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Alaska Traditional Foods Initiative & Movement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295223
Source
49 slides.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2016
Alaska Traditional Foods Initiative & Movement Melissa A. Chlupach, MS RD LD Regional Healthcare Dietitian NANA Management Services “The gathering, hunting, preserving and eating of traditional foods is more than just a diet – it’s a way of life for
  1 document  
Author
Chlupach, Melissa A.
Author Affiliation
Regional Healthcare Dietitian, NANA Management Services
Source
49 slides.
Date
2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
File Size
9145450
Keywords
Alaska
Traditional foods
Documents

TraditionalFoodsInitiativepresentationAKFoodPolicyConferenceWebinar5.26.16.pdf

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Assessment of contaminant and dietary nutrient interactions in the Inuit Health Survey

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96120
Source
Page 317 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
. We obtained funding support from the Northern Contaminant Program to measure the amount of environmental contaminants in the bodies of the participants, and to access the risks and benefits associated with the traditional food diet and the relationship between contaminants and health outcomes of
  1 document  
Author
Chan, L.H.M.
Van Pelt, L.
Egeland, G.M.
Qanuippitali Steering Committee (Inuvialuit)
Qanuippitali Steering Committee (Nunatsiavut)
Qanuippitali Steering Committee (Nunavut)
Author Affiliation
UNBC Community Health Sciences Program
Source
Page 317 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Canadian Arctic
Contaminants research
Environmental health policies
Inuit Health Survey (IHS)
Inuvialuit
Northern Contaminant Program
Nunatsiavut
Nunavut
Traditional food diet
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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Assessment of dietary benefit/risk in Inuit communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294085
Source
Centre for Indigenous Peoples Nutrition and Environment (CINE), Macdonald Campus of McGill University, and Inuit Tapirisat of Canada. [425 p.]
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2000
Author
Kuhnlein, HV
Receveur, O
Chan, HM
Loring, E
Source
Centre for Indigenous Peoples Nutrition and Environment (CINE), Macdonald Campus of McGill University, and Inuit Tapirisat of Canada. [425 p.]
Date
2000
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Inuits
Traditional food
Nutrient analyses
Notes
ALASKA QU146.K925 2000
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Back to the future: using traditional food and knowledge to promote a healthy future among Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295969
Source
In: Indigenous People's Food Systems by Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment. Chapter 1. p. 9-22.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2009
9Indigenous Peoples’ food systems Chapter 1 Back to the future: using traditional food and knowledge to promote a healthy future among Inuit . G R A C E M . E G E L A N D , P H . D . 1 . G U Y L A I N E C H A R B O N N E A U - R O B E R T S 1. J O H N N Y K U L U G U Q T U Q 2 . J O N A
  1 document  
Author
Egeland, Grace M.
Charbonneau-Roberts, Guylaine
Kuluguqtuq, Johnny
Kilabuk, Jonah
Okalik, Looee
Soueida, Rula
Kuhnlein, Harriet V.
Source
In: Indigenous People's Food Systems by Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment. Chapter 1. p. 9-22.
Date
2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
704305
Keywords
Inuit
Traditional foods
Pangnirtung, Nunavut
Traditional knowledge
Abstract
Evidence of nutrition and epidemiologic transition in Inuit communities prompted a case study where traditional knowledge and traditional food is used as a basis for a community health-promotion effort to help improve overall diet quality including healthy market food choices. The current Inuit diet in the Baffin community involves a mix of traditional and market food. Caribou was the most commonly consumed traditional food item. Overall, 41 percent of energy was obtained from traditional food among 62 percent of respondents reporting traditional food consumption within the past 24 hours in the community health screening. Simultaneously, 58 percent of adults reported consuming an average of two cans of carbonated beverages in the past day, amounting to 10 percent of energy intake. Furthermore, the percent of n-3 fatty acids in plasma as a marker of traditional food consumption was inversely related to the percent of transfat in plasma as a marker of unhealthy market food choices (Spearman rho = -.44, p-value =.01). The data illustrate that traditional food is replaced by unhealthy market food choices.
A high prevalence of metabolic syndrome was observed (34 percent of 47 non-diabetic participants) using the new International Diabetes Federation criteria. Further, food insecurity was commonly reported, with 48 percent indicating that it was true or sometimes true that they “eat less or skip a meal because there isn’t enough money to buy food”; and 28 percent indicating “yes” to “in the last month there was not enough to eat in your house”. Fortunately, nearly all respondents (82 percent) indicated that friends and relatives shared their traditional food. The data illustrate that costs of market food items need to be considered in health promotion campaigns, and that traditional food promotion and sharing networks can help mitigate the rapid acculturation and transitions being observed. Finally, using traditional knowledge of indigenous food systems may be an effective way to promote healthy market food choices in an effort to prevent the adverse effects of acculturation.
Documents
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Benefits of traditional food in Dene/Metis communities

