar Council-Alaska. 2014. How to Assess Food Security from an Inuit Perspective: Building a Conceptual Framework on How to Assess Food Security in the Alaskan Arctic. Progress Report to the 2014 ICC General Assembly.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295967
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council - Alaska. 13 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2014
monitored in order to create action plans. In part the development of this project aims to bring a greater level of Inuit involvement and Traditional Knowledge to future and ongoing assessment projects; providing greater insight into the Arctic ecosystem. Food security is not simply one of academic
  1 document  
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Council - Alaska. 13 p.
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
981917
Keywords
Alaska
Food security
Traditional knowledge
Inuit
Documents

ICCinput-FSProgressReporttothe2014ICCGA_0711_web.pdf

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A community based wildlife health survey in Nunavut, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296439
Source
Second AMAP International Symposium on Environmental Pollution of the Arctic. Rovaniemi, 1-4 October 2002. Poster session I10.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2002
. Preliminary surveys of Inuit traditional knowledge confirmed changes in wildlife health and behaviour. The Nunavut Wildlife Health Project (NWHP) is a pioneering collaboration between Inuit communities in Nunavut, World Wildlife Fund-Canada and Trent University. This pilot project is designed to
  1 document  
Author
Sang, S.
Balch, G.
Metcalfe, C.
Author Affiliation
World Wildlife Fund-Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Source
Second AMAP International Symposium on Environmental Pollution of the Arctic. Rovaniemi, 1-4 October 2002. Poster session I10.
Date
2002
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
237472
Keywords
Nunavut
Arctic
Wildlife
Ecosystems
Traditional knowledge
Documents
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Indigenous frameworks for observing and responding to climate change in Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296458
Source
Climate change and indigenous peoples in the United States : impacts, experiences and actions
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
P. Cochran
O. H. Huntington
C. Pungowiyi
S. Tom
F. S. Chapin III
H. P. Huntington
N. G. Maynard
S. F. Trainor
Source
Climate change and indigenous peoples in the United States : impacts, experiences and actions
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Indigenous people
Traditional knowledge
Western science
Abstract
Despite a keen awareness of climate change, northern Indigenous Peoples have had limited participation in climate-change science due to limited access, power imbalances, and differences in worldview. A western science emphasis on facts and an indigenous emphasis on relationships to spiritual and biophysical components indicate important but distinct contributions that each knowledge system can make. Indigenous communities are experiencing widespread thawing of permafrost and coastal erosion exacerbated by loss of protective sea ice. These climate-induced changes threaten village infrastructure, water supplies, health, and safety. Climate-induced habitat changes associated with loss of sea ice and with landscape drying and extensive wildfires interact with northern development to bring both economic opportunities and environmental impacts. A multi-pronged approach to broadening indigenous participation in climate-change research should: 1) engage communities in designing climate-change solutions; 2) create an environment of mutual respect for multiple ways of knowing; 3) directly assist communities in achieving their adaptation goals; 4) promote partnerships that foster effective climate solutions from both western and indigenous perspectives; and 5) foster regional and international networking to share climate solutions.
Notes
QC903.2.U6 C55 2014
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Reindeer herding, traditional knowledge and adaptation to climate change and loss of grazing land.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297066
Source
International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry. EALAT Project. 76 p.
Publication Type
Report
HERDING, TRADITIONAL KNOWLEDGE AND ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE CHANGE AND LOSS OF GRAZING LAND Ole Henrik Magga, Svein D. Mathiesen, Robert W. Corell, Anders Oskal (eds) Contributing authors: Rasmus Benestad, Mathis P. Bongo, Philip Burgess, Anna Degteva, Vladimir Etylen, Inger Marie G. Eira, Ravdna Biret
  1 document  
Author
Magga, Ole Henrik
Mathiesen, Svein D.
Corell, Robert W.
Oskal, Anders
Source
International Centre for Reindeer Husbandry. EALAT Project. 76 p.
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
4454253
Keywords
Sami
Reindeer
Traditional knowledge
Climate change
Notes
Partial Table of Contents: Climate impact on reindeer nomadism. Reindeer pasture use and land use change, Reindeer herders' traditional knowledge: codifying herders' adaptive knowledge. Reindeer herders' social and economic adaptation - institutions and governance as constraints and opportunities. Consequences of climate variability and change on reindeer. Welfare of reindeer and herds of reindeer - two ways of knowing. EALAT community based workshops in the Circumpolar North. Outreach of EALAT knowledge: the Reindeer Portal. Teaching, learning and building competence locally in reindeer herder' societies. IPY EALAT legacy. Vulnerability, resilience adaptive capacity in reindeer herders' society.
Documents