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2872
Source
Pages 219-221 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Benefits of Traditional Food in Dene/Metis Communities Olivier Receveur and Harriet V. Kuhnlein Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), and School of Dietetics and Human Nutrition, Macdonald Campus of McGill University, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec, Canada
  1 document  
Author
Receveur, O.
Kuhnlein, H.V.
Author Affiliation
Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), McGill University, Ste. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec, Canada
Source
Pages 219-221 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Canada
Dene / Metis
Northwest Territories
Nutrients
Traditional foods
Abstract
Data collected in 16 Dene/Metis communities are used to illustrate the many nutritional, economic, and sociocultural benefits associated with the harvest and consumption of traditional food by indigenous peoples. These include exceptional nutrient composition, absence of industrial processing that changes quality and taste properties, taste preference, reasonable cost compared to market food, quality of the time spent on the land, increased physical activity, sharing of the harvest within the community, opportunity to practice spirituality, and encouragement for children to discover the natural environment. The importance of traditional food to the health of individuals and communities can be directly related to the nutritional value of the food itself, the physical activity associated with its procurement, and its role in mediating positive health determinants such as self-efficacy and locus of control.
Documents
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Canadian Arctic Contaminants Assessment Report: Human Health Assessment 2017.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297303
Source
Government of Canada. CACAR IV. 128 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2018
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2.1 Traditional food and contaminants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2.2 Human biomonitoring in northern Canada
  1 document  
Author
Curren, Meredith S.
Author Affiliation
Health Canada
Source
Government of Canada. CACAR IV. 128 p.
Date
2018
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3003466
Keywords
Northern Canada
Contaminants
Traditional food
Health outcomes
Exposure
Biomonitoring
Management
Assessment
Notes
ISBN : 978-0-660-08172-4
Documents

CACAR-Human-Health-2017.pdf

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Communication about health and the risk effect of eating traditional food

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2873
Source
Pages 222-224 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Communication about Health and the Risk Effect of Eating Traditional Food Gert Mulvad and Henning Sloth Pedersen Primary Health Care Clinic, Nuuk, Greenland Abstract: Like other populations, the Arctic population has to deal with the fact that specialized informa- tion made available to
  1 document  
Author
Mulvad, G.
Pedersen, H.S.
Author Affiliation
Primary Health Care Clinic, Nuuk, Greenland
Source
Pages 222-224 in R. Fortuine et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 96. Proceedings of the Tenth International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Anchorage, Alaska, 1996. Int J Circumpolar Health. 1998;57 Supp 1.
Date
1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Atherosclerosis
Communication
Contaminants
Greenland
Inuit
Traditional foods
Abstract
Like other populations, the Arctic population has to deal with the fact that specialized information made available to them through environmental and medical research is often difficult to grasp. Not only are the data complicated, they are also often misconstrued through media distortion. Communication is more than just information. Experience with communication gained during a 1990s international autopsy study in Greenland will be presented. The study looked at the possible protective effect against atherosclerosis due to the special fatty acid composition in the traditional food and also the effect of exposure of the local people to heavy metal and organochlorine. "When I eat traditional food, I know who I am" (Inuk).
Documents
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A community based initiative towards a sustainable food security strategy for the community of Old Crow, Yukon