Reindeer-herding-traditional-knowledgem-adaptation-to-climate-change-and-loss-of-grazing-land.pdf

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The right to food security in a changing Arctic: the Nunavut Food Security Coalition and the Feeding My Family campaign.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297088
Source
Hunger - Nutrition - Climate Justice - 2013. A New Dialogue: Putting people at the Heart of Global Development. 4 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2013
research on how to address food insecurity suggest that recognising and respecting Inuit human rights can reduce people’s vulnerability to hunger, under-nutrition and climate change. Three primary factors appear to influence food insecurity in Nunavut:  Knowledge and awareness. Traditional
  1 document  
Author
Papatsie, Lessee
Ellsworth, Leanna
Meakin, Stephanie
Kurvits, Tiina
Source
Hunger - Nutrition - Climate Justice - 2013. A New Dialogue: Putting people at the Heart of Global Development. 4 p.
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
401594
Keywords
Nunavut
Inuit
Subsistence
Traditional knowledge
Climate
Documents

DublinConferenceOnHungerNutritionAndClimateJustice_NunavutCaseStudy.pdf

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Food sovereignty and self-goverance - Inuit role in managing Arctic marine resources. [Project description]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297089
Source
This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1732373. 2 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2016
  1 document  
Source
This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1732373. 2 p.
Date
2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
File Size
4032737
Keywords
Alaska
Inuit
Food secutriy
Traditional knowledge
Abstract
This project intends to examine the potential for Inuit, living in Alaska and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region (ISR) of Canada, to manage and co-manage important subsistence resources of the Arctic region, and to further identify the tools that Inuit communities need to sustain the overall integrity of their communities.
Documents

FSSG-Project-Description-1.pdf

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Back to the future: using traditional food and knowledge to promote a healthy future among Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295969
Source
In: Indigenous People's Food Systems by Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment. Chapter 1. p. 9-22.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2009
. Walter Hitschfield Geographic Information Centre, McGill University Library. Indigenous Peoples’ food systems | Inuit10 Photographic section >> III Abstract Evidence of nutrition and epidemiologic transition in Inuit communities prompted a case study where traditional knowledge and traditional
  1 document  
Author
Egeland, Grace M.
Charbonneau-Roberts, Guylaine
Kuluguqtuq, Johnny
Kilabuk, Jonah
Okalik, Looee
Soueida, Rula
Kuhnlein, Harriet V.
Source
In: Indigenous People's Food Systems by Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment. Chapter 1. p. 9-22.
Date
2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
704305
Keywords
Inuit
Traditional foods
Pangnirtung, Nunavut
Traditional knowledge
Abstract
Evidence of nutrition and epidemiologic transition in Inuit communities prompted a case study where traditional knowledge and traditional food is used as a basis for a community health-promotion effort to help improve overall diet quality including healthy market food choices. The current Inuit diet in the Baffin community involves a mix of traditional and market food. Caribou was the most commonly consumed traditional food item. Overall, 41 percent of energy was obtained from traditional food among 62 percent of respondents reporting traditional food consumption within the past 24 hours in the community health screening. Simultaneously, 58 percent of adults reported consuming an average of two cans of carbonated beverages in the past day, amounting to 10 percent of energy intake. Furthermore, the percent of n-3 fatty acids in plasma as a marker of traditional food consumption was inversely related to the percent of transfat in plasma as a marker of unhealthy market food choices (Spearman rho = -.44, p-value =.01). The data illustrate that traditional food is replaced by unhealthy market food choices.
A high prevalence of metabolic syndrome was observed (34 percent of 47 non-diabetic participants) using the new International Diabetes Federation criteria. Further, food insecurity was commonly reported, with 48 percent indicating that it was true or sometimes true that they “eat less or skip a meal because there isn’t enough money to buy food”; and 28 percent indicating “yes” to “in the last month there was not enough to eat in your house”. Fortunately, nearly all respondents (82 percent) indicated that friends and relatives shared their traditional food. The data illustrate that costs of market food items need to be considered in health promotion campaigns, and that traditional food promotion and sharing networks can help mitigate the rapid acculturation and transitions being observed. Finally, using traditional knowledge of indigenous food systems may be an effective way to promote healthy market food choices in an effort to prevent the adverse effects of acculturation.
Documents
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33 records – page 1 of 4.