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96147
Source
Pages 320-321 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
primary research question is: How will the Vuntut Gwitchin people of Old Crow adapt their food security strategies to maintain their health in the face of declining traditional food species resulting from climate change? Contact Norma Kassi (nkass1@whtvcable com)
  1 document  
Author
Kassi, N.
Author Affiliation
Arctic Health Research Network -- YU
Source
Pages 320-321 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
First Nation citizens
Food security strategies
Old Crow
Porcupine Caribou herd
Salmon
Traditional diet
Traditional food species
Vuntut Gwitchin
Waterways
Yukon
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral presentations. Chapter 8. Food Security and Our Environments.
Documents
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Contaminants, health, effective risk assessment and communication in the circumpolar north

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286400
Source
Pages 346-350 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
Territory, Canada. Forty-one interviews with traditional food experts (TFE) and environment and health decision-makers (HEDM) were conducted and analysed for thematic content. The research also included an extensive document review. Results: Overall, peop le are confident in their own ways of
  1 document  
Author
Katelyn Friendship
Chris Furgal
Author Affiliation
Frost Centre for Canadian Studies- Indigenous Studies, Indigenous Studies Department, Trent University, Peterborough, Canada
Indigenous Environmental Studies Program, Trent University, Peterborough, Canada
Source
Pages 346-350 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Risk Management
Risk perception
Traditional foods
Contaminants
Traditional knowledge
Collaboration
Arctic Regions
Cross-cultural misunderstandings
Environment and health research
Indigenous knowledge
Politicization of information
Abstract
Objectives: With a better understanding of northern Indigenous risk perceptions related to food safety, this research aims to identify the role that Indigenous knowledge can play in risk assessment and management processes in order to support and ensure more culturally relevant and effective benefit-risk management strategies. Study design: This work is a part of a circumpolar review that is conducting case study evaluations in four regions on the topic of Indigenous environmental health benefit-risk assessment and communication in relation to contaminant exposure through the consumption of traditional/country foods. Methods: This project examines a series of events and communities in Yukon Territory, Canada. Forty-one interviews with traditional food experts (TFE) and environment and health decision-makers (HEDM) were conducted and analysed for thematic content. The research also included an extensive document review. Results: Overall, people are confident in their own ways of determining the safety of food items. This is predominately based on physical indicators. Of the HEDM interviewees, there were varied levels of experience for including traditional knowledge in risk management; 45% had direct experience, 36% had experience in other aspects of research and 18% had no direct experience. All interviewees discussed collaboration as a valuable process for effective risk management. Conclusions: â??Effective risk management" is dictated by the effort given to include the affected communities or populations. Yukon First Nations have their own way for determining food safety, and these methods and perceptions need to be considered in the framing of risk issues and from the initial stages of the management process. True collaboration is crucial for effectiveness.
Documents
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Contaminants in Canada's North: Summary for Policy Makers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297305
Source
Government of Canada. Northern Contaminants Program. Canadian Arctic Contaminants Assessment Report III. 15 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2015
  1 document  
Source
Government of Canada. Northern Contaminants Program. Canadian Arctic Contaminants Assessment Report III. 15 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2856249
Keywords
Northern Canada
Humans
Health
Contaminants
Traditional food
Wildlife
POPs
Mercury
Abstract
The NCP engages Northerners and scientists in research and monitoring related to long-range contaminants in the Canadian Arctic. The data generated by the NCP is used to assess ecosystem and human health, and the findings of these assessments are used to address the safety and security of traditional/country foods that are important to the health and traditional lifestyles of Northerners and northern communities. The findings also inform policy, resulting in action to eliminate contaminants from long-range sources.
Documents

CACAR-Smry-Policy-Mkrs.pdf

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41 records – page 1 of 5.